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Entire Contents Copyrighted Confidential Property of EVO Partners, LP dba ENTRUST Technology Consulting Services © 2010 ENTRUST Technology Consulting Services.

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Presentation on theme: "Entire Contents Copyrighted Confidential Property of EVO Partners, LP dba ENTRUST Technology Consulting Services © 2010 ENTRUST Technology Consulting Services."— Presentation transcript:

1 Entire Contents Copyrighted Confidential Property of EVO Partners, LP dba ENTRUST Technology Consulting Services © 2010 ENTRUST Technology Consulting Services. All Rights Reserved Copying, Use or Disclosure Without the Express Written Consent of ENTRUST Technology Consulting Services is Prohibited.

2 Cloud Computing Overview August 14, 2012

3 Welcome and Introduction Presenter: Mitch Sowards General Introductions Our Topic: ‘Cloud Computing Overview’

4 Heads Up! This presentation has two general “sections”. A section on the technology that makes “cloud computing” possible. A section demonstrating some of the types of cloud computing. So, if you are not much interested in the “nuts and bolts”, rest assured that the real world stuff is coming after we finish the “techie” part. (IF time permits, I have some “bonus slides” at the end on putting “One Foot in The Cloud”.)

5 Topics Terms and Definitions What exactly is a “Datacenter”? Cloud Computing – Simple to Complex – Hosted –“Folder in the Sky” –“Private Website” or “Hosted Intranet” –“Hosted Applications” –“Server in the Sky” –“Distributed Applications”

6 Terms Two common terms are being used: –“Cloud Computing” –“Utility Computing” They are not quite interchangeable

7 Cloud Computing – –Cloud computing” refers to utilizing, on a subscription basis, computing resources (storage, processing power, bandwidth, etc.) that you do not own with overtones of lack of concern about how/where the resources are delivered/located. – –For example, when you store all of your data on someone else’s equipment and it’s not housed on your own personal or business premises, you are taking advantage of one form of cloud computing. – –Often it is assumed that the computing resources are located in massive “datacenters.

8 Utility Computing “Utility computing”, on the other hand, refers more to how you purchase computing resources along with overtones of pervasiveness. So, for example, when utilizing “cloud storage” and you only pay for the number of gigabytes you use and when you can access your data from just about any location, you are taking advantage of “utility computing”. This is similar to the way we all purchase and access electricity and water resources – hence the term “utility”.

9 What the heck is a “Datacenter”? Computer facility designed for continuous use by many users, and well equipped with hardware, software, peripherals, power conditioning and backup, communication equipment, security systems, etc.* The scale and nature of “data centers” varies dramatically and is constantly evolving. * Definition courtesy of businessdictionary.com

10 A Key Datacenter Concept to Understand Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) PUE is a metric used to determine the energy efficiency of a data center. PUE is determined by dividing the amount of power entering a data center by the power used to run the computer infrastructure within it. PUE is therefore expressed as a ratio, with overall efficiency improving as the quotient decreases toward 1. PUE was created by members of the Green Grid, an industry group focused on data center energy efficiency*. metricdata centermetricdata center Therefore, in a “perfectly effective” datacenter where every unit of energy going into a datacenter was used to deliver computing resources (no waste or overhead) the PUE value would be 1.0. Average US datacenter PUE is 2.0 (Wikipedia entry for “datacenter”, last updated on 4-Aug-2010) * PUE Definition courtesy of whatis.com

11 Credit and Disclaimer For information on the following slides on “datacenters”, I am indebted to the Microsoft Global Foundation Services division who developed and provided much of the content. Much of the following information is courtesy of the Microsoft GFS blog and the Microsoft Data Center blog especially concerning statistics on their datacenters. Some information is anecdotal based on a tour of the Microsoft San Antonio datacenter. Because of my grateful reliance on the above resources, this portion of the presentation is rather “Microsoft centric”. But the information presented is generally representative of industry datacenters. If there are any errors, they should be attributed to me.

12 What the heck is a “Datacenter”? Data Center Colocation Generation 1

13 What the heck is a “Datacenter”? Quincy and San Antonio Generation 2

14 Generation 2 Datacenters San Antonio (and Quincy, WA), opened in August 2008 SA construction cost of about $550 million Total cost after outfitting with gear, about $2 billion PUE of about 1.4 (at time of construction, continually improving) Uses 8 million gallons/mo of recycled wastewater San Antonio was absolute “state of the art” in 2008… …and Microsoft will never build another like it! It’s obsolete!

15 What the heck is a “Datacenter”? Chicago and Dublin Generation 3

16 Generation 3 Datacenters Chicago (and Dublin, Ireland), opened in July ,000 square feet (about 16 football fields) PUE of /3 rd dedicated to “containerized” data centers

17 “Containerized” “Containerized” Data Center

18 “Containerized” Uses standard 40 foot shipping containers! Each one holds 2500 servers… …which represents 10X density over traditional datacenter Imagine the efficiencies due to – –“expand as needed” – –to localized cooling – –Quick ability to adopt new technologies and best practices for cooling, power, etc

19 What the heck is a “Datacenter”? Future Modular Data Center Generation 4

20 Generation 4 Datacenter Goal PUE of below Variable containers: – –for example, some with low reliability requirements could simply rely on “outside air” (10C to 35C temps and 20% to 80% relative humidity) – –For example, can eliminate generators, chillers, and UPS battery backups = dramatically reduced costs Imagine the efficiencies due to – –“expand as needed” – –Quickly build and deploy to new locations “just in time” – –Adopt new technology as needed without constraints of deisgn decisions made at “construction” time No people! – –Industry stats show that most datacenter failures are caused by the staff of the datacenter. Therefore, eliminate the people!

21 Generation 4 Datacenter A quick visual

22 Cloud Computing Simple to Complex Hosted “Folder in the Sky” “Private Website” or “Hosted Intranet” “Hosted Applications” “Server in the Sky” “Distributed Applications”

23 in the Sky has become the most “mission critical” of business applications. The technology of hosted is actually not new and the only difference from what you use today is where the service is provided from (a datacenter vs your own office). But because of the datacenter capabilities: –A hosted solution can purportedly achieve % uptime (2 minutes of downtime per year). This level of uptime is unachievable with on- premise gear. –Accessible from anywhere Many providers of Hosted Exchange or similar applications

24 Folder in the Sky An off-premise storage area for data: –Usually purchased on a subscription basis –Accessible from anywhere –Most transparently through synchronization between a local folder and the remote storage location –Often allowing synchronization between multiple devices –Often allowing differing permission levels to allow sharing with co- workers, friends, or the public Microsoft’s Skydrive is one example Egnyte.com and Oxygen Cloud are other examples Apple iCloud is another example

25 Private Website or Private Intranet An fully functional but private (or semi-private) website with more capability or specially designed features than a simple remote storage service: –Usually purchased on a subscription basis –Accessible from anywhere –Accessed through a web browser –Often allowing differing permission levels to allow sharing with co- workers, friends, or the public Microsoft Sharepoint Online is one example

26 Hosted Applications A full featured, function specific application made available through a web browser –Usually purchased on a subscription basis –Accessible from anywhere –Accessed through a web browser Intuit’s Quickbooks Online is one example Autotask is another example

27 Server in the Sky A server, exactly like one you would normally keep on premise, except provisioned and hosted through the “cloud”. –Usually purchased on a subscription basis –Accessible from anywhere –Accessed through a secure, high speed internet connection –Almost always “virtual” and “multi-tenant” –Provides identical functionality to existing on-premise servers but adding the unique “cloud” and “utility” features Rackspace most famously offers such services MANY other providers now in the market

28 Distributed Computing Leveraging the power of many computers (local or remote) working cooperatively to complete a task. Upcoming is a video clip from the recent Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference. (Start at 1:50:44) c2a9719d-fe3b-49c6-b158- 0ecb2461b9e4#fbid=vOiMLeWFj7O (Start at 1:50:44) c2a9719d-fe3b-49c6-b158- 0ecb2461b9e4#fbid=vOiMLeWFj7O Two years ago there was an even better video more applicable to accounting

29 Watch Out! There are some obstacles to “getting in the clouds”. You can’t just expect to throw away your servers and expect “the cloud” to meet all of your needs. Please visit and read the whitepaper entitled “Is Your Head in the Clouds?” for a short review of the hurdles and obstacles to be prepared for when making the jump into the Clouds. Please also look in that same resources section for the May 2011 whitepaper entitled “One Foot in The Cloud” for a quick explanation of how you can make a measured and deliberate transition to taking advantage of cloud services.

30 Summary Cloud Computing/Utility Computing are absolutely real service delivery mechanisms for computing resources today. Modern (and future) datacenters that are extremely dense and power efficient and distributed and are fundamental building blocks for cloud computing. Cloud computing service offerings range from the very simple to the very complex – but you can purchase what you need when you need it on the “utility computing” paradigm. But “watch out” because getting to the clouds is not a simple as just abandoning your servers. Unless you are really gung ho about moving to the clouds, it is possible to do so “one step at a time”.

31 Questions Let’s hear ‘em!

32 More information (866) (or local ETCS)

33 Entire Contents Copyrighted Confidential Property of EVO Partners, LP dba ENTRUST Technology Consulting Services © 2010 ENTRUST Technology Consulting Services. All Rights Reserved Copying, Use or Disclosure Without the Express Written Consent of Entrust Technology Consulting Services is Prohibited.

34 Expected Benefits Increased reliability and availability (cloud services can achieve % availability.) Increased accessibility (when hosted in the cloud, your files and applications become available from any internet connected location (home, coffee shops, travelling with a wireless notebook, etc.) No more spending money on maintaining and periodically upgrading servers. No more spending money on maintaining and periodically upgrading software applications. Ability to have I.T. capability expand and contract as the business needs dictate simply by paying a greater or lesser subscription fee (“utility computing”). A more general benefit of all I.T. related expenses being reduced commensurate with all of the “complicated” equipment like servers being gone.

35 Hurdles There are some obstacles to “getting in the clouds”. You can’t just expect to throw away your servers and expect “the cloud” to meet all of your needs. ?All or nothing? Some applications you might be ready to move to the Cloud while others not. How do you get the capital cost savings of moving some applications to the cloud when you still must maintain the “expensive” on premise gear for other applications? This is especially true if you have upcoming, necessary server replacements on the horizon. ? ? ? ?

36 Hurdles There are some obstacles to “getting in the clouds”. You can’t just expect to throw away your servers and expect “the cloud” to meet all of your needs. ?All or nothing? Some applications you might be ready to move to the Cloud while others not. How do you get the capital cost savings of moving some applications to the cloud when you still must maintain the “expensive” on premise gear for other applications? This is especially true if you have upcoming, necessary server replacements on the horizon. ?Servers perform many low-profile services such as providing security, resolving names on networks, sharing printers, etc. You can’t eliminate those needs just because high-profile services like or file storage move somewhere else. ? ? ?

37 Hurdles There are some obstacles to “getting in the clouds”. You can’t just expect to throw away your servers and expect “the cloud” to meet all of your needs. ?All or nothing? Some applications you might be ready to move to the Cloud while others not. How do you get the capital cost savings of moving some applications to the cloud when you still must maintain the “expensive” on premise gear for other applications? This is especially true if you have upcoming, necessary server replacements on the horizon. ?Servers perform many low-profile services such as providing security, resolving names on networks, sharing printers, etc. You can’t eliminate those needs just because high-profile services like or file storage move somewhere else. ?What happens when your internet is down or too slow? You are dead in the water. ? ?

38 Hurdles There are some obstacles to “getting in the clouds”. You can’t just expect to throw away your servers and expect “the cloud” to meet all of your needs. ?All or nothing? Some applications you might be ready to move to the Cloud while others not. How do you get the capital cost savings of moving some applications to the cloud when you still must maintain the “expensive” on premise gear for other applications? This is especially true if you have upcoming, necessary server replacements on the horizon. ?Servers perform many low-profile services such as providing security, resolving names on networks, sharing printers, etc. You can’t eliminate those needs just because high-profile services like or file storage move somewhere else. ?What happens when your internet is down or too slow? You are dead in the water. ?PC management? How do you provide care to the PCs in your office when the big ‘ol servers are gone? How do you protect data on those PCs that doesn’t get safely sent to “the cloud”? ?

39 Hurdles There are some obstacles to “getting in the clouds”. You can’t just expect to throw away your servers and expect “the cloud” to meet all of your needs. ?All or nothing? Some applications you might be ready to move to the Cloud while others not. How do you get the capital cost savings of moving some applications to the cloud when you still must maintain the “expensive” on premise gear for other applications? This is especially true if you have upcoming, necessary server replacements on the horizon. ?Servers perform many low-profile services such as providing security, resolving names on networks, sharing printers, etc. You can’t eliminate those needs just because high-profile services like or file storage move somewhere else. ?What happens when your internet is down or too slow? You are dead in the water. ?PC management? How do you provide care to the PCs in your office when the big ‘ol servers are gone? How do you protect data on those PCs that doesn’t get safely sent to “the cloud”? ?In the long run, high subscription fees can far exceed the costs of maintaining on premise equipment.

40 How to Put One Foot in The Cloud Number “Getting There” Strategy Steps

41 How to Put One Foot in The Cloud Number “Getting There” Strategy Steps 1Survey your Mission Critical applications: , File storage, Line-of-business applications (accounting, etc.)? Determine which ones you would most benefit from achieving increased reliability and increased accessibility

42 How to Put One Foot in The Cloud Number “Getting There” Strategy Steps 1Survey your Mission Critical applications: , File storage, Line-of-business applications (accounting, etc.)? Determine which ones you would most benefit from achieving increased reliability and increased accessibility. 2Analyze which MC applications are “ready” for the transition: Just because certain applications are “available” in the cloud, it does not mean that they are as robust in features and functionality as existing on premise applications. Determine which MC applications are truly ready for a move to the cloud

43 How to Put One Foot in The Cloud Number “Getting There” Strategy Steps 1Survey your Mission Critical applications: , File storage, Line-of-business applications (accounting, etc.)? Determine which ones you would most benefit from achieving increased reliability and increased accessibility. 2Analyze which MC applications are “ready” for the transition: Just because certain applications are “available” in the cloud, it does not mean that they are as robust in features and functionality as existing on premise applications. Determine which MC applications are truly ready for a move to the cloud. 3Review your server replacement schedule: Look ahead to see when you are scheduled to upgrade or replace existing servers which deliver those mission critical applications which you are ready to move

44 How to Put One Foot in The Cloud Number “Getting There” Strategy Steps 1Survey your Mission Critical applications: , File storage, Line-of-business applications (accounting, etc.)? Determine which ones you would most benefit from achieving increased reliability and increased accessibility. 2Analyze which MC applications are “ready” for the transition: Just because certain applications are “available” in the cloud, it does not mean that they are as robust in features and functionality as existing on premise applications. Determine which MC applications are truly ready for a move to the cloud. 3Review your server replacement schedule: Look ahead to see when you are scheduled to upgrade or replace existing servers which deliver those mission critical applications which you are ready to move. 4Reconcile applications to move with server replacement: Arrange to move desired Mission Critical applications to the cloud either in advance of or in conjunction with server replacements. “Low profile” server functions can be transferred to servers where other Mission Critical applications will remain on- premise. 5 6

45 How to Put One Foot in The Cloud Number “Getting There” Strategy Steps 1Survey your Mission Critical applications: , File storage, Line-of-business applications (accounting, etc.)? Determine which ones you would most benefit from achieving increased reliability and increased accessibility. 2Analyze which MC applications are “ready” for the transition: Just because certain applications are “available” in the cloud, it does not mean that they are as robust in features and functionality as existing on premise applications. Determine which MC applications are truly ready for a move to the cloud. 3Review your server replacement schedule: Look ahead to see when you are scheduled to upgrade or replace existing servers which deliver those mission critical applications which you are ready to move. 4Reconcile applications to move with server replacement: Arrange to move desired Mission Critical applications to the cloud either in advance of or in conjunction with server replacements. “Low profile” server functions can be transferred to servers where other Mission Critical applications will remain on- premise. 5Prepare high-speed “fault tolerant” internet or prepare “fallback” plans: Put in place high-speed and highly available or redundant internet circuits to protect against internet outages. Alternately, make plans for workers to go to other locations (home, elsewhere?) during internet outages. 6

46 How to Put One Foot in The Cloud Number “Getting There” Strategy Steps 1Survey your Mission Critical applications: , File storage, Line-of-business applications (accounting, etc.)? Determine which ones you would most benefit from achieving increased reliability and increased accessibility. 2Analyze which MC applications are “ready” for the transition: Just because certain applications are “available” in the cloud, it does not mean that they are as robust in features and functionality as existing on premise applications. Determine which MC applications are truly ready for a move to the cloud. 3Review your server replacement schedule: Look ahead to see when you are scheduled to upgrade or replace existing servers which deliver those mission critical applications which you are ready to move. 4Reconcile applications to move with server replacement: Arrange to move desired Mission Critical applications to the cloud either in advance of or in conjunction with server replacements. “Low profile” server functions can be transferred to servers where other Mission Critical applications will remain on- premise. 5Prepare high-speed “fault tolerant” internet or prepare “fallback” plans: Put in place high-speed and highly available or redundant internet circuits to protect against internet outages. Alternately, make plans for workers to go to other locations (home, elsewhere?) during internet outages. 6Make the move! Following the above plan, you can move applications to the cloud one at a time and hopefully reduce capital costs by replacing the retired servers with subscription cloud services.

47 Some Gotchas (and how to overcome them) What if you have only a single server hosting multiple applications? What if you have many servers but eventually will get down to the “last one”? How do you maintain those “low profile” server functions? How do you handle the PC management? GotchaSolution One server Last server PC management

48 What if you have only a single server hosting multiple applications? What if you have many servers but eventually will get down to the “last one”? How do you maintain those “low profile” server functions? How do you handle the PC management? GotchaSolution One serverTwo choices: Either do a “big bang” migration of all services to the cloud at the same time or start sooner rather than later and start moving applications to the cloud long before your single server is ready for retirement. When you are down to only one or two mission critical applications, see the “last server” gotcha below. Last server PC management Some Gotchas (and how to overcome them)

49 What if you have only a single server hosting multiple applications? What if you have many servers but eventually will get down to the “last one”? How do you maintain those “low profile” server functions? How do you handle the PC management? GotchaSolution One serverTwo choices: Either do a “big bang” migration of all services to the cloud at the same time or start sooner rather than later and start moving applications to the cloud long before your single server is ready for retirement. When you are down to only one or two mission critical applications, see the “last server” gotcha below. Last serverReplace that last server with a “micro-server” able to perform only those low- profile services. If you must maintain some mission critical applications on premise, then your “micro-server” might have to be a little beefier, but still less expensive than the servers you have been accustomed to purchasing. PC management Some Gotchas (and how to overcome them)

50 What if you have only a single server hosting multiple applications? What if you have many servers but eventually will get down to the “last one”? How do you maintain those “low profile” server functions? How do you handle the PC management? GotchaSolution One serverTwo choices: Either do a “big bang” migration of all services to the cloud at the same time or start sooner rather than later and start moving applications to the cloud long before your single server is ready for retirement. When you are down to only one or two mission critical applications, see the “last server” gotcha below. Last serverReplace that last server with a “micro-server” able to perform only those low- profile services. If you must maintain some mission critical applications on premise, then your “micro-server” might have to be a little beefier, but still less expensive than the servers you have been accustomed to purchasing. PC management Again, use a “micro-server” to provide low-profile services AND PC management. Another alternative is for someone (like ENTRUST) to provide you with a “cloud server” not located on your premises to deliver a bare minimum of the necessary PC management. Some Gotchas (and how to overcome them)

51 The Hurdle that Remains (this is a test!) COST! Subscription fees can be higher than ownership over the long term. But this is one “hurdle” you don’t need to get over because you get additional value! You are paying more because you are getting the below additional benefits:   Much increased availability and reliability (99.999% maybe)   Much increased accessibility (access from anywhere)   Lower risk of data loss (backups and redundancy are built-in cloud functions)   Fewer headaches (because of above benefits)   The ability to expand/contract in exact increments as business needs dictate.


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