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Welcome to... “Transition".  Family Driven  Non-Profit 501(c)3 Family Network on Disabilities of Florida, Inc. (FND) is: Family Driven: What makes FND.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to... “Transition".  Family Driven  Non-Profit 501(c)3 Family Network on Disabilities of Florida, Inc. (FND) is: Family Driven: What makes FND."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to... “Transition"

2  Family Driven  Non-Profit 501(c)3 Family Network on Disabilities of Florida, Inc. (FND) is: Family Driven: What makes FND unique is that the majority of our Board of Directors, all of our Management Staff and all of our Program Staff are parents or family members of persons with disabilities. When family members call FND, they not only receive the expertise and knowledge of a professional, but also the compassion and empathy of someone who has walked (and continues to walk) in their shoes. Note: Additional information and handout which accomany this workshop will also be available at the end of this presentation.

3 We DO:  Provide Support  Provide Information  Help Identify Options We do NOT: Act As Attorneys Act as Attorneys: We don’t represent families, and we don’t give legal advice. Support: The value of families getting support by networking with other families is built into everything we do. We often get calls from parents or other family members who just need to talk – and we’re there to listen. Information: Altogether, FND logs over 15,000 calls a year, most of them from parents, family members, or professionals who are looking for information. We have a large database of resources in Florida, and a library filled with disability-related information. Regardless of the question, our staff will go the extra mile to find an answer. Identify Options: Our philosophy at FND is that it is not our role to tell families what to do. It is our role, however, to inform families of what their options are – and encourage them to make their own decisions about what is right for their family.

4 WELCOME The purpose of this presentation is to help participants have a better understanding of the transition process, how to effectively participate, and how to access follow-up supports.

5 IDEA “…to ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living.” A General Provision of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act states: ( “…to ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living”) Today, we will be talking about making transitions from school to community.

6 School To Community Transition Passage from one form, state, style, or place to another. The dictionary defines transition as a passage from one form, state, style, or place to another. Parents of children with disabilities experience many transitions throughout the lives of their children. * Hospital to home * Home to Early Intervention Services and the Family Support Plan * Early Intervention Services to Pre School and the IEP Process * Pre School to Elementary School * Elementary School to Middle School * Middle School to High School * High School to Community and/or Higher Education. Throughout all of the transitions made, there is always paperwork, research, family meetings to discuss hopes and dreams, more paperwork, and more research.

7 Transition means that “something is about to change.” FND doesn’t want anyone to feel like this man! Change is unsettling, but necessary for growth. The more students and parents know about the process, and the more they are involved in the process, the less likely they are to have THIS reaction to change.

8 Transition Services Coordinated set of activities Focused on improving academic and functional achievement Based on needs and preferences Instruction and Related Services The term ‘transition services’ means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child to facilitate movement from school to post-school activities. Post school activities may include: continuing education, vocational education, employment (including supported employment), independent living, or community participation. It is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences, and interests; and includes instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives, and when appropriate, the development of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

9 Transition and the IEP Age 14 (in Florida) Post-School Outcome Statements may include:  Diploma Option  Post–Secondary Education  Employment  Living Arrangements  Other Relevant Preferences At age 14, the IEP team begins the development of The Transition IEP. Up until age 14, Present Level of Academic Achievement has driven the development of the IEP. At age 14, in addition to present level, the post school outcome drives the development of the IEP. The child’s functional levels and interests will be determined by transition assessments, which include student input, parental input, teacher observation, and other relevant data. The analysis of these assessments will be used to develop an individual Post-School Outcome Statement. An example of a post-school outcome statement might be: “Sam will complete requirements for a special diploma, maintain his job in the hospital cafeteria, live in an apartment with a friend, and participate in recreational activities in the community.”

10  a statement of the student’s transition service needs  consideration of instruction or the provision of information in the area of self-determination Transition and the IEP Age 14 (in Florida) Post-School Outcome Statements may include: The IEP team must write a statement that reflects the student’s needs that focuses on the student's courses of study, such as participation in advanced-placement courses or a vocational education program. The team must also consider the student’s need for instruction or information (addressing skills including self-awareness, self-advocacy, making choices, setting goals, solving problems, and taking action) that will assist him or her to be able to actively and effectively participate in IEP meetings and self-advocate, if appropriate.

11 Transition and the IEP Age 14 (in Florida) Student Invited Diploma options If appropriate, the student is invited to participate in the IEP meeting. During the student's eighth grade year or during the school year of the student's fourteenth birthday, whichever comes first, the IEP must include a statement of whether the student is pursuing a course of study leading to a standard diploma or a special diploma. In order to identify diploma options, it is helpful to first understand the Florida Sunshine State Standards.

12 The Sunshine State Standards are a set of statewide academic standards that represent the knowledge and skills Florida students will need to achieve in order to succeed in the world of work or college. Sunshine State Standards The Sunshine State Standards are the guidelines that identify what a child is expected to learn in each grade level, in order to be promoted into the next grade level. They are heavy on academic basics, like reading, writing and mathematics. The standards provide clear, identifiable goals for learning what a child is expected to know in each subject at each grade level. It is strongly recommended that parents familiarize themselves with the Sunshine State Standards when developing goals on the IEP. In order to graduate with a regular diploma a student needs to master the Sunshine State Standards.

13 Diploma Options 2.0 grade point average Passing score on FCAT Complete credits Standard Diploma To earn a Standard Diploma, students must meet the graduation requirements set by the state and any additional requirements set by the local school district. The student must earn an overall 2.0 (C) grade point average (GPA) on a 4.0 (A) scale. The student must earn a passing score on both portions of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). The student must successfully complete credits in the required subject areas for one of the following graduation programs: Traditional 24 credit standard diploma, Three year, 18 credit college preparatory diploma, and Three year, 18 credit career preparatory diploma. At the end of 8th grade, students working toward a standard diploma will be asked to select one of these three programs.

14 Standard Diploma FCAT Waiver IEP Team may waive FCAT Criteria for consideration Mastered Sunshine State Standards FCAT not accurate measure Diploma Options For students with disabilities, the IEP team may waive the FCAT requirement for graduation with a 24 credit standard diploma. To be considered for the waiver, the student must meet certain criteria. If there is sufficient evidence that the student has mastered the Sunshine State Standards and the IEP Team determines that the FCAT is NOT an accurate measure, the FCAT requirement must be waived for the math or reading portion, or both.

15 Special Diploma Option 1 Minimum number of credits Mastery of Sunshine State Standards for Special Diploma Diploma Options Special Diploma Option 1: The student must earn the minimum number of course credits determined by the local school board. The student must show mastery of the Sunshine State Standards for Special Diploma.

16 Special Diploma Option 2 Successfully employed Achieve all annual goals Competencies in employment Diploma Options This Option is based on mastery of a set of employment and community competencies identified in the graduation training plan developed for each individual student by the IEP Team. Requirements for a Special Diploma Option 2 are: The student must be successfully employed for at least one semester, at or above minimum wage. The student must achieve all annual goals related to employment and community competencies identified in the IEP. The student must show mastery of competencies in employment and community.

17 Regular Certificate of Completion Complete course requirements Unable to hold 2.0 Unable to Pass Grade 10 FCAT Regular Certificate of Completion for Students with Disabilities Eligible to receive Special Diploma Option 1 Regular Certificate of Completion may be awarded to a student who completes all standard course requirements, but who is unable to earn an overall 2.0 grade point average, and earn a passing score on the grade 10 FCAT. Regular Certificate of Completion for Students with Disabilities: Students with disabilities who are eligible to receive a regular certificate of completion may choose to receive a Special Diploma, Option 1, instead. Students with disabilities who are eligible to receive a regular certificate of completion may choose to remain enrolled and continue to receive exceptional student education (ESE) services in pursuit of a standard diploma until their 22nd birthday.

18 Certificate of Completion College Placement Test Eligible 2.0 Grade Point Average Unable to pass FCAT Eligible to take College Placement Test Certificate of Completion College Placement Test Eligible may be awarded to a student who completes standard course requirements and earns an overall 2.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale but who is unable to earn a passing score on the grade 10 FCAT. Students who receive a Certificate of Completion— College Placement Test Eligible must be allowed to take the College Placement Test and be admitted to remedial or credit courses at a Florida community college, as appropriate.

19 Special Certificate of Completion Unable to meet requirements for a special diploma A special certificate of completion is available to students with disabilities who are unable to meet all of the requirements for a special diploma. The certificate indicates that the student passed required ESE courses but did not master all of the Sunshine State Standards for a Special Diploma.

20 Transition and the IEP Update Outcome Statement Review Diploma Decisions Develop Goals Update Statement of Transition Needs Develop Statement of Needed Services & Linkages Invite Agencies and Document Participation At age 16, the team must: update desired post-school outcome statement on the Transition IEP. review and if needed revise the diploma decision. develop goals based upon transition assessments which relate to training and education, employment, and independent living skills. update the statement of transition needs that focuses on courses of study. develop a statement of needed transition services that may include instruction, related services, community experiences, employment, post-school adult living and, if appropriate, daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation. when appropriate, develop statement of agency responsibilities or any needed linkages. Invite any agency likely to provide or pay for any transition services to send a representative.

21 Age 16 Student Participation Agency Participation in the Transition IEP Meeting Provision of Services by Agencies Alternative Strategies Transition and the IEP If the student does not attend the Transition IEP meeting, the team should document other steps taken to ensure that the student’s needs, preferences, and interests were considered. If an agency invited to send a representative to the Transition IEP meeting does not do so, the team should document other steps taken to obtain their participation. If an agency fails to provide transition services described in the Transition IEP, the team should reconvene to identify alternative strategies to meet the student’s transition objectives. The district shall identify an IEP team member or designee who will follow-up with agencies, as needed, and verify the provision of services by other agencies to the student and/or the student's parents as provided for in the IEP.

22 Age 17 Transfer of Rights Transition and the IEP In Florida, the age of majority is 18. Just before students turn 17, they must be informed of the rights that will transfer to them when they turn 18. The IEP must include a statement confirming that the student was informed. This notice must be provided to both the individual and the parents. If a child has, through guardianship procedures, been determined to be “incompetent,” then this provision does not apply. Florida’s statutes include a special guardianship for individuals with developmental disabilities called “guardian advocate,” which, while it does not include a “competency” hearing, can state that the person does not have the ability to provide informed consent with respect to their educational program.

23 Age 18 Age Of Majority Transition and the IEP At age 18, the rights transfer to the student. The parents will still receive notice to attend the meeting as a person knowledgeable about the student.

24 Should take part in their own IEP meetings Students themselves should take part in their own IEP meetings, if they are able to do so, especially when the focus is transition planning. The student should be encouraged to actively participate, read the IEP, express needs, preferences, and interests, write down long term goals (What does the student want to do?), learn about civil rights, practice job interviews, and help identify accommodations, supports, and technology to assist him/her in the community.

25 Help prepare Provide insight Provide information Partner Monitor Commit Parents can: help prepare the student by role playing different situations, such as interviews. observe the student’s independent living skills. provide insight on his or her strengths, needs, preferences, and interests and assist in developing the Post- School Outcome Statement. provide information on independent living skills, and medical needs. introduce the student to adult role models with disabilities. identify community participation and social relationships outside of school. For example, there are resources available in the blue pages of the phone book. partner, monitor, and commit to a successful Transition IEP.

26 Help prepare Provide insight Provide information Partner Monitor Commit Did you notice that the list for School District Personnel is the same as the list for Parents? Like parents, school district personnel should help prepare the student through role play, community based instruction and other methods, provide insight regarding the provider network in the area, talk to the student about transition services, and help to identify the student’s outcome statement. School District Personnel should also encourage staff to be creative in the problem solving, partnering, monitoring, and commitments.

27 School Counselors Career Assessment Personnel Vocational Educators Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors Transition Specialists Employment Specialists Independent Living Centers Post Secondary Programs Partners in the Process The completion of high school is the beginning of adult life. Entitlement to public education ends, and young people and their families are faced with many options and decisions about the future. The most common choices for the future are pursuing vocational training or further academic education, getting a job, and living independently. Partners in the process may include: School Counselors, Career Assessment Personnel, Vocational Educators, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Transition Specialists, Probation Officers, Employment Specialists, Job Coaches, Local Businesses, Independent Living Centers, and Post Secondary Programs.

28 Planning for Employment Training and Preparation  Provide instruction  Community based experiences  Identify providers  Supports  On the job training Training and preparation may include: providing instruction to youth on job-seeking skills -16. providing community-based work experiences related to career development -16. identifying potential service providers -16. providing natural supports and accommodations -16. providing instruction and training (pre-employment or on-the-job.)

29 Planning for Employment Assessment  Interview  Observation in a work setting  Vocational evaluation  Self assessment  Develop awareness  Discuss health care issues Assessment may include: a functional transition assessment which includes interviewing in regards to vocational interests and preferences. situational assessment (observation in a work setting) to assess endurance, strength, aptitude, social skills, interests, and interactions. self-assessment to identify things that they believe they can do. develop awareness of different jobs. Discussion of health care issues that may impact employment (part of an assessment).

30 Planning for Employment Development  Contact employment services  Work experiences  Community programs  Community contacts  Employer training Development would include: Analyze local labor market (contact employment services for state and request information for the region; contact local vocational advisory council; contact local chamber of commerce; review local want ads; contact employment agencies) to identify job openings and local labor needs Get a range of work experiences: explorations, job shadowing, mentoring, and internships

31 Planning for Employment Matching  Analyze demands and expectations  Supports student needs  Match assessment to job demands  Identify gaps  Identify natural supports Matching could be provided in a vocational classroom or a vo-tech program: Analyze the demands and expectations of the job site (e.g., duties, skill requirements, hours, location, transportation, wages, benefits, social skills) List the supports the student needs to be successful on the job Match the student's assessment and the list of needed supports to the job demands, including transportation to the job Identify current gaps and needs for success Identify needed natural supports, job accommodations, adaptive equipment, and support services

32 Planning for Employment Placement and Follow Along  Identify strategies  Natural supports  Monitor progress  Changing needs  Make adjustments Job Placement: communicate with employer to determine employee's response to the job demands and identify strategies to capitalize on strengths and minimize limitations providing natural supports and accommodations monitoring progress and readiness for job advancement monitoring changing need for natural supports making adjustments, as needed

33 Thank You! (800) (727) Thank you! Please do not hesitate to call or if we can be of any assistance to you.


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