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Hazard Communication 29 CFR 1910.1200 What OSHA Wants You To Know.

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Presentation on theme: "Hazard Communication 29 CFR 1910.1200 What OSHA Wants You To Know."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hazard Communication 29 CFR 1910.1200 What OSHA Wants You To Know

2 What are MSDS? Where are your MSDS? Right To Know / MSDS

3 Hazard Communication Standard Agenda: –Chemical Hazards –Written Hazard Communication Program –Employee protective measures Container Labeling Requirements Material Safety Data Sheets MSDS inventory –General Spill Clean-Up –Personal Protective Equipment –Contractor Requirements

4 Close Encounters with Chemicals Many chemicals can cause injury or illness if not handled properly. We encounter chemicals almost every day –Filling your vehicle with gasoline –Cleaning the bathroom –Applying pesticides or insecticides –Using solvents or acids at work

5 Chemical Inventory Listing Maintain a current list of ALL chemicals or products on site, including specific uses. Make the list available to all employees. Make the list available during each work shift.

6 Hazards of Chemicals Physical Hazards: –Flammable – below 100° F –Combustible – 100 – 200 F –Explosive – a chemical that causes a sudden, almost instantaneous release of pressure, gas, and heat when subjected to sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature. –Reactive - reactionary materials can cause damage to the human body by release of gases that will burn, explode, or produce high pressure that can inflict injury to a person nearby Health Hazards: –Sensitizer - produces hyperallergic condition –Irritant - reversible inflammatory reaction –Corrosive - irreversible tissue injury –Toxic – poisonous

7 Hazards of Chemicals Health hazard means that acute or chronic health effects may occur in exposed employees - including chemicals which are carcinogens, toxic or highly toxic agents, reproductive toxins, irritants, corrosives, sensitizers, hepatotoxins, nephrotoxins, neurotoxins, agents which act on the hematopoietic system, and agents which damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes.

8 Written Hazard Communication Program Employers shall develop, implement, and maintain at each workplace, a written hazard communication program which at least describes how the criteria specified for labels and other forms of warning, material safety data sheets, and employee information and training will be met, and which also includes the following: –A list of the hazardous chemicals known to be present –The methods the employer will use to inform employees of the hazards of chemicals in their work areas.

9 Written Hazard Communication Program Also includes methods the employer will use to inform other employers (contractors) of chemical hazards, precautionary measures, and the labeling system used The employer shall make the written hazard communication program available, upon request, to employees, or their designated representatives

10 Employee Protective Measures Container Labeling –Who is responsible for labeling secondary containers?

11 Label Requirements (continued) Label all chemical containers that are not going to be used immediately. DO NOT USE containers that resemble beverage containers. Have a adequate labeling supply

12 Manufacturer’s Labeling Primary Containers –Identity of the hazardous chemical(s) –Appropriate hazard warnings Poison Danger Warning Caution First Aid Statement –Name and address of manufacturer or responsible party

13 Secondary Labeling Requirements Same information as Primary Labels –Identity of the hazardous chemical(s) –Appropriate hazard warnings Poison Danger Warning Caution First Aid Statement –Name and address of manufacturer or responsible party

14 Secondary Labeling Requirements Secondary labels may be hand written if: –They are legible and the ink doesn’t smear or run –They contain the required information Identity of the hazardous chemical(s) Appropriate hazard warnings –Poison –Danger –Warning –Caution –First Aid Statement Name and address of manufacturer or responsible party

15 Secondary Labeling Requirements “… not required to label portable containers into which hazardous chemicals are transferred from labeled containers, and which are intended only for the immediate use of the employee who performs the transfer.” 1910.1200(f)(7) –Handing container to another person – label required –Breaks & Lunch – out of your direct control – label required –Mop Buckets – unattended – label required

16 Hazard Rating System Two numbering systems –NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) –HMIS (Hazardous Material Identification System) National Paint and Coatings Association

17 Product Safety Hazard labeling –Caution/warning/danger/poison National Fire Protection Association system –Red = fire hazard –Blue = health hazard –Yellow= reactivity –White= specific hazard –0 through 4 HMIS (Hazardous Material Identification System) –Red = fire hazard –Blue = health hazard –Yellow= reactivity –White= specific hazard & PPE Requirements –0 through 4

18 Five Hazards Levels HMIS: –4 Severe –3 Serious –2 Moderate –1 Slight –0 Minimal NFPA: –4 Extreme –3 High –2 Moderate –1 Slight –0 Insignificant

19 NFPA Diamond

20 HMIS

21 MSDS Each material safety data sheet shall be in English (although the employer may maintain copies in other languages as well), and shall contain at least the following information:

22 Material Safety Data Sheets SECTION CONTENTS IProduct Identity IIIngredients Identity Information IIIPhysical/Chemical Characteristics IVFire/Explosion Data VPhysical Hazard Data VIHealth Hazards Data VIIPrecautions for Safe Handling and Use VIIIControl Measures – PPE IXAdditional Information

23 Section I – Product Identity Product Name Manufacturer’s Information –Name –Address –Phone Number – business hours –24-hour Emergency Phone Number National Chemical Emergency hotline

24 Section II - Ingredients/ Identity Information Name(s) of Hazardous Chemicals –Top 5 by weight CAS# (Chemical Abstract Service Registry Number) OSHA PEL – Permissible Exposure Limit ACGIH – Time Weighted Averages for concentrate. STEL – Is the exposure concentration that is not to be exceed for a Short Term Exposure (15 Minutes)

25 Section III - Physical / Chemical Characteristics Why? –Physical and chemical changes can affect the type and degree of hazard Boiling Point – Temperature a liquid becomes a gas. Vapor Pressure –Pressure exerted on the container between the liquid level and the cap. Vapor Density – Is the vapor heavier or lighter than air Solubility In Water – How well does the product mix with water

26 Section III - Physical / Chemical Characteristics Specific Gravity – Is the product heavier or lighter than water Percent Volatile By Volume – How much of the product will evaporate? Evaporation Rate – How fast does it evaporate? Appearance and Odor – Changes can indicate product is not what you thought was in the container.

27 Section IV - Fire and Explosion Hazard Data Flash Point – The minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off a vapor in sufficient concentration to ignite. Flammable Limits = LEL (Lower Explosive Limit) and UEL (Upper Explosive Limit) Firefighting Information – What Material to use (water, foam, etc.) to put out a fire involving this chemical; special precautions, etc.

28 Section V - Physical Hazards Stability – How well the chemical resists change. Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid) – Mixing two chemical may form a toxic or explosive mixture. Hazardous Decomposition Products or Byproducts – When a product breaks down by heat, chemical reaction, decay etc. to form an new hazardous chemical

29 Section VI - Health Hazard Data Definition – A chemical substance that is either an –Acute (immediate) health hazard = Usually minutes, hours or several days. or –Chronic (delayed) health hazard = Regular exposure over months, years, or a lifetime

30 Section VI - Health Hazard Data Routes of Entry –Ingestion: Entry may occur by eating, drinking or smoking without washing hands first –Absorption: Entry my occur through contact with skin, eyes, nose, mouth, etc. –Inhalation: Entry may occur through the inhalation of chemical vapors – not the fragrance in a product

31 Section VI - Health Hazard Data Carcinogen or Potential Carcinogen must be listed if greater than 0.1% by weight. Signs and Symptoms of Exposure – How to recognize exposure (taste, irritations, headache, nausea, etc.) Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated By Exposure – Conditions that could be made worse by exposure Emergency and First-Aid Procedures – What to do in case of exposure.

32 Section VII – Precautions for Safe Handling and Use Steps to be taken in case material is released or spilled Precautions to be taken in handling and storage

33 Section VIII – Control Measures How to keep yourself safe –Respiratory Protection (Specify Type) –Ventilation –Local Exhaust –Protective Gloves –Eye Protection –Other Protective Clothing or Equipment –Work / Hygienic Practices

34 Section IX – Additional Information Transportation Information for example –Signage requirements, etc.

35 MSDS Inventory The first page in the MSDS book should be a list of the MSDS that should be in the book –Consistently in the top 5 violations issued by OSHA

36 General Precautions For Spill Clean-Up Wear appropriate protective equipment –Read MSDS Follow Ventilation Requirements –Read MSDS Clean up small spills to prevent them from being mistaken for water –Read MSDS For large spills, contact supervisor Store acidic products away from alkaline products to prevent reactions in case of leaks or spills – Read MSDS When diluting, always add acids to water, never water to acids –Read MSDS

37 Personal Protective Equipment The objective for wearing personal protective equipment is to prevent dangerous chemical contact with your person or street clothes –Dust masks and respirators –Glasses, goggles, and face shields –Gloves –Foot protection (Rubber boots) –Aprons or full-body suits 99% of the chemicals involved in housekeeping, especially once diluted, pose minimal risks as long as precautions are followed –Read MSDS

38 Contractor Safety Requirements Outside Contractors must: –Inform representatives about chemicals –Provide MSDS’s upon request Facility or employer representatives must: –Inform the contractor about chemicals –Provide MSDS’s upon request

39 Employee Information and Training Employers shall provide employees with effective information and training on hazardous chemicals in their work area –At the time of their initial assignment, –Whenever a new physical or health hazard is introduced into their work area. May cover categories of hazards –Flammability, carcinogenicity, etc. Specific chemicals –Chemical-specific information must always be available through labels and material safety data sheets.

40 Employee Training Employee training shall include at least: –Methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical in the work area such as monitoring conducted by the employer continuous monitoring devices visual appearance or odor of hazardous chemicals when being released, etc. –The physical and health hazards of the chemicals in the work area

41 Employee Training Employee training shall include at least: –The measures employees can take to protect themselves from these hazards including specific procedures the employer has implemented to protect employees from exposure to hazardous chemicals –appropriate work practices –emergency procedures –personal protective equipment to be used

42 Employee Training Employee training shall include at least: –The details of the hazard communication program developed by the employer, including an explanation of the labeling system the material safety data sheet how employees can obtain and use the appropriate hazard information

43 Hazard Communication Summary Identify chemical hazards –Read labels and MSDS Follow warnings and instructions, or ask your supervisor if in doubt –Read labels and MSDS Use the appropriate PPE –Read labels and MSDS Practice sensible, safe work habits –Read labels and MSDS Learn emergency procedures –Read labels and MSDS

44 Hazard Communication Are there any Questions?

45 Quiz 1.The Hazard Communication Standard Addresses: 1.Communicating information concerning and appropriate to employees. 2.Maintaining a Hazard Communication Program for the workplace 2.(T/F) The Employer must provide MSDS in a language understood by the employee.

46 Quiz 3.Employee training shall include at least: –(T/F) Appropriate work practices –(T/F) Emergency phone numbers –(T/F) Personal protective equipment to be used 4.MSDS – It is the ’s responsibility to provide them; it is the __________’s responsibility to maintain them; and it is the ’s responsibility to read them.

47 Quiz 5.Routes of entry include,, and. 6.(T/F) Changes in a product’s color is not really important. 7.(T/F) Training should occur when a contractor is going to be doing work on-site with a paint remover. 8.Secondary labels must contain the manufacturer’s name and address, the name, and the warning.

48 Quiz 12.(T/F) Secondary labels are always required. 13.(T/F) MSDS must be kept at every worksite. 14.(T/F) Mop buckets need secondary labels under certain circumstances. 15.Employee training shall occur at the time of their or whenever a is introduced

49 Answers 1.The Hazard Communication Standard Addresses: 1.Communicating information concerning hazards and appropriate protective measures to employees. 2.Maintaining a written Hazard Communication Program for the workplace 2.(F) The Employer must provide MSDS in a language understood by the employee.

50 Answers 3.Employee training shall include at least: 4.(T) Appropriate work practices 5.(F) Emergency phone numbers 6.(T) Personal protective equipment to be used 4.MSDS – It is the manufacturer’s responsibility to provide them; it is the employer’s responsibility to maintain them; and it is the employee’s responsibility to read them.

51 Answers 8.Routes of entry include inhalation, skin or eye contact, and ingestion. 9.(F) Changes in a product’s color is not really important. 10.(T) Training should occur when a contractor is going to be doing work on-site with a paint remover. 11.Secondary labels must contain the manufacturer’s name and address, the chemical or product name, and the hazard warning.

52 Answers 12.(F) Secondary labels are always required. 13.(T) MSDS must be kept at every worksite. 14.(T) Mop buckets need secondary labels under certain circumstances. 15.Employee training shall occur at the time of their initial assignment or whenever a new hazard is introduced

53 Hazard Communications Thank You For Your Participation


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