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1 Pre-Assessment for Quarter 1 Reading Informational Text Grade.

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1 1 Pre-Assessment for Quarter 1 Reading Informational Text Grade

2 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 2 Important Information A.This booklet is divided into two parts… 1.Teacher’s Resources a.Page 1 – 9 2.Student’s Assessment (to be printed in a booklet form) b.Pages 10 – 20 B.This booklet is intended for pre-assessing reading informational standards RI 1, 2 and 3 at the beginning of the first quarter. Do NOT allow students to read the passages before the assessment. C.Student scores can be recorded on the class Learning Progressions Checklists. Each correct selected response is one point. Each constructed response is a maximum of 3 points. Constructed response points should be added to the learning progression adjustment point the question is targeting. Printing Instructions… Decide on the primary way to use this booklet, then choose one of the following ways to print this material. You can just print this entire 20 pages – then divide it into the two sections to use.OR… You might do the following by sending them to your Print Shop: Print Shop instructions… Print pages 9 – 20 in booklet format. Set print driver properties to - - Original size 8 ½ x 11 Paper size = 11x17 Print type = Booklet

3 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 3 Directions for Pre-Assessment Students read selections independently without reading assistance. Students complete the selected response answers by shading in the bubble. Students complete the constructed response answers by writing a response for each question. Note: The constructed response questions do NOT assess writing proficiency and should not be scored as such. The constructed responses are evidence of reading comprehension. Remind students to STOP on the stop page. Do not allow them to go on to the “happy face” page until you have scored their answers. When scoring.... When students have finished the entire pre-assessment mark each selected response question as correct or incorrect. When students have completed the constructed response, score ONLY with a number from 0 – 3. DO NOT write recommendations for the student about why a score was incorrect in their test booklet. It is important for students to reflect on their own answers after the tests are scored on the reflection sheet (last page of student booklet). Return the scored booklets to the students. On the selected response questions students color happy faces green if their answers were correct or red if they were not correct. Students color the number square blue that shows their constructed response points. The last page in the student booklet is a reflection page. This last page activity is invaluable for understanding how to differentiate student instructional needs. Present ONE specific question for students to reflect on concerning incorrect answers. They can do this on their own, with a peer or with a teacher. Example reflections questions might include: What did you not understand about the question? Underline words you did not understand. Rewrite the question to reflect what you think it is asking.

4 4 Quarter One Pre-Assessment Reading Informational Text Learning Progressions with Adjustment Points (in purple). The Adjustment Points (in purple) are the specific pre-assessed key skills. Quarter One Pre-Assessment Reading Informational Text Learning Progressions with Adjustment Points (in purple). The Adjustment Points (in purple) are the specific pre-assessed key skills.

5 5 selected response Record student pre-assessment selected response scores on class sheets for instructional adjustments. The first quarter CFA score will be recorded in the last column as a comprehensive score. RL.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well inferences drawn from the text. End Goal Example Constructed Response: Grade 6 Path to DOK - 1Path to DOK - 2 End Goal DOK Guide  DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 - Ch DOK 2 -CjDOK 2 - ClStandard Path to DOK 2 Reading Literature CCSS Learning Progressions Locate basic facts as textual evidence. Define: analysis, textual evidence, inferences, explicitly and cite. Explain who, what, where, when or how when citing text. Explain why evidence explicitly shown in text supports analysis of what the text says. Make basic (explicit) inferences drawn from the text. Locate information to support analysis of explicit- implicit inferences. RL.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well Student NAME RI6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. End Goal Example Constructed Response: Grade 6 Path to DOK - 1Path to DOK - 2 End Goal DOK Guide  DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CdDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 - ChDOK 2 - CiDOK 2 - CkDOK 2 - ClStandard Path to DOK 2 Reading Literature CCSS Learning Progressions Locate or recall particular details about a central idea. Define (understand terms): central idea, key details, summary, personal opinions and judgments. Identify particular details supporting a central idea (as discussed in class). Describe or explain particular details using who, what, where, when or how that support a central idea. Explain the relationship of how the central idea of a text is conveyed through particular details in general (concept). Provide a summary of the text using key details. The summary should be distinct from personal opinions or judgments. Identify the central ideas of a text using particular details. Locate specifically asked for information about a central idea using particular details. RI6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. Student NAME RI6.3 Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes). End Goal Example Constructed Response: Grade 6 Path to DOK - 1Path to DOK - 2Path to DOK - 3 End Goal DOK Guide  DOK 1 - KaDOK 1 - KcDOK 1 - CfDOK 2 - CkDOK 2 - ClDOK 2 - ANrDOK 3 - CuDOK 3 - APxDOK 3 SYHStandard Path to DOK 2,3,4 Reading Literature CCSS Learning Progressions Recall key details, basic facts, definitions and events in a text. Define: key, analyze, elaborate, individual, anecdotes, illustrated, introduced Answers who, what, where, when or how when questions using specific details (about individuals, events or ideas in a text). Identify key events, individuals or ideas in a text. Locate specific example of how an event, individual or idea is introduced in the text. Analyze the organization of key events, individuals or ideas in a text (through introduction, illustration and elaboration). Organize key event examples of introductions as they are presented in a text. Organize key event examples of elaborations and illustrations as they are presented in a text. List examples or anecdotes of how in individual is introduced in a text. List examples or anecdotes of how an event or idea is elaborated on in text. Students analyze in detail an event, idea or individual. Students provide details about the introduction, illustration and elaboration. RI6.3 Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes). Student NAME Sample of Learning Progression Checklists

6 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 6 SBAC Reading Assessment Constructed Response General Template Short Constructed Response Short constructed response sample questions are designed to assess CCLS reading standards. These are single questions that ask students to respond to a prompt or question by stating their answer and providing textual evidence to support their answer. The goal of the short response questions is to require students to succinctly show their ability to comprehend text. In responding to these questions, students will be expected to write in complete sentences.

7 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 7 11.Read these details: a. Scientists receive signals from radio transmitters attached to animals. b Satellites relay information from the signals. c. Signals are received from thousands of migrating animals. Identify and explain the central idea of these particular details. Scoring [Notes:] note: This is “teacher talk” or what a teacher would like to see. Students should connect the idea of satellites, signals, transmitters and migration to formulate a purpose or central idea. They should include what each has in common toward the stated goal (i.e., central idea – scientists tracking animals for a reason – to ensure their safety and survival while migrating). These are essential elements of the task and also provide relevant evidence of understanding. Other aspects could include details on how scientists plan to accomplish tracking migrating animals (satellites, the pathway of signal transmissions through NASA and then to scientists, etc...). Details and explanations are consistently connected to the central idea. Sentences are consistent in length with the explicitness of the information student has provided. Constructed Response Answer Key RI.6.2 DOK-2 Ck Identify the central ideas of a text using particular details.

8 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 8 12.Analyze how the author helps the reader understand the idea that tracking migrating animals could impact their survival. Use examples from the passage in your analysis. Scoring [Notes:] Students should use examples from the passage to explain why scientists feel they need to study migration. Responses should center around specific reasons stated by the author that could convince a reader that tracking migrating animals is necessary. These are essential elements to this task. Other aspects might include ways scientists plan to use technology (i.e., how transmitters and satellites work). Relevant pieces of evidence from the passage are details that support the central idea (animals travel long distances, they are decreasing in number). Students consistently stay on topic. Sentences vary in length and structure for giving a clearer understanding of the task. RI.6.3 DOK-3 APx analyze in detail an event, idea or individual. Students provide details about the introduction, illustration and elaboration Constructed Response Answer Key

9 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 9 Quarter 1 Pre-Assessment Selected Response Answer Key

10 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 10 Pre-Assessment for Quarter 1 Reading Informational Text Name ____________________ Grade

11 11 Animals on the Move A flock of geese flies gracefully overhead. You wish you could see the world as they see it. You wish you could fly and be as free as they are. You wonder where they are going in such a hurry! Well, don't envy them too much, because they may be on a very long, tiring journey. Many geese and other birds migrate thousands of miles every year. Some travel over 7,000 miles one way! Some may travel up to 1,000 miles without even a rest stop, crossing the Gulf of Mexico or the Sahara Desert. These birds must follow their food supply and they must return to certain locations to breed. They Migrate to Survive! Besides birds, some other long-distance travelers are fish, sea turtles, bears, caribou, whales, and porpoises. Some of these kinds of animals are shrinking in population. Some are in danger of disappearing forever. Scientists want to know what is happening to them and why. As part of the answer, they want to know where the animals go, how they get there, and how long they stay. A good way to learn about animals is to track them from space. Scientists pick individual animals and fit them with lightweight, comfortable radio transmitters. Signals from the transmitters are received by special instruments on certain satellites as they pass overhead. These satellites are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The polar orbits of the satellites let them see nearly every part of Earth as it rotates below and receive signals from thousands of migrating animals. After the satellite gets the signal from the animal's transmitter, it relays the information to a ground station. The ground station then sends the information to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Goddard then sends the information about the animal to the scientists, wherever they may be. Tracking migrating animals using satellites may help us figure out how to make their journeys as safe as possible and help them survive. Animals on the Move

12 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 12 Name ______________ 1.Why does the author say we shouldn’t envy geese? A.We wish to be as free as they are. B.They must find food. C.They are in for a long, tiring journey. D.They cross the Gulf of Mexico or the Sahara Desert. RI.6.1 DOK – 1 Cf Explain who, what, where, when or how when citing text Which statement best explains why scientist are studying migration patterns of animals? A.To trace their food supply and breeding locations. B.Scientists want to know what is happening to them and why. C.Scientists want to know how far migrating animals travel. D.Some animals migrate thousands of miles every year. RI.6.1 DOK -2 Cj Make basic (explicit) inferences drawn from the text. 2

13 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 13 3.Why might the author have mentioned fish, sea turtles, bears and other animals in this passage? A.Geese fly but other animals walk or swim to travel. B.The author mentions other animals they are studying. C.Scientists want to know where all of the animals go. D.The author wants the reader to know that geese are not the only animal that migrates. RI.6.1 DOK – 2 Cl Locate information to support analysis of explicit- implicit inferences What details from the passage best support the idea that migration is long-distance? A.Many geese and other birds migrate thousands of miles ever year. Some may travel up to 1,000 miles without even a rest stop. B.Some animals travel while others stay in one location. C.Geese have a long tiring journey. You wonder where they are going in such a hurry! D.Scientist want to know how animals get to a new location and how long they stay. RI.6.2 DOK – 2 Cf Describe or explain particular details using who, what, where, when or how that support a central idea. 4

14 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 6. What sentence would be an appropriate addition for paragraph four? A.Sea turtles, whales and porpoises are ocean migrating animals. B.What is it about migrating birds and animals that increase their likelihood of becoming an endangered species? C.There may be several methods of tracking migrating animals. D.Although migrating animals often travel long distances, it is necessary for their survival Which statement best summarizes why animals migrate? A.Animals migrate each year to different locations and stay for long periods of time. B.Caribou, whale and porpoises are some of the animals that migrate each year. C.Many birds and other animals also migrate each year. D.Animals migrate to follow their food supply and some must return to certain locations to breed. RI.6.2 DOK-2 Provide a summary of the text using key details. The summary should be distinct from personal opinions or judgments. 5 RI.6.2 DOK-2 Cj Identify the central ideas of a text using particular details. 6

15 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond What is a key component of scientists being able to track migrating animals by satellite? A.Scientists need to be able to track animals from space. B.Migrating animals are fitted with radio transmitters. C.NOAA is an organization that helps track migrating animals. D.Scientists want to know where animals go, how they get there and how long they stay. RI.6.3 DOK-2 Ck Identify key events, individuals or ideas in a text What happens after a satellite receives a signal? A.NASA sends the information to the scientists. B.The ground station sends information to NASA. C.The transmitter sends a signal. D.The satellite relays information to a ground station. RI.6.3 DOK – 1 Cl Locate specific examples of how an event, individual or idea is introduced, elaborated or illustrated on in a text. 8

16 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond What example best elaborates on the idea that satellite transmissions may help migrating animals survive? A.Scientists study animals to make sure they can migrate safely. B.If scientists know where animals go and how they get there using satellite transmission, food sources could be traced and studied. This might help scientists understand if there is enough food for their long journey. C.Many animals are shrinking in population. If animals shrink in population they become endangered species. Satellites can’t track an endangered species. D.Satellites are made by NASA and have many purposes. One purpose is to track animals. RI.6.3 DOK-3 Cu List examples or anecdotes of how an individual, event or idea is introduced, illustrated or elaborated on in a text How does the author introduce and prepare the reader for the idea of tracking migrating animals from space? A.In order to know where migrating animals go, how they get there and how long they stay, scientist can track them from space. B.Tracking animals may help scientists help animals stay safe and survive. C.Animals can wear transmitters to help satellites track them from space. D.Animals travel long distances as they migrate. Some kinds of animals are shrinking in population. RI.6.3 DOK-3 APx Students analyze in detail an event, idea or individual. Students provide details about the introduction, illustration and elaboration. 10

17 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Read these details: a. Scientists receive signals from animal transmitters. b Satellites relay information from the signals. c. Signals are received from thousands of migrating animals. Identify and explain the central idea of these particular details. 12. Analyze how the author helps the reader understand the idea that tracking migrating animals could impact their survival. Use examples from the passage in your analysis.

18 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond 18 STOP Close your books and wait for instructions!

19 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond Standard RI.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as drawing inferences from the text. DOK 1 - Cf I can cite the text to explain who, what, when, where or why. DOK 2 - Cj I can infer what the text means using details from the text. DOK 2 - Cl I can locate information to explain an inference. DOK 2 – Cj I can summarize a text with facts and not opinion. DOK 2 - Cl I can use details to identify a main or central idea. Standard RI.6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. DOK 2 - Cf I can find details that support a specific main idea. DOK 1 - Cl I can locate specific examples of an event illustrated in a text. DOK 2 - Ck I can identify key events, individuals or ideas in a text. DOK 3 – APx I can analyze in detail how an author introduces a key idea or event. Standard RI.6.3 Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes). DOK 3 – Cu I can identify a set of examples of how an idea is elaborated on in a text. Name _________________ Color the happy face green if your answer was correct or red if your answer was incorrect. Quarter One CFA Pre-Assessment Informational Text – Important Adjustment Points DOK – 2 Ck Color your score blue Read these details: a. Scientists receive signals from animal transmitters. b Satellites relay information from the signals. c. Signals are received from thousands of migrating animals. Identify and explain the central idea of these particular details Analyze how the author helps the reader understand the idea that tracking migrating animals could impact their survival. Use examples from the passage in your analysis DOK – 3 APx Color your score blue.

20 Rev. Control: 08/01/2013 HSD – OSP and Susan Richmond


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