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How many ways are there to tie your shoe laces? (6 eyes per side)

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Presentation on theme: "How many ways are there to tie your shoe laces? (6 eyes per side)"— Presentation transcript:

1 How many ways are there to tie your shoe laces? (6 eyes per side)

2 Burkard Polster, Australian Mathematician 43,200!

3 “Changing Your Cultural Thinking”

4 “Sharpening your saw”

5 Objectives for Today Understand the changes we faced Recognise need to change How we can all play a part in improving the customer experience Understand customer expectations and the impact of emotion Identify where we can improve as a team Recap on our values Recognise how we can improve our impression How to apply the magic recipe for success Understand what is in it for me Make three personal commitments

6 Objectives for Today Understand the changes we faced Recognise need to change How we can all play a part in improving the customer experience Understand customer expectations and the impact of emotion Identify where we can improve as a team Recap on our values Recognise how we can improve our impression How to apply the magic recipe for success Assessing your team Make three personal commitments

7 Come With Us On a Journey…

8 What The Landscape Looks Like

9 The Business Landscape Further prolonged economic uncertainty –“We never learned this in university. Everyone is lost.” Increasing customer expectations Less loyalty and more choice Aggressive competition Offerings very similar –product, facilities, service levels Shorter copy-cat timeframes Cost of differentiation increasing Pressure to reduce costs and improve profitability Focus on growth, market share and ‘bottom line’

10 Employee Landscape Expect more than ‘just the salary’ –Glad to have a job though Expect to be valued as ‘individuals’ Want to be involved and to contribute Increasingly seek good employers and cultures Conscious about employee rights Critical of poor management More likely to speak out than ever before … employees vote with their feet.

11 Customer Landscape Expect more than ‘just the product’ Expect to be respected as an ‘individual’ Seeking the ‘feel good’ factor Highly educated about price, ‘VFM’ and ‘rights’ Less forgiving and more critical Social media savvy Face Book, Twitter, LinkedIn Increasingly experience bland levels of service Increasingly buy ‘brand’ and ‘differentiation’ … customers vote with their feet (and increasingly their mouse clicks.)

12 The Customer’s Experience. What does that really mean?

13 The Customer Experience Defined "The customer experience is the combination of your organisation's tangible performance together with the senses these stimulate and the consequential emotions these trigger in the customer, all instinctively assessed against the customer's own expectations across all the interactions the customer has with your organisation.” or put another way...

14 The Customer Experience Defined “Customer experience is the internal response of an individual to their interactions with an organisation's products, people, processes and environments.” or put another way...

15 The Customer Experience Defined “It's how you're making your customers feel whenever and however they deal with you.”

16 The customer experience must be planned and deliberate. Otherwise it’s left to chance!

17 Customer Expectations

18 Great course Safe rides Clean rooms Healthy animals Efficient process Clean Hot food Prompt service Valued Cared for Interested in Happy Pleased Satisfied Confident Relaxed Engaged

19 “How are we making them feel?”

20 Brand Satisfaction Continuum the impact on loyalty Champions Delight Passive Satisfied Floating Neutral Alienated Dissatisfied 5% shift in customer retention delivers 25% - 100% profit improvement “Beyond My Expectations!!” “It Was What I Expected.” “Not What I Expected. I Was Disappointed” 60 % to 80% defecting customers said they were satisfied to very satisfied just prior to defection ! “You Completely Failed To Meet My Expectations !” Satisfaction - Loyalty Continuum Irritated Hurried Neglected Unhappy Unsatisfied Stressed Disappointed Frustrated Interested Energetic Exploratory Indulgent Stimulated Trusted Valued Focussed Safe Cared for Happy Pleased

21 Working as a team

22 Our Values What are the Woburn values?

23 Our Values Integrity Innovation Community Heritage Excellence

24 Work is theatre

25 Referrals Reduced Costs Price Premium Increased Purchases Base Profit source:zero defections, harvard business review Average Length of Customer Relationship (in Years) Customer Profitability Why ‘customer relationship’ … the value of customer loyalty and increased profit Loyal Customers Stay Longer Buy More Cost Less Pay More Tell Others Loyal Customers Stay Longer Buy More Cost Less Pay More Tell Others

26 The price of birthday cake offerings … the value of customer ‘experiences’ Commodities £1.50 Services £25 Goods £4.50 Experiences £175

27 The price of coffee offerings …the value of customer ‘experiences’ source:zero defections, Harvard Business Review £ Commodities Goods Services Experiences

28

29

30 The magic recipe for a great experience

31 Assessing your team

32 Change can be achieved through commitment or compliance Compliance "I have to do it this new way" Reaction "I will react to this change -if I must" Testing "I must absorb this change Negative perception "I feel threatened by this change" Positive perception "I see the opportunity in this change" Engagement "I see the implications for me / us" Understanding "I know why and what will change Awareness "I am being told about something" Testing "I will put myself at stake for this change" Action "I will act to achieve this change" Commitment "I want to do it this new way"

33 SPECTATORS PLAYERS WALKING DEAD CYNICS LowHigh Low High Energy Attitude

34 Moving the tanker

35 You Can’t Light a Fire with a Damp Match!

36 “What we are and who we become is determined by those who love us.” As a child…..

37 “What we are and who we become is determined by those who lead us.” As a business…..

38 Management’s Responsibility directive v supportive Front line staff Supervisors Managers HOB Customers Creating Vision & Values Front line staff Supervisors Managers HOB Customers Supporting & Responsive “Your Customer Experience”

39 You Can’t Light a Fire with a Damp Match!

40 “ to succeed you have to believe in something with such a passion that it becomes a reality ”

41 Customer Capture and Retention working on your bottom lines Senior Executive level to create and communicate vision & values –Strong leadership required Dept. Manager level to create processes, team alignment and commitment and cascade the vision –Strong leadership required Front line level to create expertise and emotional connection through brand oriented action and customer experiences

42 Connecting the Vision HOB/CEO’s vision gives organisation ‘belief’ but often disconnected from the Customer Experience Customer Experience reflects behaviour of your people Behaviour is ‘conditioned’ by commitment and capability of managers the RED LINE ‘line of sight’ Customers

43 Empowerment

44 Not all change initiatives succeed

45 The Reality About Change Programmes 1. Too complex. 2. Failing to build a substantial coalition. 3. Not understanding the need for a clear vision. 4. Failing to clearly communicate the vision. 5. Permitting roadblocks against the vision. 6. Not planning for short term results and not realising them. 7. Declaring victory too soon. 8. Failure to anchor changes in corporate culture. 70% of Change Processes Don't Succeed Professor John Kotter, Harvard Business School

46 The Eight Phases for Change Establish a Sense of Urgency – the context of why Professor John Kotter, Harvard Business School Create a Coalition – champions for the cause Develop a Clear Vision – where are you going, what will it look like? Share the Vision – to all audiences across the business Empower People to Clear Obstacles – get out of their way Secure Short-Term Wins – celebrate success, look for the quick wins Consolidate and Keep Moving – keep the momentum going Anchor the Change – consolidate successes

47 Align every facet to the customer experience

48 The customer journey

49 The voice of the customer has to be heard

50 Engage With Your Customers “ the more you engage with customers the clearer things become and the easier it is to determine what you should be doing” John Russell, President, Harley-Davidson Europe

51 BAIN Consulting, USA Interviewed over 130,000 customers, 400 companies, 28 industries Searched to find a clear, tangible, unambiguous measurement that linked customers experience with growth Loyalty and Business Growth the research

52 “Loyalty is the willingness of someone - a customer, an employee, a friend - to make an investment or personal sacrifice in order to strengthen a relationship. For a customer, that can mean sticking with a supplier who treats him well and gives him good value in the long term even if the supplier does not offer the best price in a particular transaction.” Loyalty is more than simply repeat purchase Loyalty is a state of mind, attitudinal as well as behavioural “Loyalty is the willingness of someone - a customer, an employee, a friend - to make an investment or personal sacrifice in order to strengthen a relationship. For a customer, that can mean sticking with a supplier who treats him well and gives him good value in the long term even if the supplier does not offer the best price in a particular transaction.” Loyalty and Business Growth definition of loyalty

53

54 Referrals Reduced Costs Price Premium Increased Purchases Base Profit source:zero defections, harvard business review Average Length of Customer Relationship (in Years) Customer Profitability Why ‘customer relationship’ … the value of customer loyalty and increased profit Loyal Customers Stay Longer Buy More Cost Less Pay More Tell Others Loyal Customers Stay Longer Buy More Cost Less Pay More Tell Others

55 A Single Question? “How likely are you to recommend us to a friend or colleague?” 0 = Extremely unlikely 5 = Neutral 10 = Extremely likely

56 “How Likely Are You to Recommend Us to a Friend or Colleague?” PROMOTERS % DETRACTORS % Net Promoter Score %

57

58 “All companies should ask their customers the Net Promoter question.”

59 Don’t Just Take Their Word For It Here the views of others “All companies should ask their customers the Net Promoter question.”

60 London School of Economics supports Net Promoter Findings Word of Mouth and Growth in the UK “By finding an empirical link between word of mouth recommendations and sales performance among US companies, the Reichheld study answered two thorny business questions: How do you measure word of mouth? (Answer: the Net-Promoter score). And how do you measure the effect of word of mouth? (Answer: sales uplift).” Dr Paul Marsden, London School of Economics Report Published 05 September 2005 Advocacy Drives Growth Customer Advocacy Drives UK Business Growth

61 “Word of mouth was found to predict sales growth for retail banks, car manufacturers, mobile phone networks and supermarkets in the UK.” “We conclude by suggesting that the Net Promoter score as a measure of word of mouth advocacy may be useful not only in predicting sales growth, but also in predicting share performance and employee productivity. Specifically we propose that three simple questions could predict overall business performance; Likelihood that customers would recommend a company or brand to friends or colleagues. Net Promoter score as a predictor of sales growth. Likelihood that investors would recommend investing in a company to friends or colleagues. Net Promoter score as a predictor of share performance. Likelihood that employees would recommend working for their company to friends or colleagues. Net Promoter score as a predictor of productivity.” Dr Paul Marsden London School of Economics Report Published 05 September 2005 Advocacy Drives Growth Customer Advocacy Drives UK Business Growth

62 London School of Economics Report Published 05 September 2005 Advocacy Drives Growth Customer Advocacy Drives UK Business Growth

63 “In terms of percentage growth, a 7 point increase in word of mouth advocacy (Net-Promoter score) correlated with a 1% increase in growth.” “Every 2% reduction in negative word of mouth correlated to just under 1% growth.” Companies with relatively high Net-Promoter scores (>0), and relatively low negative word of mouth rates ( 25%).

64 Your Community Tools

65 Ideas for keeping employees engaged

66 Engaging Employees Involves Keeping them informed of progress and plans, Celebrating successes Seeking their opinions Encouraging ideas generation and business improvement Running competitions Asking question Motivating and inspiring individuals in their teams Communicating, giving and receiving constructive feedback, delegation, and encouraging support. Enhanced through briefings, suggestion schemes, performance reviews and reward systems, along with day to day management processes such as identifying what motivates specific individuals, spotting people doing things well, and ‘saying thank you’.

67 The ‘Vision’ A meaningful picture of the future that creates focus, direction, passion and commitment.

68 The Woburn Vision What does that really mean?

69 Questions for You Do you have a vision? Are employees ‘excited’ by your vision? Is it communicated in a meaningful and relevant way at every opportunity? Is it more than a poster in reception or a set of financial figures? Are people aware of your progress towards the vision? Does it drive your dealership and departments? Is it revisited, reviewed and reenergised by your leaders regularly?

70 Questions Employees Will Ask How is this ‘vision’ relevant to me? What actually do you want me to do? How will I be measured? What rewards/consequences will I face? What tools and support are available? What’s in it for me? How are we doing? When will we get their? What are the milestones?

71 Our Values Integrity Innovation Community Heritage Excellence

72 Creating the Winning Culture Creating the culture you want starts with assessing the current culture and identifying which aspects of it are we happy/unhappy with. The next step is to establish the culture you want. This often involves spelling out what we want our organisation to be like (it’s an integral element of ‘the vision’). Creating the culture you want can involve a number of key elements: Publishing and living a set of core values Ensuring systems and procedures support the culture we want Establish reward systems that reinforce it Identifying and championing role models throughout the organisation

73 Values can Help: Create the culture you want Provide clear guidelines for acceptable and non acceptable behaviour Reduce game playing and confusion Reinforce and support the external image of the organisation Organisations that truly value their values, use them in the day to day management, recruitment and rewarding of their people

74 Culture Check Are you happy with your organisation’s culture? Do your people act in line with your preferred behaviours and values? Do your reward systems, performance management and operational procedures reinforce and help promote your preferred behaviours and values? Does your organisation ‘Celebrate its Champions’ and ‘Challenge its Challengers’? Do your leaders act as role models and positively reinforce your preferred culture?


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