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Adding Details When you support your ideas with details, your readers are able to visualize and understand what you are expressing.

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Presentation on theme: "Adding Details When you support your ideas with details, your readers are able to visualize and understand what you are expressing."— Presentation transcript:

1 Adding Details When you support your ideas with details, your readers are able to visualize and understand what you are expressing.

2 Adding Details When you support your ideas with details, your readers are able to visualize and understand what you are expressing. The water was great on my forehead. What is missing from these sentences? Dogs are great pets.

3 Adding Details Notice how adding details makes these sentences clearer and provides support for the writer’s ideas. When you support your ideas with details, your readers are able to visualize and understand what you are expressing. The water was great on my forehead. Dogs are great pets. ORIGINAL The refreshing water felt cool and soothing on my aching forehead. REVISED Dogs make the best pets because they bark to warn of danger, they love to play, and they are waiting to greet you when you return home. REVISED

4 Adding Details When you add details, you provide important information about the main idea or give readers a clearer picture of the characters in your story.

5 Adding Details Similes and Metaphors Examples Facts and Statistics Reasons You can add details in a variety of ways. Click on the way you want to explore. Sensory Details Menu

6 Adding Details Sensory Details Sight Sound Touch Taste Smell blue scream silky bitter burnt round whisper rough spicy perfumed shimmering water rustle of leaves as soft as a kitten as sweet as hot chocolate like pine needles Sensory details are words and phrases that appeal to the five senses. You use them to help readers experience something in the same way you experienced it.

7 Adding Details Sensory details are words and phrases that appeal to the five senses. You use them to help readers experience something in the same way you experienced it. Sensory Details Sight Sound Touch Taste Smell blue scream silky bitter burnt round whisper rough spicy perfumed shimmering water rustle of leaves as soft as a kitten as sweet as hot chocolate like pine needles

8 Adding Details Identify the sensory details in this paragraph. Sensory Details sightsoundtouchtastesmell The stage was a rainbow of colors. Scenery of green, orange, blue, and lavender made the dull brown walls disappear. The shimmering costumes glistened under the bright lights. The audience could not tell if the sweet aroma drifting from the stage was real or imaginary. The scent was so powerful that our mouths began to water and I tasted strawberries. Suddenly, as if to take our minds off the fragrance in the air, violins played the opening measures of a song. I felt my heart begin to beat faster. The actors swayed and sang to the music. The play had begun.

9 Adding Details Identify the sensory details in this paragraph. Sensory Details sightsoundtouchtastesmell The stage was a rainbow of colors. Scenery of green, orange, blue, and lavender made the dull brown walls disappear. The shimmering costumes glistened under the bright lights. The audience could not tell if the sweet aroma drifting from the stage was real or imaginary. The scent was so powerful that our mouths began to water and I tasted strawberries. Suddenly, as if to take our minds off the fragrance in the air, violins played the opening measures of a song. I felt my heart begin to beat faster. The actors swayed and sang to the music. The play had begun.

10 Adding Details Identify the sensory details in this paragraph. Sensory Details sightsoundtouchtastesmell The stage was a rainbow of colors. Scenery of green, orange, blue, and lavender made the dull brown walls disappear. The shimmering costumes glistened under the bright lights. The audience could not tell if the sweet aroma drifting from the stage was real or imaginary. The scent was so powerful that our mouths began to water and I tasted strawberries. Suddenly, as if to take our minds off the fragrance in the air, violins played the opening measures of a song. I felt my heart begin to beat faster. The actors swayed and sang to the music. The play had begun.

11 Adding Details Identify the sensory details in this paragraph. Sensory Details sightsoundtouchtastesmell The stage was a rainbow of colors. Scenery of green, orange, blue, and lavender made the dull brown walls disappear. The shimmering costumes glistened under the bright lights. The audience could not tell if the sweet aroma drifting from the stage was real or imaginary. The scent was so powerful that our mouths began to water and I tasted strawberries. Suddenly, as if to take our minds off the fragrance in the air, violins played the opening measures of a song. I felt my heart begin to beat faster. The actors swayed and sang to the music. The play had begun.

12 Adding Details Identify the sensory details in this paragraph. Sensory Details The stage was a rainbow of colors. Scenery of green, orange, blue, and lavender made the dull brown walls disappear. The shimmering costumes glistened under the bright lights. The audience could not tell if the sweet aroma drifting from the stage was real or imaginary. The scent was so powerful that our mouths began to water and I tasted strawberries. Suddenly, as if to take our minds off the fragrance in the air, violins played the opening measures of a song. I felt my heart begin to beat faster. The actors swayed and sang to the music. The play had begun. sightsoundtouchtastesmell

13 Adding Details Identify the sensory details in this paragraph. Sensory Details The stage was a rainbow of colors. Scenery of green, orange, blue, and lavender made the dull brown walls disappear. The shimmering costumes glistened under the bright lights. The audience could not tell if the sweet aroma drifting from the stage was real or imaginary. The scent was so powerful that our mouths began to water and I tasted strawberries. Suddenly, as if to take our minds off the fragrance in the air, violins played the opening measures of a song. I felt my heart begin to beat faster. The actors swayed and sang to the music. The play had begun. sightsoundtouchtastesmell

14 Adding Details A simile is a comparison of unlike things and uses the words like or as. Similes and Metaphors

15 Adding Details A simile is a comparison of unlike things and uses the words like or as. Similes and Metaphors The stage was as colorful as a rainbow.

16 Adding Details A simile is a comparison of unlike things and uses the words like or as. Similes and Metaphors The stage was as colorful as a rainbow. A metaphor directly compares two unlike things and does not use like or as.

17 Adding Details A simile is a comparison of unlike things and uses the words like or as. Similes and Metaphors The stage was as colorful as a rainbow. A metaphor directly compares two unlike things and does not use like or as. The stage spotlight was a bright sun.

18 Adding Details What are the simile and metaphor in this paragraph? Similes and Metaphors similemetaphor Lake Pleasant is loveliest just before the sun sets. The waves move gently onto the shore, and a warm breeze brings the scent of flowers. The water is a mirror filled with the reflections of clouds. When the darkness falls, the water rests as still as glass.

19 Adding Details What are the simile and metaphor in this paragraph? Similes and Metaphors similemetaphor Lake Pleasant is loveliest just before the sun sets. The waves move gently onto the shore, and a warm breeze brings the scent of flowers. The water is a mirror filled with the reflections of clouds. When the darkness falls, the water rests as still as glass.

20 Adding Details What are the simile and metaphor in this paragraph? Similes and Metaphors similemetaphor Lake Pleasant is loveliest just before the sun sets. The waves move gently onto the shore, and a warm breeze brings the scent of flowers. The water is a mirror filled with the reflections of clouds. When the darkness falls, the water rests as still as glass.

21 Adding Details What are the simile and metaphor in this paragraph? Similes and Metaphors similemetaphor Lake Pleasant is loveliest just before the sun sets. The waves move gently onto the shore, and a warm breeze brings the scent of flowers. The water is a mirror filled with the reflections of clouds. When the darkness falls, the water rests as still as glass.

22 Adding Details What are the simile and metaphor in this paragraph? Similes and Metaphors similemetaphor Lake Pleasant is loveliest just before the sun sets. The waves move gently onto the shore, and a warm breeze brings the scent of flowers. The water is a mirror filled with the reflections of clouds. When the darkness falls, the water rests as still as glass. Notice that “water is a mirror” creates a comparison but does not use like or as.

23 Adding Details An example is used to show what the whole is like. Examples

24 Adding Details A sports center could solve our soccer league’s problems, such as a too-small field, being forced to practice in an empty parking lot, and the lack of a permanent playing field with goal posts. What are the examples in this paragraph? An example is used to show what the whole is like. Examples

25 Adding Details A sports center could solve our soccer league’s problems, such as a too-small field, being forced to practice in an empty parking lot, and the lack of a permanent playing field with goal posts. Notice how examples identify the specific problems faced by the soccer league. An example is used to show what the whole is like. Examples

26 Adding Details Some books include several different writing forms. Which terms in this sentence should be made clearer with examples? An example is used to show what the whole is like. Examples

27 Adding Details Some books include several different writing forms. Which terms in this sentence should be made clearer with examples? An example is used to show what the whole is like. Examples

28 Adding Details An example is used to show what the whole is like. Examples Some books include several different writing forms. ORIGINAL Some books, such as my reading and social studies textbooks, include several different writing forms, like short stories, essays, and biographies. REVISED

29 Adding Details A fact is a statement that can be proved. A statistic is a fact expressed in numbers. Statistics explain the significance of facts. Facts and Statistics

30 Adding Details A fact is a statement that can be proved. A statistic is a fact expressed in numbers. Statistics explain the significance of facts. Facts and Statistics Fact: The first CD was made near Hanover, Germany, on August 17, Statistic: Since 1982, more than 200 billion CDs have been sold.

31 Adding Details A statistic can often be used to add details to a fact. Facts and Statistics Plant-eaters from the late Jurassic and Cretaceous periods were huge. How could statistics help you better understand how big the largest dinosaurs were?

32 Adding Details A statistic can often be used to add details to a fact. Facts and Statistics Plant-eaters from the late Jurassic and Cretaceous periods could be 115–130 feet long and weigh between 80–100 metric tons. This statistic clarifies the length and weight of the biggest dinosaurs.

33 Adding Details A statistic can often be used to add details to a fact. Facts and Statistics A lot of people in our community think fast-food restaurants should not be built near schools. Students choose to eat fast food more often than healthy food. These choices lead to poor eating habits and weight gain. The number of young people who are overweight is alarming. What vague words could be replaced with facts and statistics to make this argument stronger?

34 Adding Details A statistic can often be used to add details to a fact. Facts and Statistics A lot of people in our community think fast-food restaurants should not be built near schools. Students choose to eat fast food more often than healthy food. These choices lead to poor eating habits and weight gain. The number of young people who are overweight is alarming. What vague words could be replaced with facts and statistics to make this argument stronger?

35 Adding Details Facts and Statistics A statistic can often be used to add details to a fact. Notice how adding statistics strengthens the argument in this paragraph. In our community, almost 90 percent of the people that I asked think fast-food restaurants should not be built near schools. Students choose to eat fast food more often than healthy food. These choices lead to poor eating habits and weight gain. The number of young people who are overweight is alarming. According to a study done by the National Bureau of Economic Research, there is a 5.2 percent increase in obesity in students whose schools are near fast-food restaurants than in students whose schools are not near fast-food restaurants. REVISED

36 Adding Details Reasons are the “why” behind your statements. They support your main idea and help readers believe what you are writing. When you revise, be sure every reason is supported with enough detail. Reasons

37 Adding Details Students in public schools should be required to wear uniforms. Parents and teachers prefer uniforms to everyday clothes. Students won’t get in trouble for wearing certain clothing, and uniforms cost less. Also, teachers say uniforms will be less distracting, and so students will learn more. What is the reason provided in this paragraph? What details support the reason? Reasons are the “why” behind your statements. They support your main idea and help readers believe what you are writing. When you revise, be sure every reason is supported with enough detail. Reasons

38 Adding Details Students in public schools should be required to wear uniforms. Parents and teachers prefer uniforms to everyday clothes. Students won’t get in trouble for wearing certain clothing, and uniforms cost less. Also, teachers say uniforms will be less distracting, and so students will learn more. What is the reason provided in this paragraph? What details support the reason? Reasons are the “why” behind your statements. They support your main idea and help readers believe what you are writing. When you revise, be sure every reason is supported with enough detail. Reasons


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