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The Public Health Responsibility Deal and what it means for industry Barbara Gallani Director Food Safety and Science HEALTHIER BRANDS FOR A HEALTHIER.

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Presentation on theme: "The Public Health Responsibility Deal and what it means for industry Barbara Gallani Director Food Safety and Science HEALTHIER BRANDS FOR A HEALTHIER."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Public Health Responsibility Deal and what it means for industry Barbara Gallani Director Food Safety and Science HEALTHIER BRANDS FOR A HEALTHIER BUSINESS FOOD & DRINK SUMMIT, 17 March 2011

2 FDF represent food producers of all sizes; Food and drink is the UK’s biggest manufacturing sector and a British success story; With size comes responsibility: health and wellbeing is one of FDF’s four key policy areas. FDF: the voice of UK manufacturers

3 Our priority as an industry Providing consumers with food that is safe, nutritious and affordable – with the lowest possible environmental impacts

4 Consumer issues shaping our agenda 1.Health and wellbeing (73%); 2.Provenance (46%); 3.Convenience (42%); 4.Higher quality (38%); 5.Better informed (38%); 6.Ethical consumption (38%); 7.Rising indulgence (29%); 8.More grazing (25%); 9.Organics (25%); 10.Functional foods (21%). Source: Deloitte, Food and Beverage 2012

5 Obesity: a growing public health issue

6 Public health is a top political priority

7 Public health: three drivers of change A challenging policy environment targeted on clear public health objectives Competitive instincts of industry allowed to flourish through voluntary action, rather than regulatory constraint Consumer demand for healthier products and services

8 So, have we stepped up to the plate? Products; Nutrition information; Marketing; Workplace wellbeing; Education and social marketing.

9 Old favourites – new recipes No sign of any ‘health crunch’ during the recession; A key pillar of industry’s ongoing innovation efforts; Healthy eating options worth £8bn+ in key categories.

10  Old favourites – new recipes  New products  Healthier options

11 Trans fats Salt reduction Energy density Saturated fat Fruit and veg Fibre

12 Recipe for Change - significant barriers remain Consumer acceptability (incl. trend for naturalness and use of new technologies) Manufacturing processes Address some safety concerns Lower shelf life = more waste?

13 Bread ‘Salt reduction in premium bread: Understanding the influence of physical and chemical properties on stickiness, collapse and open texture’

14 Biscuits and Cakes Biscuits Small amount of added salt used for taste Significant contribution to the sodium content from the raising agent used In doughs with significant gluten development, such as crackers and semi-sweet types, salt toughens the gluten and gives a less sticky dough Cakes Typically in cakes, over half of the sodium comes from sources other than added salt: - Significant contribution: raising agent used - Additional: eggs, milk powder, golden syrup, butter, fruits, nuts and jam Use of salted butter (microbiology and taste) Use of sodium citrate as a preservative of fruit instead of citric acid

15 What’s been happening in the market? Grams of salt per 100g of productGrams of saturated fat per 100g of product Source: Kantar Worldpanel research for FDF

16 Improving consumers’ food literacy Clearer nutrition information an important tool for food literacy; UK leads the way with on-pack information (front and back); Strong UK debate around principles for front-of-pack; European regulation on its way; How do we get more people to use the labels – and improve catering information?

17 Developing healthier workplaces Going beyond traditional health and safety agenda; Building ‘energy balance’ into the workplace environment; Reformulation on the menu; Clearer canteen information: calories per portion (GDA); Supporting staff – diet, smoking and mental resilience issues.

18 A Responsibility Deal with business? Better diets, increased physical activity and healthier lifestyles; Encourage people to drink sensibly and responsibly; Maintaining a healthier lifestyle in the workforce.

19 Of course, not everyone is happy…

20 Food; Physical activity; Alcohol; Workplace; Behaviour change. Responsibility Deal Networks And it is challenging for industry: Salt reduction; Salt reduction; Trans fats; Trans fats; Nutrition information in catering; Nutrition information in catering; Calories and portions; Calories and portions; Saturated fat; Saturated fat; Boosting fruit ‘n’ veg intakes; Boosting fruit ‘n’ veg intakes; Promotions; Promotions; Education and behaviour change; Education and behaviour change; Evaluation and monitoring. Evaluation and monitoring.

21 The UK food and drink manufacturing sector has shown real leadership in responding to society’s concerns about the health of the nation; Our members are prepared to step up to the plate and make a positive contribution to the Responsibility Deal; Recent history demonstrates that the best outcomes come through partnership between industry, Government and others. Some final thoughts

22 Thank you for listening


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