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Commercial Banking Group Corporate Security Services Wade Horton, CPP, CFE Security Consultant April 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Commercial Banking Group Corporate Security Services Wade Horton, CPP, CFE Security Consultant April 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Commercial Banking Group Corporate Security Services Wade Horton, CPP, CFE Security Consultant April 2013

2 2 $573,000 Median loss in frauds committed by owner/executives in 2012 $180,000 Median loss in frauds committed by managers in 2012 $60,000 Median loss in frauds committed by employees in % Estimated revenue a typical organization loses to fraud annually ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.

3 Corporate Security Services – Main Functions Protect People −Access Control-Guard −Management −Internal/External Threats −Workplace Violence −Executive Protection −Active Shooter −Life Safety Programs Protect Property −Access Control −Physical Security Electronic Devices 24 hour monitoring Protect Information −Access Control −Data Centers −Other facilities with non public information −Network Security IT function 3

4 What is Fraud? “Wrongful or criminal deception intended to result in financial or personal gain” Under Common Law, four general elements must be present for a fraud to exist. 1.Material false statement 2.Knowledge that the statement was false when it was uttered 3.Reliance on the false statement by the victim 4.Damages as a result The Impact of Fraud Lost $ Reputation Years of lost business.4

5 5Confidential

6 “Our mission is to foster accountability and transparency in Louisiana government by providing the Legislature and others with audit services, fiscal advice, and other useful information.” 6

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8 About the ACFE The ACFE is the world’s largest anti-fraud organization and premier provider of anti-fraud training and education. Together with more than 60,000 members in over 150 countries, the ACFE is reducing business fraud worldwide and providing the training and resources needed to fight fraud more effectively. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.8

9 Methodology Survey Methodology The 2012 Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse is based on the results of an online survey opened to 34,275 Certified Fraud Examiners (CFEs) from October 2011 to December ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.9

10 Methodology As part of the survey, respondents were asked to provide a detailed narrative of the single largest fraud case they had investigated that met the following four criteria: 1. The case must have involved occupational fraud (defined as internal fraud, or fraud committed by a person against the organization for which he or she works). 2. The investigation must have occurred between January 2010 and the time of survey participation. 3. The investigation must have been complete at the time of survey participation. 4. The CFE must have been reasonably sure the perpetrator(s) was/were identified ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.10

11 Methodology Respondents were then presented with 85 questions to answer regarding the particular details of the fraud case, including information about the perpetrator, the victim organization and the methods of fraud employed, as well as about fraud trends in general. We received 1,428 responses to the survey, 1,388 of which were usable for purposes of this Report. The data contained herein is based solely on the information provided in these 1,388 cases. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.11

12 Executive Summary Summary of Findings Survey participants estimated that the typical organization loses 5% of its revenues to fraud each year. Applied to the 2011 Gross World Product, this figure translates to a potential projected annual fraud loss of more than $3.5 trillion. The median loss caused by the occupational fraud cases in our study was $140,000. More than one-fifth of these cases caused losses of at least $1 million. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.12

13 For businesses to operate and commerce to flow, companies must entrust their employees with resources and responsibilities. So when an employee defrauds his or her employer, the fallout is often especially harsh. This Report focuses on occupational fraud schemes in which an employee abuses the trust placed in him or her by an employer for personal gain. The formal definition of occupational fraud is: – The use of one’s occupation for personal enrichment through the deliberate misuse or misapplication of the employing organization’s resources or assets. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.13

14 How Occupational Fraud is Committed Our research has consistently reinforced the idea that occupational fraud schemes fall into three primary categories: – Asset misappropriation schemes, in which an employee steals or misuses the organization’s resources (e.g., theft of company cash, false billing schemes or inflated expense reports) ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.14

15 How Occupational Fraud is Committed – Corruption schemes, in which an employee misuses his or her influence in a business transaction in a way that violates his or her duty to the employer in order to gain a direct or indirect benefit (e.g., schemes involving bribery or conflicts of interest) – Financial statement fraud schemes, in which an employee intentionally causes a misstatement or omission of material information in the organization’s financial reports (e.g., recording fictitious revenues, understating reported expenses or artificially inflating reported assets) ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.15

16 ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.16 Financial statement fraud is the most costly form of occupational fraud, causing a median loss of $1 million. How Occupational Fraud is Committed

17 Executive Summary The frauds reported to us lasted a median of 18 months before being detected. As in our previous studies, asset misappropriation schemes were by far the most common type of occupational fraud, comprising 87% of the cases reported to us; they were also the least costly form of fraud, with a median loss of $120,000. Financial statement fraud schemes made up just 8% of the cases in our study, but caused the greatest median loss at $1 million. Corruption schemes fell in the middle, occurring in just over one-third of reported cases and causing a median loss of $250,000. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.17

18 Victim Organizations Industry of Victim Organizations For a better understanding of where fraud is occurring and at what frequency, we categorized the reported cases by industry. Banking and financial services, government and public administration, and manufacturing accounted for a combined 37% of the fraud cases reported to us. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.18

19 Victim Organizations The following chart sorts the industries of the victim organizations by median loss. Although the banking and financial services, government and public administration, and manufacturing sectors had the highest number of fraud cases, they were not as severely impacted by the reported frauds as other industries. For example, only nine cases reported to us involved the mining industry, but those cases resulted in the largest median loss. Similar findings were noted in the real estate, construction, and oil and gas industries. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.19

20 Victim Organizations ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.20

21 Victim Organizations ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.21

22 Perpetrators More than three-quarters of the frauds in our study were committed by individuals in six departments: accounting, operations, sales, executive/upper management, customer service and purchasing. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.22

23 Perpetrators Perpetrator’s Department The six most common departments in which fraud perpetrators worked were accounting, operations, sales, executive/upper management, customer service and purchasing. Collectively, these six departments accounted for 77% of all cases reported to us. As the chart on the following slide illustrates, the distribution of cases based on the perpetrator’s department was remarkably similar to the distribution in our 2010 study. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.23

24 Executive Summary Occupational fraud is more likely to be detected by a tip than by any other method. The majority of tips reporting fraud come from employees of the victim organization. Corruption and billing schemes pose the greatest risks to organizations throughout the world. For all geographic regions, these two scheme types comprised more than 50% of the frauds reported to us. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.24

25 Executive Summary Occupational fraud is a significant threat to small businesses. The smallest organizations in our study suffered the largest median losses. These organizations typically employ fewer anti-fraud controls than their larger counterparts, which increases their vulnerability to fraud. As in our prior research, the industries most commonly victimized in our current study were the banking and financial services, government and public administration, and manufacturing sectors. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.25

26 Executive Summary The presence of anti-fraud controls is notably correlated with significant decreases in the cost and duration of occupational fraud schemes. Victim organizations that had implemented any of 16 common anti-fraud controls experienced considerably lower losses and time-to-detection than organizations lacking these controls. Perpetrators with higher levels of authority tend to cause much larger losses. The median loss among frauds committed by owner/executives was $573,000, the median loss caused by managers was $180,000 and the median loss caused by employees was $60,000. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.26

27 Executive Summary The longer a perpetrator has worked for an organization, the higher fraud losses tend to be. Perpetrators with more than ten years of experience at the victim organization caused a median loss of $229,000. By comparison, the median loss caused by perpetrators who committed fraud in their first year on the job was only $25,000. The vast majority (77%) of all frauds in our study were committed by individuals working in one of six departments: accounting, operations, sales, executive/upper management, customer service and purchasing. This distribution was very similar to what we found in our 2010 study. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.27

28 Executive Summary Most occupational fraudsters are first-time offenders with clean employment histories. Approximately 87% of occupational fraudsters had never been charged or convicted of a fraud-related offense, and 84% had never been punished or terminated by an employer for fraud- related conduct. In 81% of cases, the fraudster displayed one or more behavioral red flags that are often associated with fraudulent conduct. Living beyond means (36% of cases), financial difficulties (27%), unusually close association with vendors or customers (19%) and excessive control issues (18%) were the most commonly observed behavioral warning signs. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.28

29 Executive Summary Nearly half of victim organizations do not recover any losses that they suffer due to fraud. As of the time of our survey, 49% of victims had not recovered any of the perpetrator’s takings; this finding is consistent with our previous research, which indicates that 40–50% of victim organizations do not recover any of their fraud- related losses. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.29

30 Executive Summary Providing individuals a means to report suspicious activity is a critical part of an anti-fraud program. Fraud reporting mechanisms, such as hotlines, should be set up to receive tips from both internal and external sources and should allow anonymity and confidentiality. Management should actively encourage employees to report suspicious activity, as well as enact and emphasize an anti-retaliation policy. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.30

31 Executive Summary Targeted fraud awareness training for employees and managers is a critical component of a well-rounded program for preventing and detecting fraud. Not only are employee tips the most common way occupational fraud is detected, but our research shows organizations that have anti-fraud training programs for employees, managers and executives experience lower losses and shorter frauds than organizations without such programs in place. At a minimum, staff members should be educated regarding what actions constitute fraud, how fraud harms everyone in the organization and how to report questionable activity. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.31

32 Detection of Fraud Schemes ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.32 Initial Detection of Occupational Frauds

33 Detection of Fraud Schemes Impact of Hotlines The presence or absence of a reporting hotline 3 has an interesting impact on how frauds are discovered. Not surprisingly, organizations with some form of hotline in place saw a much higher likelihood that a fraud would be detected by a tip (51%) than organizations without such a hotline (35%). ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.33

34 Executive Summary Managers and owners of small businesses should focus their anti-fraud efforts on the most cost-effective control mechanisms, such as hotlines, employee education and setting a proper ethical tone within the organization. Additionally, assessing the specific fraud schemes that pose the greatest threat to the business can help identify those areas that merit additional investment in targeted anti-fraud controls. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.34

35 Executive Summary Most fraudsters exhibit behavioral traits that can serve as warning signs of their actions. These red flags — such as living beyond one’s means or exhibiting excessive control issues — generally will not be identified by traditional internal controls. Managers, employees and auditors should be educated on these common behavioral patterns and encouraged to consider them — particularly when noted in tandem with other anomalies — to help identify patterns that might indicate fraudulent activity. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.35

36 Executive Summary The cost of occupational fraud — both financially and to an organization’s reputation — can be acutely damaging. With nearly half of victim organizations unable to recover their losses, proactive measures to prevent fraud are critical. Management should continually assess the organization’s specific fraud risks and evaluate its fraud prevention programs in light of those risks. ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.36

37 Fraud Prevention Checklist 1. Is ongoing anti-fraud training provided to all employees of the organization? ❑ Do employees understand what constitutes fraud? ❑ Have the costs of fraud to the company and everyone in it — including lost profits, adverse publicity, job loss and decreased morale and productivity — been made clear to employees? ❑ Do employees know where to seek advice when faced with uncertain ethical decisions, and do they believe that they can speak freely? ❑ Has a policy of zero-tolerance for fraud been communicated to employees through words and actions? ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.37

38 Fraud Prevention Checklist 2.Is an effective fraud reporting mechanism in place? ❑ Have employees been taught how to communicate concerns about known or potential wrongdoing? ❑ Is there an anonymous reporting channel available to employees, such as a third-party hotline? ❑ Do employees trust that they can report suspicious activity anonymously and/or confidentially and without fear of reprisal? ❑ Has it been made clear to employees that reports of suspicious activity will be promptly and thoroughly evaluated? ❑ Do reporting policies and mechanisms extend to vendors, customers and other outside parties? ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.38

39 Fraud Prevention Checklist 3.To increase employees’ perception of detection, are the following proactive measures taken and publicized to employees? ❑ Is possible fraudulent conduct aggressively sought out, rather than dealt with passively? ❑ Does the organization send the message that it actively seeks out fraudulent conduct through fraud assessment questioning by auditors? ❑ Are surprise fraud audits performed in addition to regularly scheduled audits? ❑ Is continuous auditing software used to detect fraud and, if so, has the use of such software been made known throughout the organization? ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.39

40 Fraud Prevention Checklist 4.Is the management climate/tone at the top one of honesty and integrity? ❑ Are employees surveyed to determine the extent to which they believe management acts with honesty and integrity? ❑ Are performance goals realistic? ❑ Have fraud prevention goals been incorporated into the performance measures against which managers are evaluated and which are used to determine performance-related compensation? ❑ Has the organization established, implemented and tested a process for oversight of fraud risks by the board of directors or others charged with governance (e.g., the audit committee)? ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.40

41 Fraud Prevention Checklist 5.Are fraud risk assessments performed to proactively identify and mitigate the company’s vulnerabilities to internal and external fraud? ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.41

42 Fraud Prevention Checklist 6.Are strong anti-fraud controls in place and operating effectively, including the following? ❑ Proper separation of duties ❑ Use of authorizations ❑ Physical safeguards ❑ Job rotations ❑ Mandatory vacations ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.42

43 Fraud Prevention Checklist 7.Does the internal audit department, if one exists, have adequate resources and authority to operate effectively and without undue influence from senior management? ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.43

44 About the ACFE Copies of the 2012 Report to the Nations on Occupational Fraud and Abuse are available from: Association of Certified Fraud Examiners World Headquarters The Gregor Building 716 West Avenue Austin, TX USA (800) (USA & Canada) (0800) (United Kingdom) +1 (512) (International) Fax: +1 (512) ACFE.com ©2012 Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, Inc.44


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