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POLICY Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense & Americas’ Security Affairs Mr. Robert Salesses Office of the Assistant Secretary.

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Presentation on theme: "POLICY Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense & Americas’ Security Affairs Mr. Robert Salesses Office of the Assistant Secretary."— Presentation transcript:

1 POLICY Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense & Americas’ Security Affairs Mr. Robert Salesses Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas’ Security Affairs 9 th Annual Conference on Technologies for Critical Incident Preparedness

2 POLICY Objectives for Presentation  Better understanding DoD roles and responsibilities “The United States derives much of its strength from its advantage in the realm of science and technology (S&T), and we must continue to use this advantage and encourage innovative research and development to assist in protecting and defending against the range of natural and man-made threats confronting the Homeland.” – National Strategy for Homeland Security, (October 2007)  Challenges of National Security Environment  Enable partnerships through shared capabilities and expertise

3 POLICY National Security Environment Threats to U.S. interests at home and abroad are more diverse, leading to increasing attacks worldwide Madrid Train Bombing March ‘04 London Bombing July ‘05 Scotland Car Bombing June ‘07 Foiled Fort Dix Plots October ‘07 Foiled attacks in Germany, Sept ‘07 Foiled JFK plot, June 2007

4 POLICY National Security Environment- Security Assessment  Transnational threats will be the most pressing  Terrorists will seek to  Attack Americans at home and abroad  Inflict mass casualties or cause mass panic through CBRN means (e.g., CBRN weapons or conversion of civilian infrastructure or transport into WMD)  Natural Hazards  Earthquake  Flood, Tsunami  Wildfire  Health and Disease  Nation-state threats will continue  “Traditional” ballistic and cruise missile threats  Rogue states employing asymmetric means  Potential emergence of a regional peer competitor

5 POLICY Lead: Defend the United States from direct attack –At the direction of the President or the Secretary of Defense –Combat Air Patrols, Maritime Intercepts, Missile Defense Enable: Improve partner capabilities –“Internationalize” homeland defense through security cooperation –Increase capabilities of Federal, State and local first responders to improve homeland security Support: Provide defense support of civil authorities –At the direction of the President or the Secretary of Defense –Natural Disasters and CBRNE Consequence Management DoD’s Roles and Responsibilities

6 POLICY 1401 Technology Transfer Program Enhance the capabilities of Federal, State and local first responders. PUBLIC LAW (FY03 National Defense Authorization Act) Section 1401: The Secretary of Defense “shall designate a senior official of the Department of Defense to coordinate all Department of Defense efforts to identify, evaluate, deploy, and transfer to Federal, State, and local first responders technology, items, and equipment in support of homeland security.” Make available DoD technology, items, and equipment that are compatible and interoperable with those of Federal, State and local first responders. Create opportunities to collaborate on research, development, testing, and evaluation of high priority technology, items, and equipment Facilitate awareness of DoD activities in support of public safety and homeland security.

7 POLICY Meeting First Responder Needs Federal Department of Justice Department of Homeland Security Technical Support Working Group Interagency Board (IAB) State/Local International Association of Chiefs of Police International Association of Fire Chiefs National Sheriff’s Association International Association of Emergency Managers National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians State Coordinators for Federal Transfer Programs Municipal Emergency Manager

8 POLICY Sharing Capabilities and Competencies 1401 Technology Transfer  Current Capabilities  Surplus equipment can be acquired by first responders  DoD uses equipment loan programs to allow first responders to “test drive” robots and other equipment prior to making purchase decisions  Near-Term/Future Capabilities  Building the world’s dominant military force requires a very significant investment in R&D and in the infrastructure & people to carry it out  DoD invests in many areas that benefit first responders  Sharing Expertise and Competencies  DoD provides operational and technical expertise in support of DHS-led programs that assist first responders  Communications systems, CBRN equipment, Bomb Squads

9 POLICY Current Capabilities 1401 Technology Transfer  Excess DoD Property Law Enforcement and Fire Services Available at no cost to requesting agency Examples: Vehicles, helicopters, computers, night vision devices, watercraft Tens of millions of dollars yearly in purchase savings and no cost equipment transfers  Use of DoD and GSA Purchase Contracts Law Enforcement and Fire Services Available for counter-drug equipment and supplies Examples: Vehicles, repair parts, personal protective clothing

10 POLICY Current Capabilities 1401 Technology Transfer … Now used as a Police Vehicle in Charlotte, NC

11 POLICY Current Capabilities 1401 Technology Transfer …Now used in Columbus, GA

12 POLICY Current Capabilities 1401 Technology Transfer … Now used by Cornerville, AR Fire Department

13 POLICY Near-Term/Future Capabilities 1401 Technology Transfer  Cooperative R&D also benefits first responders Command and control / emergency management Interoperable communications CBRNE Detection Medical Personnel location and tracking Surveillance Technologies Identity Management

14 POLICY Near-Term/Future Capabilities 1401 Technology Transfer Items originally developed for military use and currently available to first responders and the general public

15 POLICY Shared Expertise and Competencies 1401 Technology Transfer Interoperable Communications Technical Assistance Program (ICTAP) –Assess communications infrastructure gaps and translate operational requirements into technical requirements that can be used to design an interoperable communications system. Commercial Equipment Direct Assistance Program (CEDAP) –Provide technology, equipment, training and technical assistance to selected small and rural jurisdictions. Domestic Preparedness Equipment Technical Assistance Program (DPETAP) –Army teams that provide on site technical assistance to assist first responders in better selecting, operating, and maintaining their CBRN equipment. Homeland Defense Equipment Reuse Program (HDER) –Navy provides surplus radiological detection instrumentation, training, and long term technical support to emergency responder agencies

16 POLICY 1401 Interdepartmental Cooperation

17 POLICY 1401 Technology Transfer

18 POLICY Homeland Defense and Defense Support to Civil Authorities

19 POLICY Questions?

20 POLICY Who DoD is Working to Support Police and Sherriff's Patrol Officers: 624,380* Firefighters: 283,630 Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics: 196,190 *Data compiled from U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, May ‘06

21 POLICY Major Attempts and Successful Acts of Transnational Terror Radicalized Iranian students storm US Embassy and take US hostages Terrorists bomb the US Embassy and Marine Barracks in Beirut, Lebanon st terrorist bombing attempt against the World Trade Center Bojinka (“Big Bang”)- Airliner Bomb Plot Hezbollah car bombing of Khobar Towers, Saudi Arabia Al Qaeda US Embassy bombings in Tanzania and Kenya USS Cole attack in the Port of Aden Millennium Bomb Plot Al Qaeda attacks on Washington, DC & New York City Richard Reid/Shoe Bomb Plot Bali Attack Terrorist attack on British Consulate in Turkey Madrid Train Bomb Attack London Underground Bomb Attack Trans-Atlantic Airliner Bomb Plot The terrorist enemy now considers the US homeland a preeminent part of the global theater of combat, and so must we. The terrorist enemy now considers the US homeland a preeminent part of the global theater of combat, and so must we.

22 POLICY Roles and Definitions Homeland security is a concerted National effort to prevent terrorist attacks within the United States, reduce the vulnerability of the US to terrorism, and minimize the damage & assist in the recovery from terrorist attacks. National Strategy for Homeland Security The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for the homeland security of the United States. DHS also has responsibilities beyond the prevention of terrorism, including leading the US Government response to mitigation and recovery of natural disasters, WMD attacks, and other emergencies. Other federal agencies, such as the FBI, also have critical roles in combating terrorism (e.g., FBI is responsible for terrorist crisis management in the U.S.)

23 POLICY Roles and Definitions Homeland defense is the protection of US sovereignty, territory, domestic population, & critical defense infrastructure against external threats and aggression or other threats as directed by the President. DoD roles within the United States: –Homeland Defense (HD) DoD exercises its core warfighting mission – to defend U.S. territory and interests Missions include: Maritime Interception Operations, Air Patrols over U.S. airspace, Land-based defense of critical infrastructure and assets, and Use of military forces, when directed by the President or Secretary of Defense, to protect the U.S. and territories from attack Threats can be from states or non-state actors –Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA) Typical DoD DSCA missions include support to law enforcement, support to the U.S. Coast Guard, wildland firefighting, etc.


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