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Future Hazard Analysis in EN 12845 ‘Occupancy and Storage Classification’ Stuart Lloyd Principal Fire Protection Engineer Zurich Risk Engineering UK.

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Presentation on theme: "Future Hazard Analysis in EN 12845 ‘Occupancy and Storage Classification’ Stuart Lloyd Principal Fire Protection Engineer Zurich Risk Engineering UK."— Presentation transcript:

1 Future Hazard Analysis in EN ‘Occupancy and Storage Classification’ Stuart Lloyd Principal Fire Protection Engineer Zurich Risk Engineering UK

2 Agenda  EN status  The past & current hazard analysis  Moving forward –Non Storage –Storage –Special Hazards 2

3 Status  Current EN issued in 2009 –EN 12845:2004 +A2 –included amendments A1 and A2  Next EN to be published end 2014 –EN Revision 1 (EN 12845:2014)  Future EN –EN Revision 2 –In development –focus of this presentation 3

4 4 January 2008 Occupancy Classification Taken from BS 5306 part (UK) TYPE OF OCCUPANCY Non industrial where the amount and combustibility of the contents is low Commercial and industrial Processing and handling mainly ordinary combustible materials unlikely to develop intensely burning fires in the initial stages Classification - Ordinary Hazard Group I,II,III or IIIS (see table 3) For example, some areas of: Hospitals Hotels Libraries Museums Nursing homes Office buildings Prisons Schools, Colleges, etc Goods storage - with abnormal fire loads likely to produce exceptionally intense fires with a high rate of heat release Process hazards - extra hazardous, likely to develop rapidly and intensely burning fires Attics basements boiler rooms kitchens laundries storage spaces workrooms Category of goods type and height of storage Classification - Ordinary Hazard Group III Classification - High Hazard high piled storage Storage methods S1 to S8 Type S9 or S10 potable spirit stores Classification - High Hazard process hazard Classification – Light Hazard

5 5 TYPE OF OCCUPANCY Non industrial (where the amount and combustibility of the contents is low) Commercial and industrial Processing and handling mainly ordinary combustible materials unlikely to develop intensely burning fires in the initial stages Classification - Ordinary Hazard Group I,II,III,IV For example, some areas of: Hospitals Hotels Libraries Museums Nursing homes Prisons etc Goods storage - with abnormal fire loads likely to produce exceptionally intense fires with a high rate of heat release Process hazards - extra hazardous, likely to develop rapidly and intensely burning fires Attics basements boiler rooms kitchens laundries storage spaces* workrooms Category of goods type and height of storage Classification - Ordinary Hazard Group III, IV Classification - High Hazard high piled storage Storage methods ST1 to ST6 Classification - High Hazard process hazard Classification – Light Hazard HHP 1,2,3,4 *Storage may be High Hazard due to storage height/block size Occupancy Classification (EN & CEA) Developed from text in standards (not illustrated)

6 EN Revision 2 - Simplification of Hazard Classes  Current (10 options) –Light Hazard (LH) –Ordinary Hazard (OH 1,2,3,4) –High Hazard Process (HHP 1,2,3,4) –High Hazard Storage  Future (5 options) –Fire Hazard 1 –Fire Hazard 2 –Fire Hazard 3 –Fire Hazard 4 –High Hazard Storage 6

7 Future Density/Area for each FH  The most widely used density/areas have been adopted going forward 7 Fire HazardOld designationDensity mm/minArea wet m²Area dry m² FH1LH/OH FH2OH2/OH FH3OH4/HHP17, FH4HHP2/HHP312,

8 Non Storage Occupancies 8

9 Clearer Guidance Non-manufacturing example Educational Facilities Universities Schools Colleges Nurseries Prisons Gymnasiums Construction made of concrete or steel, low combustible load, no carpets. FH1 Construction other than concrete or steel, combustible load larger than defined as FH1, Typical technical rooms with hydraulic units less than 100 L, laundries with less than hydraulic units of 100 L FH2 Storage Rooms.HHS  Some aspects based on construction  All aspects based on risk evaluation  Tables identify ‘typical risks’ associated with premise type 9

10 Clearer Guidance Manufacturing example 10 Manufacturing occupancies and their associated Fire Hazard Class continued. OccupancyDescriptionSpecial Consideration Fire Hazard Mechanical Engineering Or Assembling Plant -Sheet metal product factories -Metal working -Electric and Electronics equipment factories - White Appliances factories - Circuit board manufacturing - Car workshops - Fire-lighter manufacture −Water-based emulsion for grinding, drilling, cutting, stamping processes FH2 −injection molding (plastics) for PP/PE/PS or similar plastics −Use of plastic logistic aids (baskets, trays, boxes, pallet, etc..) −Soldering process −Paint application shops with water-based paint −Electrostatic paint application −Process where combustible liquids or cutting oils are used FH3 −Printing works (metal foil) −Paint application shops with solvent −Plating processes −Processes involving corrosive materials requiring plastic piping −Processes using flammable liquids. −Fire-lighter filling process. FH4

11 Storage Classification  Categories will be called HHS  Will include 5 Categories 11

12 Storage – Categories of Goods  Category I and II –will remain unchanged and be called HHS 1 and HHS 2  Category III and IV are being evaluated – will be split into three groups HHS 3, HHS 4 and HHS 5 –HHS 3 - Cartoned Unexpanded Plastics (laptop in box) –HHS 4 – Uncartoned Unexpanded Plastics (garden chair) –HHS 4 – Cartoned Expanded Plastics (pillows in box) –HHS 5 – Uncartoned Expanded Plastics (sheets of polystyrene)  You should think of HHS 4 as Category 3.5  New designations will accommodate protection by proven protection schemes such as CMSA from USA 12

13 Special Hazards  Intended to include specific design solutions –Tyre storage –Aerosols –Hanging garments –Etc…. 13

14 Future Flow Chart 14

15 Thank You, Any Questions? 15


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