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VALUE – ADDED 101 Ken Bernacki and Denise Brewster.

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Presentation on theme: "VALUE – ADDED 101 Ken Bernacki and Denise Brewster."— Presentation transcript:

1 VALUE – ADDED 101 Ken Bernacki and Denise Brewster

2 A Typical Classroom  Beginning of a new school year. Welcome each student and you know the differences among them are likely profound.  Reasons for discrepancies are many.  Accountable for the progress the students make in your classroom. Below. At. Above.  Educator’s role is to take students wherever they are and add value to their lives.

3 ACHIEVEMENT vs. PROGRESS How are they similar? How are they different?

4 ACHIEVEMENT MEASURES STUDENTS’ PERFORMANCE AT A SINGLE POINT IN TIME RELATES TO STUDENTS’ FAMILY BACKGROUND COMPARES STUDENTS’ PERFORMANCE TO A STANDARD CRITICAL TO STUDENTS’ POST SECONDARY OPPORTUNITIES

5 PROGRESS MEASURES STUDENTS’ PROGRESS BETWEEN TWO POINTS IN TIME NOT RELATED TO STUDENTS’ FAMILY BACKGROUND COMPARE STUDENTS’ PERFORMANCE TO THEIR OWN PRIOR PERFORMANCE CRITICAL TO ENSURING STUDENTS’ FUTURE ACADEMIC SUCCESS

6 ACHIEVEMENT AND PROGRESS A MORE COMPLETE PICTURE OF STUDENT LEARNING. BY MEASURING STUDENTS’ ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND THE PROGRESS THEY ARE MAKING, SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS WILL HAVE A MORE ROBUST, COMPREHENSIVE PICTURE OF THEIR EFFECTIVENESS

7 Measuring Student Progress Why is measuring student progress important? It provides a clearer view of the impact a school has on student academic performance. Without progress measures, schools that produce little academic growth can be ranked higher than schools that produce significant growth.

8 Student A –Red Line Proficient – Green Line Student B – Blue Line

9 Student A (Red) 96% -3 rd Grade 88% - 4 th Grade 80% - 5 th Grade Still above the proficiency bar but performance is declining relative to the proficiency bar.

10 Student B (Blue) 3 rd Grade – 13 th Percentile 4 th Grade – 27 th Percentile 5 th Grade – 49 th Percentile Making significant progress but still below the proficiency bar. Progress is devalued. Below proficient, but making progress in the right direction.

11 Accountability Systems Schools and district success are based upon solely percentages of their students who are proficient. In this system-Student A and his/her school are considered successful. Student B and his/her school are considered failures. This completely ignores an important reality associated with each of the schools. Accountability systems must recognize both achievement and progress if a fair evaluation of schools is desired.

12 VALUE-ADDED DATA In addition to providing information on student progress, value-added data can be used to project future academic performance. These projections can be used for: Identify at-risk students Students with additional challenges Enrichment Intervention

13 Student B’s projected growth in math (above) shows, that while he/she is currently not proficient as a 5 th grader, he/she is projected to be proficient by the end of the 6 th grade.

14 The Benefits of Value-Added Analysis Value-added analysis provides a reliable, objective measure of a school’s influence on student growth.

15 With value-added information Teachers are better able to: Monitor students’ progress – from low-achieving to high-achieving students-ensuring growth opportunities for all students. Modify instruction to address all students’ needs Align professional development efforts in the areas of greater need

16 District administrators and principals are better able to: Measure the impact of educational practices, classroom curricula, instructional methods and professional development on student achievement Make better-informed, data driven decisions about where to focus resources to help students make greater progress and perform at higher levels Benchmark progress against other districts and schools Identify best practices and implement more effective programs for their student population

17 Project SOAR Ohio’s Value-Added System

18 Ohio’s System Operated by the Ohio Department of Education Begins as a grade 4 pilot in 2006 in all districts and community schools Provides analysis in math and reading, grades 4-8 Uses only state achievement test data Uses the mean gain model Expected growth is set by the State Board of Education

19 EVAAS Data base for District, Building, Teacher, and Student level of Value-added. Applies the most sophisticated statistical methodology available to ensure reliability. Allows for the use of all student test data. Provides valuable diagnostic information. Accommodates different types of test data. Used statewide in Tennessee for more than 10 years.

20 REVIEW OF WEST GEAUGA LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICT VALUE-ADDED

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30 District Information on EVAAS -Log-in Required

31 Value-Added Questions Check - In

32 Q: Why is measuring both achievement and progress important?

33 A: Achievement measures provide a snapshot of student performance at a single point in time. Progress measures provide an assessment of student growth from year to year. By combining achievement and progress information, teachers, schools and districts have a more robust, comprehensive picture of their impact on student learning.

34 Q: How can value-added information help educators improve teaching and learning?

35 A: Value-added analysis provides important diagnostic information that was not previously available with traditional achievement reporting. This information allows educators to access their impact on student learning and engage in conversations about the efficacy of the current curriculum, instructional practices and programs. Value-added information also allows educators to project the future performance of students to identify those who need additional support

36 Q: Is it possible to show progress with all groups of students – special education, gifted, and low- performing?

37 A: Yes, the EVAAS value-added methodology is sensitive enough to measure growth with all of these subgroups of students if the end-of-the-year tests that students take meet three criteria. First, these test must have enough “stretch” to differentiate the achievement levels of both low- and high- achieving students. Second, the tests must have appropriate levels of reliability. Third, the test must be highly correlated with the curriculum that teachers teach.

38 Q: The value-added methodology seems complicated. How can people understand the measure?

39 A: While the statistical methodology used for value-added analysis is complex, the information produced is valid, reliable and presented in easy-to-read charts and graphs. The EVAAS value- added methodology can be compared to any complex statistical process. For example, few people understand how to calculate the Consumer Price Index, but many people take advantage of the information and use it to make decisions in their daily lives. If educators learn to trust the information derived from the value- added reports, they can use the information to make sound decisions about improving student achievement.

40 Q: Does value-added analysis require additional testing?

41 A: No new testing is required. Value- added analysis uses existing standardized and state-produced criterion to produce progress reports as long as these tests are administered routinely on a yearly basis.

42 Q: How can teachers be innovative or creative if students progress is based on test scores?

43 A: The value-added approach was developed to estimate each student’s academic growth over his/her school year in each subject. It does not suggest a particular method of producing this growth. Thus, teachers can and must be flexible, innovative and creative in their approaches to move all students towards higher levels of achievement. The methods teachers use to help their students are still left to their professional judgment.

44 Q: Do socioeconomic or other demographic factors of a school’s student population impact progress?

45 A: Leading experts have shown student demographic variables have no significant relationship with student progress measures. This is because value-added analysis measures the change in student growth over time (i.e., year to year), and factors that remain relatively constant over time, such as socioeconomic status, cannot account for the changes in student growth that students regularly experience.

46 Q: Where can you find more information about value-added analysis?

47 A: For additional information about value-added analysis and professional development opportunities and resources, contact Battelle for Kids at (614) or visit

48 DVD Value-Added Overview from Battelle


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