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Mainstreaming Recovery: Practitioners, Organisations and Systems. 1.Workforce Transformation – beyond training. 2. Localism, and the key integrations for.

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Presentation on theme: "Mainstreaming Recovery: Practitioners, Organisations and Systems. 1.Workforce Transformation – beyond training. 2. Localism, and the key integrations for."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mainstreaming Recovery: Practitioners, Organisations and Systems. 1.Workforce Transformation – beyond training. 2. Localism, and the key integrations for alcohol and drugs treatment. Ian Wardle, CEO Lifeline 14 th February Skills Consortium

2 Mainstreaming Recovery The successful implementation of personalised, recovery-oriented practice goes: beyond the confines of the current drug treatment system and its disconnected forms of working; beyond retraining the existing workforce and involves serious consideration of: front-line practice; organisational learning and development and system wide commissioning and partnership activity a sustained focus on integrating services for the multiply excluded and earlier intervention for many drink and drug problems

3 Skills Consortium: the workforce transformation matrix Allows us to look in more detail at these: – Practitioner Led elements – Organisational elements – System elements

4 Practitioner Elements: Developing a Recovery Oriented Workforce – Beyond training – Efficacy and evidence-based interventions – Learning embedded into practice Organisational Elements: – Cultural and transformational factors in mainstream recovery – Business and Operational Factors – Structural Factors in Service Delivery System Elements – Efficiency driven top down integration – End of Ring Fence may result in Drug Treatment Shortfalls – Cross-Sector coalitions will augmenting commissioned systems – Financial innovation driving more sophisticated inter-sectoral outcome measures Mainstreaming Recovery

5 Skills Consortium: the workforce transformation matrix a)Practitioner Intervention Level: competencies appropriate to post. Working with drug users –establishing which therapeutic techniques, interpersonal styles or attributes work best with whom and in what situations. b)Worker Level: staff selection, training supervision and support Plus requirements to develop and improve practice based on research and user feedback c)Organisational Level: creating and maintaining ‘learning organisations’ Organisations’ which seek and incorporate knowledge and promote staff development in outcome-promoting directions d)System Level: integration and empowerment driven from above and below Fostering a), b) and c) through commissioning decisions in a local area, The establishment of inter-agency practice sharing and development networks, Contractual requirements to demonstrate evidence-based practice, etc.

6 Organisations commonly fall short of efficacy Relevant studies examined by Thomas D’Aunno “…many treatment programs across the nation use treatment practices that do not meet empirically established standards for effective care. “…a relatively large body of evidence on the effectiveness of particular treatment practices for drug abuse clients.” “…organisations deliver very unevenly in respect of evidenced practice and the skills upon which it is based.”

7 Workforce Development: well beyond the narrow traditional notion of “training ” 1)“The strategies required to develop an adequate workforce response to alcohol and drug problems extend well beyond the narrow traditional notion of “training”. 2)Systemic and sustainable changes within key organisations and agencies are also essential. 3) A major paradigm shift is required to refocus our thinking away from an exclusive orientation on training to one which encapsulates factors such as organisational development, change management, evidence-based knowledge transfer and skill development.” Practitioner Elements: Developing a Recovery Oriented Workforce

8 Organisational Elements: New Cultural and Transformational factors in Mainstream Recovery Focus on Empowerment and the Co design of Recovery Peer-led working in custody and community More Powerful and Personal Service-user Voice New partnerships, greater continuity of care Financial innovation around evidence and outcomes Business and Operational Factors Clearer demarcation of key management and practitioner functions New job roles reflecting recovery orientation Levels of competency and efficacy consistent with evidenced standards Structural Factors in Service Delivery Service models with clear recovery direction Engagement Phase with seamless assessment and co-designed recovery planning Co-ordination as a key function Re-integration and recovery available from initial engagement

9 . New cultural and transformational elements in Mainstream Recovery A new more optimistic anthropology Better systems of recognition, representation and voice Recovery as a personalised, ‘owned’ journey The therapeutic role of peer communities Recovery options founded on meaningful choice, closer partnership and greater continuity. Provider coalitions driven by financial innovation around outcomes and evidence

10 Top Managers ManagersTeam Leaders Front-line workers Performance Management Business Development Strategic Awareness Stakeholder Engagement Equality & Diversity Core Skills Business and Operational Factors: Clearer demarcation of key management and practitioner functions

11 Business and Operational Factors: N e w j o b r o l e s r e f l e c t i n g r e c o v e r y o r i e n t a t i o n Recovery Coordination Team Leader JOB PURPOSE 1)To lead one of four integrated components that comprise Lifeline’s recovery-orientated treatment system. 2)To ensure that the service’s key elements (recovery coordination and psychosocial support, at standard enhanced and targeted levels) are integrated, effective and delivered to a high standard. 3)To work in close collaboration with services, internally and externally, to develop effective pathways, approaches and interventions to support and motivate service users through all stages of their individual recovery journey. 4)To work within a strengths-based, recovery-orientated, change and outcomes focused approach which promotes service users and communities as responsible co-producers of health, well-being and recovery

12 Structural Factors in Service Delivery: Assessment Underpinned by the following principles assessment is: A process, not an event Helps services users begin to reflect, or self-assess, and gain insight into their circumstances Focuses on strengths and weaknesses, risks and resilience. Enables the worker to develop a rapport with the service user Enables us to gather information and data A phased process, with the duration of each phase varying depending on service user needs.

13 Structural Factors in Service Delivery: Assessment focuses on strengths and weaknesses, risks and resilience. Health Improvement Harm reduction interventions to ensure service user safety and infection control Health improvement interventions to address general health needs and develop personal responsibility for change Build Strengths Identify service user strengths, skills and abilities Complete 'strengths mapping' exercise with the service user Support the above work with motivational enhancement interventions Assessment Gather required data (core data set), where possible by self completion by service user Complete risk assessment/risk management plan and start TOP Service user completes recovery capital scale to develop insight into strengths Recovery Planning Based on assessment work to date, identify key treatment needs & recovery capital Develop a recovery plan based on the 4 domains of recovery capital Develop a weekly planner of activities with the service user to structure time

14 Structural Factors in Service Delivery: R e c o v e r y O r i e n t e d A s s e s s m e n t s

15 System Elements: the challenges that come with the end of the ring fence 1.Commissioning may only address non-ring fence public health priorities; 2.Potential Alcohol and Drug Treatment Resource shortfalls across commissioned systems – will occasion uncommissioned innovation including financial and organisational innovation; – will encourage cross-sector provider coalitions seeking fresh forms of investment; – will promote those cross sector partnerships that deliver more and better primary and secondary and secondary outcomes; – will in turn encourage better top-down modeling.

16 Overlap between experiences of homelessness and other social issues

17 The key practice integrations: Drugs and Alcohol 1.Integration and the challenge of multiple exclusions; 2.Reducing offending by a closer integration of our criminal justice work: custody and community; 3.Bridging the transitional gap of young adults and incorporating prevention, brief interventions and treatment in targeted work and recovery pathways 4.Integrating clinical, risk-based approaches with asset based forms of assessment and co-working to produce and inspirational recovery-oriented workforce


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