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Worldview is “the deep-level assumptions, values, and commitments in terms of which people govern their lives.” Charles H. Kraft, Communication Theory.

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Presentation on theme: "Worldview is “the deep-level assumptions, values, and commitments in terms of which people govern their lives.” Charles H. Kraft, Communication Theory."— Presentation transcript:

1 Worldview is “the deep-level assumptions, values, and commitments in terms of which people govern their lives.” Charles H. Kraft, Communication Theory for Christian Witness, Rev. ed. (Maryknoll: Orbis, 1991), 161.

2 “We”-and “I”-cultures

3 Culture“We” “I” Primary Identity clearer group identity interdependent “we” e.g., introducing oneself with one’s company and/or family name first clearer individual identity independent “I” e.g., introducing oneself with one’s first name only Valuesgroup success and group initiatives self-realization, individual success, and individual initiatives

4 Culture“We” “I” Goals group goals over individual goals individual goals over group goals Standardsingroup conforms to group’s standards different standards for ingroup and outgroup universal standards for ingroup and outgroup

5 “We”- and “I”-cultures Implication for Mission

6 High- and Low-context Cultures

7 Culture High-Context (“We”) Low-Context (“I”) Direct or Indirecttend to understate, speak indirectly, communicate ambiguously, and differentiate more between ingroup and outgroups “can be characterized by being direct, explicit, open, precise, being consistent with one’s feelings”; differentiates less between ingroup and outgroup

8 Culture High-Context (“We”) Low-Context (“I”) Verbal or Non- verbal Emphasis communication emphasizes contextual cues: age, dress, posture, status, behavior, eye- contact, and facial expression communication emphasizes words; communication is primary through words

9 本音と建前 [ Honne is] an opinion or an action motivated by one’s true inner feelings and [ tatemae is] an opinion or an action influenced by social norms. These two words are often considered a dichotomy contrasting genuinely-held personal feeling and opinions from those that are socially controlled. Nobuyuki Honna and Bates Hoffer, An English Dictionary of Japanese Culture (Tokyo: Yuhikaku, 1986), 94.

10 本音と建前 Honne is one’s deep motive or intention, while tatemae refers to motives or intentions that are socially tuned, those that are shaped, encouraged, or suppressed by majority norms.... [H]onne and tatemae are not actually opposites as these two values are relative to people and situations. Nobuyuki Honna and Bates Hoffer, An English Dictionary of Japanese Culture (Tokyo: Yuhikaku, 1986), 94.

11 D. Katan,Translating Cultures: An Introduction for Translators, Interpreters, and Mediators (Manchester, St. Jerome Publishing, 1999), in Giovanna Pistillo, “The Interpreter as Cultural Mediator,” Journal of Intercultural Communication, No 6 (2003) (accessed December 21, 2011).

12 High- and Low-context Cultures Implication for Mission

13 Discussion What are you thoughts about the “We” and “I” cultures? High-context and low-context cultures?

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16 Genesis 2:25 (NIV) The man and his wife were both naked, and they felt no shame.

17 Genesis 3:7 (NIV) Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves.

18 Genesis 3:8 (NIV) Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the LORD God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and they hid from the LORD God among the trees of the garden.

19 Genesis 3:9-10 (NIV) But the LORD God called to the man, "Where are you?" He answered, "I heard you in the garden, and I was afraid because I was naked; so I hid."

20 …the term guilt and its various derivatives occur 145 times in the Old Testament and 10 times in the New Testament, whereas the term shame and its derivatives occur nearly 300 times in the Old Testament and 45 times in the New Testament. Timothy C. Tennent, Theology in the Context of World Christianity: How the Global Church is Influencing the Way We Think about and Discuss Theology (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2007), 213.

21 Shame focuses on the person focuses on what happened Guilt

22 Shame “ I did something bad or wrong.” Guilt

23 ShameGuilt “shrinking, feeling small, feeling worthless, powerless” “tension, remorse, regret” Norman Kraus, Jesus Christ Our Lord: Christology from a Disciple's Perspective (Scottdale, PA: Herald Press, 1990

24 Shame “desire to hide, escape, or strike back” “ desire to confess, apologize, or repair” Guilt Norman Kraus, Jesus Christ Our Lord: Christology from a Disciple's Perspective (Scottdale, PA: Herald Press, 1990

25 Shame Concern with others’ evaluation of self Guilt Concern with one’s effect on others

26 Shame Love gets rid of shame. Paying a penalty gets rid of guilt. Guilt

27 Implication for Mission

28 Discussion What are you thoughts about shame and guilt cultures?

29 Five Metaphors For Jesus Saving Effect: “the court of law (e.g., justification), the world of commerce (e.g., redemption), personal relationship (e.g., reconciliation), worship (e.g., sacrifice), and the battleground (e.g., triumph over evil).” Joel Green & Mark Baker, Recovering the Scandal of the Cross ( Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2000), 23.

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31 Notes and Resources


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