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Unit 7: Part A So What’s So Bad About Being So-So?

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1 Unit 7: Part A So What’s So Bad About Being So-So?
21st Century College English: Book 3 Unit 7: Part A So What’s So Bad About Being So-So?

2 Text A: Language Points Exercises Assignment
Unit 7: Part A Pre-reading Activities Text A: Language Points Exercises Assignment So What’s So Bad about Being So-So?

3 Pre-reading Activities
Match the sports in Column A with the playing areas in Column B. Then in Column C, list all the things (equipment, special clothing, etc.) that are necessary to each of the sports. Column A baseball bowling golf running soccer/football tennis Column B alley course court diamond field/pitch track Column C _______________________ bat, ball, shoes, mask, glove/mitt (连指手套) ball, pins, shoes ... ball, clubs, bag, tee (球座), shoes ... shoes, sweatband (吸汗带) ... ball, shoes... ball, racquet (球拍), net, shoes ...

4 Which sport is talked about in the conversation?
Pre-reading Activities Before you listen to the conversation, have a look at the questions below Which sport is talked about in the conversation? What equipment is mentioned? How important is it to you to “do them right”? Check-up

5 Which sport is talked about in the conversation?
Pre-reading Activities Which sport is talked about in the conversation? What equipment is mentioned? How important is it to you to “do them right”? Golf. Golf clubs, bags, balls, tees, shoes, gloves, hats, shirts. Open. Script

6 Pre-reading Activities
S=Salesman R=Rick S: Can I help you, sir? R: Yes, I want to look at some golf equipment. Just the minimum, for a beginner. S: Okay, sir, you’ve come to the right place! We have several excellent brands of golf clubs to choose from, and very fine bags — nothing spoils a game more than a badly-made golf bag! R: But ... S: Then you’ll need balls and tees (T型球座) and the right shoes, of course. You’ll want gloves and a hat, and we also have a very nice selection of golf shirts. R: But I’m not a professional, I just want to play for fun! S: Well, as my mother always said: If you’re going to do it, you might as well do it right.

7 So What’s So Bad about Being So-So?
Language Points Text A: So What’s So Bad about Being So-So? By Lisa Wilson Strick

8 So What’s So Bad about Being So-So?
Language Points So What’s So Bad about Being So-So? by Lisa Wilson Strick 1 The other afternoon I was playing the piano when my seven-year-old walked in. He stopped and listened for a while, then said: “You don’t play that thing very well, do you, Mom?” 2 No, I don’t. My performance would make any serious music student weep, but I don’t care. I’ve enjoyed playing the piano badly for years.

9 Language Points 3 I also enjoy singing badly and drawing badly. I’m not ashamed of my incompetence in these areas. I do one or two other things well and that should be enough for anybody. But it gets boring doing the same things over and over. Every now and then it’s fun to try something new. 4 Unfortunately, doing things badly has gone out of style. It used to be a mark of class if a lady or a gentleman sang a little, painted a little, played the violin a little. You didn’t have to be good at it; the point was to be fortunate enough to have the leisure time for such pursuits. But in today’s competitive world we have to be “experts” even in our hobbies.

10 Language Points 5 You can’t tone up your body by pulling on your gym shoes and jogging around the block a couple of times anymore. Why? Because you’ll be laughed off the street by the “serious runners” — the ones who run twenty miles or more a week in their sixty-dollar running suits and fancy shoes. The shoes are really a big deal. If you say you’re thinking about taking up almost any sport, the first thing the “serious” types will ask is what you plan to do about shoes. Leather or canvas? What type of soles? Which brand? This is not the time to mention that the gym shoes you wore in high school are still in pretty good shape. As far as sports enthusiasts are concerned, if you don’t have the latest shoes you are hopelessly committed to embarrassing yourself.

11 Language Points 6 The runners aren’t nearly so snobbish as the dancers, however. In case you didn’t know, “going dancing” no longer means putting on a pretty dress and doing a few turns around the dance floor with your favorite man on Saturday night. “Dancing” means squeezing into tights and leg warmers, then sweating through six hours of warm-ups, five hours of ballet and four hours of jazz classes. Every week. Never tell anyone that you “like to dance” unless this is the sort of activity you enjoy.

12 Language Points 7 Have you noticed what this is doing to our children? “We don’t want that nerd on our soccer team,” I overheard a ten-year-old complain the other day. “He doesn’t know a goal kick from a head shot.” As it happens, the “nerd” that the boy was talking about was my son, who did not — like some of his friends — start soccer instruction at age three. I’m sorry, Son, I guess I blew it. In my day, when we played baseball, we expected to give a little instruction to the younger kids who didn’t know how to play. It didn’t matter if they were terrible; we weren’t out to slaughter the other team. Sometimes we didn’t even keep score. To us, sports were just a way of having a good time.

13 Language Points 8 I don’t think kids have as much fun as they used to. Competition keeps getting in the way. The daughter of a neighbor is a nervous wreck worrying about getting into the best tennis school. “I was a late starter,” she told me, “and I only get to practice five or six hours a week, so my technique may not be up to their standards.” The child is nine. She doesn’t want to be a tennis player when she grows up; she wants to be a nurse. I asked what she likes to do for fun in her free time. She seemed to think it was an odd question. “Well, I don’t actually have a lot of free time,” she said. “Homework and tennis and piano lessons kind of eat it all up. I have piano lessons three times a week now, so I have a good shot at getting into the all-state orchestra.”

14 Language Points 9 Ambition, drive and the desire to excel are all great within limits, but I don’t know where the limits are anymore. I know a woman who’s been complaining for years that she hasn’t got the time to study a foreign language. I’ve pointed out that an evening course in French or Italian would take only a couple of hours a week, but she keeps putting it off. I suspect that what she hasn’t got the time for is to become completely fluent within one year — and that any lower level of accomplishment would embarrass her. Instead she spends her evenings watching TV and tidying up her closets — occupations at which no particular expertise is expected.

15 Language Points 10 I know lots of other people, too, who avoid activities they might enjoy because they lack the time or the energy to tackle them “seriously.” It strikes me as so silly. We are talking about recreation. I have nothing against self-improvement. But when I hear a teenager muttering “practice makes perfect” as he grimly makes his four-hundred-and-twenty-seventh try at hooking the basketball into the net left-handed, I wonder if some of us aren’t improving ourselves right into the insane asylum.

16 Language Points 11 I think it’s time we put a stop to all this. For sanity’s sake, each of us should vow to take up something new this week — and to make sure we never master it completely. Sing along with grand opera. Make peculiar-looking objects out of clay. I can tell you from experience that a homemade cake still tastes pretty good even if it doesn’t look perfect. The point is to enjoy being a beginner again; to rediscover the joy of creative fooling around. If you find it difficult, ask any two-year-old to teach you. Two-year-olds have a gift for tackling the impossible with enthusiasm; repeated failure hardly discourages them at all.

17 Language Points 12 As for me, I’m getting a little out of shape, so I’m looking into golf. A lot of people I know enjoy it, and it doesn’t look too hard. Given a couple of lessons, I should be stumbling gracelessly around the golf course and playing badly in no time at all.

18 the other afternoon — on the afternoon a few days ago Also: the other day (para.7), the other morning, etc. Examples: • I met a friend from my hometown the other day and we had lunch together. • Have you forgotten what happened the other week?

19 My performance would make any serious music student weep ...
— a. deeply interested; devoted Example: • If you’re serious about becoming an actress, you need proper training. Translate: • A serious learner tends to think independently. Key: 认真的学者趋向于独立思考。 More to learn

20 My performance would make any serious music student weep ...
— v. to shed (tears) as an expression of emotion Cf. cry — Cry and weep both involve the shedding of tears; cry more strongly implies accompanying sound e.g. The baby cried all night, causing another sleepless night for the family. Cf. sob — Sob describes a mixture of broken speech and weeping marked by convulsive (痉挛性的) breathing or gasping e.g. She kept sobbing, as if her heart would break. Example: • The criminal wept bitter tears of regret at the trial.

21 every now and then (every) now and then — sometimes but not very often or regularly Make a sentence with the phrase: • ? Examples: • Now and then my new method appears to work. • I still see her for lunch every now and then, but not as often as I used to.

22 out of style — unfashionable; out of fashion Example: • A style does not go out of style as long as it adapts itself to its period. — Coco Chanel (1883–1971), French couturiere (女服设计师).

23 a mark of class — a symbol of a person’s social position; a characteristic feature which indicates that a person is cultured and civilized Examples: • His shirt was ironed and that was a mark of class. • Wearing a pair of sun glasses in the house is hardly a mark of class.

24 pursuit — n. something that one spends time doing, esp. an activity that one enjoys doing when not working Examples: • Games like chess are rather intellectual pursuits. • She said she didn't have much opportunity for leisure pursuits, but that when she had the time, she liked painting.

25 You can’t tone up your body by pulling on your gym shoes and jogging around the block a couple of times anymore. tone up — (cause to) become stronger Examples: • I lift weights at the gym everyday to tone up my body. • Swimming is the best way to tone up your muscles. More to learn

26 You can’t tone up your body by pulling on your gym shoes and jogging around the block a couple of times anymore. pull on/off — put (clothing, etc.) on/off by pulling Examples: • Help me pull on these boots — they are very tight. • He began to pull off his shirt.

27 you’ll be laughed off the street by the “serious runners”
Translate the sentence: ? Key: 你会受到那些“认真的跑步者”的嘲笑而不敢上街

28 a big deal big deal — often said in a belittling tone or scornfully Example: • So you’ll be the boss of two persons. Big deal! 了不起!你就要当两个人的老板了。

29 take up (an activity, subject, etc.)
— become interested in it and spend time doing it, either as a hobby or as a career Examples: • I thought I’d take up fishing. • He decided to take up a career.

30 in pretty good shape be in (good, bad, etc.) shape — be in (good, bad, etc.) condition Examples: • The house was in absolutely good shape. • She runs 3 miles every day to keep herself in shape.

31 As far as sports enthusiasts are concerned
as far as (sb.) be concerned — in sb.’s opinion Example: • As far as the students are concerned, college life should not be only a period of lessons and tests. More to do

32 As far as sports enthusiasts are concerned
IX. Complete the following sentences, using “as far as … be concerned”. (Ex. IX, p. 208) 1. ___________________ (就我和你母亲而言), your choice of career is your own business. You have nothing to worry about ___________________(就词汇而言), but you need to improve your communication skills if you want to pass the exam.  As far as your mother and I are concerned  as far as vocabulary is concerned More to do

33 As far as sports enthusiasts are concerned
IX. Complete the following sentences, using “as far as … be concerned”. (Ex. IX, p. 208) 3. The restaurant next door has good food, but the place across the street is much better ___________________ (就服务而言). ___________________ (就新的发展计划而言), I feel it needs more discussion.  as far as service is concerned  As far as the new development plan is concerned More to do

34  as far as salary is concerned  As far as I’m concerned
As far as sports enthusiasts are concerned IX. Complete the following sentences, using “as far as … be concerned”. (Ex. IX, p. 208) 5. ___________________ (就新的发展计划而言), I feel it needs more discussion. I don‘t enjoy going to the movies. ___________________ (在我看来), it's just a waste of time.  as far as salary is concerned  As far as I’m concerned

35 commit (sb./sth.) to — put (sb./sth.) in (a state or place) Examples: • The names were committed to memory. • Signing this form commits you to buying the goods. • The man was committed to prison for fraud (诈骗).

36 snobbish — a. 势利的,谄上欺下的 Example: • Americans living in Latin American countries are often more snobbish than the Latins themselves. The typical American has quite a bit of money by Latin American standards, and he rarely sees a countryman who doesn’t. — Hunter S. Thompson (b. 1939), U.S. journalist.

37 in case — In case is used when you are giving a piece of information in order to introduce the reason why you are giving it. Examples: • In case you didn’t know, there are three basic wines: red, white and rose. • Mary, in case you’ve forgotten, hasn’t forgiven you.

38 He doesn’t know a goal kick from a head shot.
Paraphrase the sentence: ? Key: — He is unable to tell the difference between a goal kick and a head shot. Or: He knows nothing about soccer.

39 as it happens (happened)
— by chance; although not planned Translate: 碰巧我有几分钟的空。 Example: • As it happens, I know someone who might be able to give you some advice. Key: As it happened, I had a few minutes to spare.

40 — (infml) do clumsily or badly; mishandle; ruin
blew it — (infml) do clumsily or badly; mishandle; ruin Note: Blow it is often used when you are given an opportunity but you fail to take advantage of it by doing or saying something wrong. Examples: • It was your last chance and you blew it! • I guess I blew it when I turned down the job offer, didn’t I?

41 be out to do/for sth. — want or intend to do/to achieve sth. Examples: • You might feel that they’re out to use your house as a free hotel. • Mark my words — he’s only out for one thing and that’s her money.

42 get in the way — to obstruct or delay the progress of Examples: • She won’t let anything get in the way of her ambitions. • May nothing stand in the way of your future happiness together.

43 a nervous wreck — a person in bad mental condition wreck n. — a person who is physically or mentally broken down or worn out

44 Homework and tennis and piano lessons kind of eat it all up.
— (infml) somewhat; to some extent Note: Kind of is used adverbially when you say that something is partly tree or partly the case but does not fully describe the situation, or if you are uncertain about what you are saying or wondering if you are using the right word. Examples: • Actually, I felt kind of sorry for him. • I kind of thought you might help me. More to learn

45 Homework and tennis and piano lessons kind of eat it all up.
eat up — use or consume in large quantities, often used with time, money, or fuel to mean Examples: • A big car like that eats up petrol. • Rising costs were eating up most of the profits.

46 shot — n. (infml) is an attempt to do or achieve something you have not done before. Examples: • I can’t get the last two answers in this crossword — here, you have a shot. • I thought I’d have a shot at making my own wine since we’ve got all these grapes.

47 drive — n. motivation or urge Examples: • With the drive to survive, he finally walked out of the desert. • The drive to develop western China attracts talents from all over the country.

48 suspect — v. imagine or suppose that sth. exist Examples: • He suspected danger and stopped. Cf. doubt v. — not believe; feel uncertain (about) e.g. I doubt his honesty.

49 occupation — an activity in which you engage habitually, either something that you do for pleasure or as part of your daily life or a job or profession Examples: • Cycling was his favorite occupation. • Everyone, irrespective of age, sex or occupation, is qualified to take part in the game.

50 It strikes me as so silly.
— I think that’s very silly. strike sb. as (adj. / n.) — have an effect on sb. or impress sb. (in the way specified) Examples: • The plan strikes me as ridiculous. • Henry strikes me as a very dull boy.

51 recreation — n. an enjoyable activity in which you exercise your body or mind when not working Examples: • Sport and recreation have always been part of university life. • His favorite recreations are golf and tennis.

52 hooking the basketball
— n. expert knowledge or skill, esp. in a particular field hook — v. to hit or throw in a curving path in such sports as golf, basketball, etc. Example: • Mr. Woods hooked the ball right into the hole.

53 for sanity’s sake — in order to remain mentally healthy sanity — The quality or condition of being sane; soundness of mind

54 Make peculiar-looking objects out of clay.
Cf. peculiar, odd, strange — Peculiar implies marked or conspicuous distinctiveness, odd stresses a departure from the usual, the normal, or the regular, while strange, the most comprehensive of the three words, suggest unfamiliarity. Examples: • This difference arises from the peculiar character of the US government. • Some great men have odd habits. • To most of us the art of India is strange. More to learn

55 Make peculiar-looking objects out of clay.
Cf. clay, soil, mud — Clay is earth that is used to make things such as pots, soil is the top layer of earth in which plants grow, and mud is wet and sticky earth sometimes used for building a house. Examples: • A clay pigeon is a disk made of clay fired into the air to be shot at for sport. • The soil here is very fertile. • The boy was covered with mud.

56 fool around — behave in a playful, silly, or irresponsible way without thinking seriously about what you are doing Examples: • We spend the afternoon fooling around on the beach. • Don’t fool around with matches.

57 out of shape — unhealthy and unable to do a lot of physical activity without getting tired Useful phrases with “shape”: take shape — become clearer or more definite e.g. After three months of research, my thesis begins to take shape. Useful phrases with “shape”: in good (bad) shape — in good (bad) condition e.g. Not many segments of the Great Wall are in good shape. Useful phrases with “shape”: in the shape of — in the form of e.g. The symbolic building was designed in the shape of a ship.

58 Comprehension Vocabulary Listening Unit 7 • Exercises
So What’s So Bad about Being So-So?

59 Exercises • Comprehension
《读写教程 III》: Ex. II, p. 203

60 Answer the following questions:
Exercises • Comprehension Answer the following questions: 1. How does the author justify her incompetence in piano-playing, singing and drawing? 2. What did hobbies like singing and playing the violin used to represent? How (according to the author) has that attitude changed? She enjoys these hobbies, and is competent enough in other areas. They used to be a mark of class and it was enough to be somewhat familiar with them. Now we’re expected to be experts even in our hobbies.

61 Exercises • Comprehension
3. What is the author’s point in describing “serious types’” attitude toward shoes? 4. According to the author, what effect[s] does the new attitude toward hobbies have on children? What specific example[s] does she give to support her view? She’s illustrating an attitude that dominates leisure sports and intimidates many people into avoiding them. It makes them uncharitable in their thinking; too competitive to enjoy their hobbies; and causes them too much stress. The examples she gives are the boy who didn’t want a less-than-great player on his soccer team, and a girl who has “no free time” because school and her hobbies drive her too hard.

62 Exercises • Comprehension
5. What is the story of the woman who wants to learn a foreign language meant to illustrate? 6. What does she mean by saying “I wonder if some of us aren’t improving ourselves right into the insane asylum” (Para. 9)? That this over-ambitious attitude toward hobbies intimidates many people into avoiding them. She suspects that this degree of ambition and concentration on leisure activities is unhealthy.

63 Exercises • Comprehension
7. How does the author suggest we should “put a stop to all this”? What is the point of her recommendation? 8. What is it that she feels we can learn from two-year-olds? She recommends that we should all take up a leisure activity and make a point of never mastering it. She hopes this might remind us how to relax and enjoy our leisure time. Enthusiasm independent of success; “the joy of creative fooling around”.

64 Vocabulary Ex. III Ex. IV Exercises • Vocabulary
So What’s So Bad about Being So-So?

65 Exercises • Vocabulary
《读写教程 III》: Ex. III, p. 204

66 Exercises • Vocabulary
III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. leisure hobby overhear recreation discourage peculiar sole squeeze wreck stumble 1. My _____________ are watercolour painting and stamp collecting. What are yours? hobbies 2. Lisa has always had a _____________ sense of humour — she finds the strangest things amusing. peculiar

67 Exercises • Vocabulary
III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. leisure hobby overhear recreation discourage peculiar sole squeeze wreck stumble 3. I wonder how she _____________ herself into such tight clothes— and why! She certainly looks uncomfortable! squeezes 4. I thought gadgets like microwaves and computers were meant to give us more _____________ time, but in fact they just seem to add to the pressures of modem life. leisure

68 Exercises • Vocabulary
III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. leisure hobby overhear recreation discourage peculiar sole squeeze wreck stumble 5. He would’ve won the race, but he _____________ and nearly fell just before he reached the finish line. stumbled 6. You shouldn’t get _____________ just because you don’t succeed the first time you try something new. discouraged

69 Exercises • Vocabulary
III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. leisure hobby overhear recreation discourage peculiar sole squeeze wreck stumble 7. Sorry, but I couldn’t help _____________ your conversation. If you’re lost, perhaps I can help you. overhearing 8. Computer games are fine for _____________, but some kids get completely obsessed with them and neglect all their other activities. recreation

70 Exercises • Vocabulary
III. Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. leisure hobby overhear recreation discourage peculiar sole squeeze wreck stumble 9. Families in which the woman is the _____________ wage earner have to cope with many social and financial pressures. sole 10. I had an accident last week and my bicycle got _____________. Could I borrow yours? wrecked

71 Exercises • Vocabulary
《读写教程 III》: Ex. IV, p. 205

72 Exercises • Vocabulary
IV. Rewrite the sentences below so that they use the words given in the parentheses but keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes well. 1. I know you’re afraid, but you really shouldn’t keep delaying your visit to the dentist. (off)  I know you’re afraid, but you really shouldn’t keep putting off your visit to the dentist. 1. I know you’re afraid, but you really shouldn’t keep delaying your visit to the dentist. (off)

73 Exercises • Vocabulary
IV. Rewrite the sentences below so that they use the words given in the parentheses but keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes well. 2. She had a good chance of getting a promotion, but she spoiled it when she insulted one of our best customers. (shot, blow)  She had a good shot at getting a promotion, but she blew it when she insulted one of our best customers. 2. She had a good chance of getting a promotion, but she spoiled it when she insulted one of our best customers. (shot, blow)

74 Exercises • Vocabulary
IV. Rewrite the sentences below so that they use the words given in the parentheses but keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes well. 3. Many teachers complain that the existing exam system prevents real improvements in teaching methods. (the way)  Many teachers complain that the existing exam system gets in the way of real improvements in teaching methods. 3. Many teachers complain that the existing exam system prevents real improvements in teaching methods. (the way)

75 Exercises • Vocabulary
IV. Rewrite the sentences below so that they use the words given in the parentheses but keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes well. 4. No one thought George would ever learn Japanese, but in fact he picked it up quite quickly. (happen, time)  No one thought George would ever learn Japanese, but as it happens he picked it up in no time. 4. No one thought George would ever learn Japanese, but in fact he picked it up quite quickly. (happen. time)

76 Exercises • Vocabulary
IV. Rewrite the sentences below so that they use the words given in the parentheses but keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes well. 5. What a mess your room is! Why don’t you put it in order? (up)  What a mess your room is! Why don’t you tidy it up? 5. What a mess your room is! Why don’t you put it in order? (up)

77 Exercises • Vocabulary
IV. Rewrite the sentences below so that they use the words given in the parentheses but keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes well. 6. If you keep acting in a way that isn’t serious, you’re going to get into trouble. (around)  If you keep fooling around, you’re going to get into trouble. 6. If you keep acting in a way that isn’t serious, you’re going to get into trouble. (around)

78 Exercises • Vocabulary
IV. Rewrite the sentences below so that they use the words given in the parentheses but keep the original meaning. Be sure to make any other necessary changes well. 7. I’ve gotten somewhat physically unfit, so I’ve started going to the gym once a week to see if I can improve my physical condition. (kind, tone)  I’ve gotten kind of out of shape, so I’ve started going to the gym once a week to see if I can tone my self up. 7. I’ve gotten somewhat physically unfit, so I’ve started going to the gym once a week to see if I can improve my physical condition. (kind, tone)

79 Listening Practice 《听说教程 III》 Part 2.2, p.86

80 Listening Practice Conversation While listening, please think about the following questions. What does Sherry ask Liza to do? Why does Liza refused to do as Sherry asks? What is Sherry’s wish? Why does Sherry refuse to accept Liza’s advice? Why does Liza like painting? Check-up

81 Comprehension questions:
Listening Practice Comprehension questions: 1. What does Sherry ask Liza to do?  Sherry asks Liza to come along with her to a movie. 2. Why does Liza refused to do as Sherry asks?  Because she has got a painting class tonight.

82 Listening Practice 3. What is Sherry’s wish?  She always wishes she could paint. 4. Why does Sherry refuse to accept Liza’s advice?  Because she thinks she doesn’t have any talent for artistic stuff. 5. Why does Liza like painting?  For fun. Script

83 Listening Practice Sherry: [panicking] But I don’t even know the right way to hold the brush! Liza: Any way you like. It doesn’t matter. Sherry: [still panicking] But I wouldn’t know where to start! I wouldn’t know what to paint! And everyone else will be better than me! I hate that feeling. Liza: Well, but everyone is a beginner at first. You don’t have to be scared. No one will laugh at you. Sherry: No, I couldn’t. if I can’t do something right, I’d rather not do it at all. I feel better doing the things I’m good at, like … Liza: Like going to the movies. Sherry: [cheering up] Right! Like going to movies. Sherry: A few of us are going to a movie tonight. Do you want to come along? Liza: Oh, I can’t. I’ve got my painting class tonight. Sherry: Painting! I’m impressed. I didn’t know you were a painter. Liza: I’m not. It’s just something I enjoy in my spare time. Sherry: I’ve always wished I could paint. Liza: Well, why don’t you come to the class with me? It’s very informal; new people are joining all the time. It’s fun. Sherry: Oh no, I couldn’t. I don’t have any talent for artistic stuff. Liza: That doesn’t matter; it’s just for fun.

84 1. Review Text A 2. Do exercises: • Structure (Ex. X, p. 209) • Cloze (Ex. XI, p. 209) • Translation (Ex. XII, p. 210) 3. Structured Writing (p. 213) Assignment


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