Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Bullying. What is Bullying? Peer bullying is the repetitive and persistent pattern of behaviors directed by one or more children toward another child.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Bullying. What is Bullying? Peer bullying is the repetitive and persistent pattern of behaviors directed by one or more children toward another child."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bullying

2 What is Bullying? Peer bullying is the repetitive and persistent pattern of behaviors directed by one or more children toward another child. These actions are intended to deliberately inflict physical, verbal, or emotional abuse. (Hendershot, 2006).

3 Types of Bullying Verbal threats Verbal insults Use of nicknames Physical threats – assault or theft Social acts of exclusion from peer group Cyber-bullying – through electronic means such as or cell phones

4 Where Does Bullying Occur? Bullying is more likely to occur in less structured settings such as recess, lunch, athletic competitions, or on the school bus.

5 Prevalence of Bullying 1 of 4 children are bullied 77% of students are bullied mentally, verbally, and physically 1 of 5 kids admit to being a bully 8% of students miss 1 day of class per month for fear of bullies 43% fear harassment in the school bathroom Every 7 minutes a child is bullied on the playground

6 When does bullying begin? Bullying generally begins in the elementary grades, peaks in the sixth through eight grades, and persists into high school. Bullying is more prevalent among males than females and is more frequent among middle school-aged youth than high school-aged youth.

7 Males vs. Females Males – generally engage in physical and verbal bullying Females – generally engage in relational bullying such as ostracism, prejudice, and spreading rumors

8 Potential Victims of Bullying Children with diabetes Children who are less physically attractive Children who are overweight Children who are disabled Children who perform poorly in school Children with learning disabilities or ADHD Children who are passive Children with personality, behavioral, and social differences Children who are gay or lesbian

9 Potential Bullies Children who have a history of being bullied by other children. Children with a history of childhood physical, sexual, or verbal abuse. Children who have learning disabilities Children who have ADHD

10 Consequences of Bullying Problem behaviors, such as smoking and drinking alcohol. Social isolation Poor academic performance A bullied child may imitate the bullying behavior and become aggressive. More than twice as likely to commit homicide.

11 History Does the child feel safe at school? Does the child feel safe on the playground, or in the bathroom? Does the child have frequent absenteeism? Does the child exhibit depression, loneliness, low self esteem, aggression, social isolation, poor academics? Does the child exhibit a loss of appetite or have nightmares? Does the child exhibit school phobia?

12 Current Trends in Management Referral to school nurse, school counselor, principal, social worker and/or school police. Mediation between bully and the bullied child, and their parents, if necessary.

13 Current Trends in Management Training for educators and school nurses to readily identify those who bully and those who are at risk for being bullied. Peer mediation training for students

14 Current Trends in Management Protection and counseling for child who has been bullied. Counseling for the bully. School-wide bullying prevention programs with a multidisciplinary approach. Social skills training, conflict management training, role playing to empower children. Creation of safe environment at school with adequate adult supervision.

15 Current Trends in Management Peer support groups. Consistent disciplinary responses and enforcement of codes of behavior. Role models and mentors for students.

16 Resources for Parents, Teachers, and School Nurses

17 Resources National Association of School Nurses – position statements and issue briefswww.nasn.org

18 References Davis, C. (2006). School’s out for bullying. Nursing standard, 20 (21). P Hendershot, C., Dake, J., Price, J., & Lartey, G. (2006). Elementary school nurses’ perceptions of student bullying. The journal of school nursing, 22(4). p

19

20 HAPPY BIRTHDAY AMY


Download ppt "Bullying. What is Bullying? Peer bullying is the repetitive and persistent pattern of behaviors directed by one or more children toward another child."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google