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10 TH G RADE E NGLISH T UESDAY, 15 A PR. 2014 Agenda: Turn in Outline (if finished for homework) Mini Lesson on Hooks and What to Put in the Introduction.

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Presentation on theme: "10 TH G RADE E NGLISH T UESDAY, 15 A PR. 2014 Agenda: Turn in Outline (if finished for homework) Mini Lesson on Hooks and What to Put in the Introduction."— Presentation transcript:

1 10 TH G RADE E NGLISH T UESDAY, 15 A PR Agenda: Turn in Outline (if finished for homework) Mini Lesson on Hooks and What to Put in the Introduction Paragraph Research Background/Historical Info Craft Introduction Homework: Finish Intro if didn’t have time in class.

2 L EARNING T ARGETS 1. I can craft an original and creative hook that draws readers in. 2. I can anticipate the background information my audience will need in order to fully understand my topic. 3. I can include historical background information or context for my issue that informs the reader with correct details in the introduction. 4. I can craft a working thesis with an arguable point that clearly takes a stand on my issue. 5. If appropriate, I can also provide the solution to the problem as I see it in my thesis.

3 I NTRODUCTION R EQUIREMENTS 1. Hook : make your introductory paragraph interesting. How can you draw your readers in? 2. Define your topic. 3. History/Background Info: what historical or background information do we need to know in order to understand your topic? 4. Explain why your issue is problematic, and how you think that problem should be solved. 5. State your arguable thesis at the end of your introductory paragraph.

4 H OOKS : 5 D IFFERENT I DEAS FOR H OW TO B EGIN Y OUR E SSAY 1. An intriguing example In 1998, 30,708 deaths were caused by firearms in the United States. Of that number, 12,102 were murders, 17,424 were suicides, 366 were accidents, 316 had unknown reasons, and only 154 were confirmed to be in self-defense. 2. A provocative quotation “Guns save more lives than they take and prevent more injuries than they inflict” (34) says the Gun Owners Foundation. 3. A puzzling scenario While mother talks on the phone, three year old Timmy walks into his parents’ room and reaches underneath the bed. To his delightful surprise, Daddy’s gun is within reach and he pulls the riffle out. Hoping to use Daddy’s toy in a game of cops and robbers, Timmy heads for the family room in a fit of excitement. Twenty minutes later, his brother and sister are dead. 4. A vivid and perhaps unexpected anecdote Learning about gun control in the American history course at Camas High School, students studied the history of guns, the statistics of guns and violence, and the laws that govern people’s use of guns. Students did not discuss the efficacy of guns, however, until one student, Mary, raised her hand and asked, 'But why would a country outlaw guns?' That modern high school students could not conceive of an American life devoid of gun ownership speaks volumes about the centrality of guns to American people today.) 5. A thought-provoking question For every time a gun is used in self defense, twenty-two shootings are not (Gunderson 23). Why, then, are guns legal in the United States?

5 I NTRODUCTION G RADING S CALE Level 4:  Exceptional hook that clearly and cleverly draws the reader in  Powerful definition of topic created through vivid word choice and content  Exceptional history of topic and development of necessary background information  Powerful personal voice explains why the issue is problematic, and how that problem should be solved  Clearly stated arguable thesis with a clear position on the topic and what should or should not be done about the topic  Intro goes beyond what was taught. Level 3:  Appropriate hook that draws the reader in  Suitable definition of topic created through appropriate word choice and content  Adequate history of topic and development of necessary background information  Clearly stated arguable thesis with a clear position on the topic and what should or should not be done about the topic  Intro reflects what was taught. Level 2:  Developing hook that includes an opening statement but does not draw the reader in to the topic  Plain and brief definition of the topic  History and/or background information is mentioned but is too concise and ideas are not fully developed  Includes an implied thesis but does not clearly state a potion on the topic or what should or should not be done about it  Intro is developing towards what was taught. Level 1:  Offers an opening statement but does not include a clear hook or hook is off-topic  Topic is not clearly and deliberately defined  History/background information is too brief and ideas ramble  Missing a clear thesis  Intro does not reflect what was taught.


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