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Cross Training to Reduce a NonPrint Backlog Micheline Brown Margaret Fain Kimbel Library, Coastal Carolina University OLAC/MOUG 2000 Conference October.

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Presentation on theme: "Cross Training to Reduce a NonPrint Backlog Micheline Brown Margaret Fain Kimbel Library, Coastal Carolina University OLAC/MOUG 2000 Conference October."— Presentation transcript:

1 Cross Training to Reduce a NonPrint Backlog Micheline Brown Margaret Fain Kimbel Library, Coastal Carolina University OLAC/MOUG 2000 Conference October 14, 2000

2 Coastal Carolina University Until 1993, Coastal Carolina College (CCC) was a branch of the University of South Carolina (USC). While under the USC system, the university’s System Library Services (SLS) performed most of the technical services functions, including acquisitions and cataloging (both of new materials and uncataloged materials within the libraries). Because of the volume of materials to be cataloged by SLS for all of the university system libraries (9 campuses) and their lack of interest in cataloging nonprint materials, cataloging CCC’s nonprint materials was a very low priority for SLS. On July 1, 1993, Coastal Carolina College separated from the USC system and became Coastal Carolina University (CCU). For the next 2 years, CCU contracted with SLS to continue performing the acquisitions and cataloging of its materials. During the USC/SLS time period, in order to provide access to its media materials, Coastal’s Media LTA compiled listings of the materials in notebooks organized by their locations (backlog, video collection, picture file, etc.). These uncataloged materials were assigned accession numbers. The notebooks were helpful, but were limited in providing access since the materials were not in either the card catalog or the online catalog, thus there was no subject access to the materials or wider awareness of their availability. Access to the media materials was dependent primarily on the knowledge of the media collection by the Media LTA and the Media Student Assistants. At the same time CCU became independent from USC, CCU began investigating the purchase of a new online integrated library system. In 1996, when Kimbel Library (CCU) assumed all technical services functions, the new library system (Innopac by Innovative Interfaces Inc. – III) was implemented. Therefore, not only was the Technical Services Department staff learning how to copy catalog for the first time, but they were also learning how to use computers. Therefore, media materials continued to be a low cataloging priority. Our media collection was a heavily circulated part of the library’s collection despite the fact that the majority of the materials were not accessible except through the title listings in the notebooks and the knowledge of the Media Collection staff. It was apparent that cataloging of this collection was becoming more and more imperative.

3 The Situation at Coastal Carolina University Until 1993, Coastal Carolina College (CCC) was one of 9 branch campuses of the University of South Carolina (USC) system. USC’s Systems Library Service (SLS) performed most of CCC’s technical services functions, including acquisitions and cataloging. SLS allows no copy or original cataloging to be done at the branches. Only minimal local location changes are allowed for records in the NOTIS system. Cataloging media materials was a low priority for SLS and stayed that way. CCC stops asking for cataloging for nonprint materials. During the USC/SLS time period, in order to provide access to its newly purchased media materials, Coastal’s Media LTA compiled listings of the materials in notebooks organized by their locations (backlog, video collection, picture file, etc.). On July 1, 1993, Coastal Carolina College separated from the USC system and became Coastal Carolina University (CCU). In 2000, student enrollment is 4,500. For the next 2 years, CCU contracted with SLS to continue performing the acquisitions and cataloging of its materials and continues to use USC’s NOTIS catalog. July 1995, OPAC and Circulation modules of III are implemented. Cataloging and Acquisitions are not implemented till July Technical Services Department staff learn how to use computers and how to copy catalog at the same time. Media materials are heavily used despite their non-appearance in the OPAC. Cataloging media becomes one of many priorities in a department that is newly establishing itself.

4 Timeline/Decision Making Process USC-Coastal Carolina College is part of the 9 campus University of South Carolina system Learning Resource Center is transferred from the Education Department to Kimbel Library and is re-named the Media Collection. Collection includes K-12 curriculum resources and audiovisual materials that support the college curriculum All cataloging and acquisitions for Kimbel Library are performed by USC’s System Library Services (SLS) in Columbia, SC. In-house procedures are created for providing access to media materials, which are not cataloged by SLS. 1995Head of Technical Services and Assistant Head of Public Services hold preliminary discussions about the possibility of actually cataloging all nonprint materials when the new library system is chosen and implemented. Kimbel Library begins search for new online system to replace USC’s Notis product. 1996III OPAC and Circulation modules are implemented. KL joins Solinet and begins training all technical services staff to use OCLC. Assistant Head of Public Services mentions future media cataloging at every appropriate opportunity III Cataloging and Acquisitions modules are implemented. Staff begin cataloging with OCLC. July 1997 Head of Technical Services, Assistant Head of Public Services, Media LTA, and Technical Services Librarian meet for preliminary discussion of media cataloging issues. All newly acquired media materials will be cataloged without exception. Future plans call for summer projects to catalog specific sections of Media Collection.

5 Oct. 1997Decision made to retain ANSCR for compact discs and LP’s. Discussed textbook classification scheme and options for local classification schemes for maps, posters, and pictures. Dec Same group meets to update July discussion in light of Technical Service Department’s training efforts and newly established workload. Assistant Head of Public Services and Media LTA will be taught basic copy cataloging so that 200 new compact discs can be added to collection before Spring semester. Technical Services Department requests a formal list of media cataloging priorities. 1998Public Services and Technical Services are reorganized due to staff losses and workflow management with III. April 1998Group meets to review priorities list in light of other cataloging projects. New guidelines are developed for cataloging videos, puppets, compact discs, big books, duplicating masters, “LC” collection, backlog from cabinets and new backlog. June 1998 First summer project is implemented. Additional training is given. Entire compact disc collection is cataloged. Entire Media Collection, including backlog, is evaluated and weeded in preparation for cataloging.

6 Oct Group meets and clarifies procedures for on-the-fly records, processing new videos, handling circulating periodicals in Media, consolidations of media locations and overall status of cataloging efforts to date. Technical Services halts all media cataloging to concentrate on cleaning up Serials records that were poorly converted from NOTIS to III. March 1999 Group meets and finalizes procedures for cataloging posters and pictures using brief records in III and develops cataloging guidelines for math manipulatives and in-house created teaching kits. Assistant Head of Public Services and Media LTA catalog math and teaching kits May 1999 Ongoing questions from Technical Services Department about location codes, Icodes, etc. in brief records for backlog items prompts the Head of Technical Services to show the Assistant Head of Public Services basic media cataloging using OCLC item backlog is cataloged: some items have been in library for over ten years before they were cataloged. Fall 1999 Based on success of summer backlog project, the decision is made to inventory the Media Collection and the Assistant Head of Public Services will catalog all items not in III. This will be the first inventory done on any part of the library’s collection since III was implemented. Inventory is completed, all items in “LC” collection are cataloged. May 2000 Ongoing cleanup of III database prompts decision to catalog all videos with brief records. 500 videos are cataloged. Fall 2000 Head of Technical Services and Assistant Head of Public Services meet regarding database cleanup issues. Icode cleanup continues.

7 Observations Planning This was the key. We began talking early and continued to meet as new issues emerged. Once we had a plan, we knew what needed to be accomplished and could select projects that fit into the amount of time available or logically followed from database clean-up efforts. Database clean-up projects ended up being the justification for starting most of the cataloging projects.To clean up many of the database problems, we had to catalog the media materials properly. Preparedness By having weeded and evaluated the collection early, we could begin projects without delay. FlexibilityWe were able to start projects with little or no lead time because plans were already in place and preliminary work had been done. Breaking it down into small projects made it more manageable and made our progress easier to measure. Success Completion of initial projects led to greater autonomy and a willingness to undertake additional projects. Commitment Everyone had a stake in getting the Media Collection materials cataloged. Cross departmental support allowed the Assistant Head of Public Services to spend many hours each summer cataloging. Enthusiasm The Media LTA and the Assistant Head of Public Services were willing to spend the additional time if the result meant a collection that was finally accessible to patrons through the OPAC and not through notebooks.

8 METHODS FOR CROSS TRAINING Keys to success:  Must be flexible  Must not be overwhelmed by size or complexity of undertaking  Must establish a prioritized schedule of projects  Must have the support of your colleagues and library administration Scheduling:  Took advantage of the seasonal library instruction schedule when few library instruction sessions are scheduled during the summer academic sessions  Took advantage of December intersession break  Placed Public Services projects on hold during the summer  Coordinated the schedule for cross training and cataloging of the nonprint backlog with the calendar of ongoing and special projects maintained by the Technical Services Department (TSD)  Established a set time to work on cataloging nonprint backlog in the TSD Coordination between Technical Services and Public Services:  Held a Librarians Retreat which resulted in making the cataloging of the nonprint backlog a library-wide priority  Held weekly planning and training meetings of those involved in both departments  Maintained minutes of the weekly meetings and other decisions made for incorporation in the Technical Services Procedures Manual and to provide a history of the decisions  Redesigned the workflow in the TSD to incorporate training sessions and scheduling of equipment  Re-arranged shelving to accommodate ongoing projects.

9 Training The Non-Cataloger to Catalog Identified individuals with vested interest and ability:  Identified individuals who were interested in learning how to catalog and who had a stake in getting it done: the Assistant Head of Public Services and the Media LTA.  Built on previous experience with searching OCLC by the Assistant Head of Public Services as a cataloging student assistant in graduate school ten years prior. Developed training procedures:  Modified training procedures for OCLC that had been created the previous year for the Technical Services Staff.  Developed procedures and policies as we went along and added them to the Technical Services Procedures Manual. Divided project into manageable components:  Began with small projects: searching OCLC, identifying the appropriate record, modifying the 049 field, producing and exporting the record. The Technical Services LTA finished the process by adding the items after the records were exported into our database.  Each new cataloging project added additional cataloging steps, so that within 6 months, the Assistant Head of Public Services was performing all of the steps required to catalog the backlog: locating records in OCLC, exporting records, making local modifications, assigning call numbers.

10  Assistant Head of Public Services learned on the job (often making educated guesses) and by cataloging large amounts of the same type of material. Additional challenges were cataloging materials that had been in the library, had circulated, and did not have original housing or production information available.  Assistant Head of Public Services and Media LTA read and re-read basic cataloging texts, including:  Bibliographic Formats & Standards (OCLC)  Cataloging of Audiovisual Materials (3 rd ed.)  Cataloging of Audiovisual and Other Special Materials (4 th ed.)  Cataloging Unpublished Nonprint Materials (1992)  Describing Music Materials (1997)  Using OCLC (1990) Allowed for evolving level of ability to catalog and increasing difficulty of materials to be cataloged.  Training continued on an “as needed” basis with regular meetings held between the Head of Technical Services and the Assistant Head of Public Services to discuss cataloging questions, problems, and solutions.  Utilized the skills of available personnel and encouraged autonomy of cataloging decisions.  Assistant Head of Public Services had a talent for cataloging, picked it up quickly, and assumed the bulk of the cataloging responsibilities.  Media LTA took over the database clean up, cataloging prep responsibilities (weeding, evaluating, locating all items, etc.), and final processing of newly cataloged materials.  Used additional Reference Librarians to help with inventory and with viewing videotapes for production credits, etc.

11 Cataloging Procedures Developed 1. SLS guidelines for Audiovisual Materials. 2. Brief cataloging records in NOTIS for videotapes and other backlog audiovisual materials. 3. Guide sheet for NonPrint materials with: Bib location, Bib Level, Material type, ICode2, Itype, Item location, OPAC Display Label, Description. Guide sheet for Material types with Itype, OPAC label, locations. 4. Defaults created for III, including on-the fly records, copy cataloging records, and original cataloging records. 5. Copy cataloging from OCLC and downloading OCLC records. 6. Creating on-the-fly records. 7. Media cataloging problems shelf. 8. Cataloging and processing of: Videos, Kits, Games, Scores, Big Books, Media Periodicals LP’s, with ANSCR classification scheme Compact Discs, with split classification schemes, assigning additional subject headings Interactive multimedia CD-ROM's and back of the book CD-ROM's Audiocassettes, including children’s music cassettes, spoken word cassettes, and music cassettes Realia, Puppets, Models with designated call numbers Maps, Posters, Pictures, with designated call numbers combined with local classification scheme Textbooks, with local classification scheme

12 Results % of materials housed in Media Collection are accessible in the online catalog % of materials housed in Media Collection are accessible in the online catalog Media Collection materials are arranged on the shelves in the following locations: “LC” collection Backlog (in locked cabinets) Periodicals (in file cabinet) LP’s CD’s Duplicating Masters Big Books Horry County curriculum guides Scores (in file cabinet) Videos 2000 Media Materials are arranged on the shelves in the following locations: Media Media Video Media Phonodisc

13 Results Circulation Statistics: ,207 total media items circulated ,263 total media items circulated64% increase ,805 videos circulated videos circulated47% increase ,227 media location items circulated ,340 media location items circulated 51% increase Future Plans: Finish database clean-up. Load library holding tapes into OCLC. Catalog K-12 textbook collection.

14 DEFINITIONS ACRONYMS IIIInnovative Interfaces Inc. KLKimbel Library TERMINOLOGY Backlog “True” backlog, no records in OCLC, housed in Technical Services. Uncataloged Backlog Items held by KL, never searched in OCLC, never cataloged, but available for circulation. Pseudo LC CollectionCirculation materials on Media shelves with LC call numbers but no MARC cataloging and never listed in either the card or online catalogs. LC CollectionCataloged materials (with LC classification number). Brief RecordAn incomplete cataloging record that contains a minimum of information and is created in our local database until it can be overlaid from OCLC with a complete or full record. On the Fly RecordA non-MARC record created to enable material to circulate; When returned by the patron, the material receives full cataloging. Media CollectionCurriculum materials for K-12 and nonprint materials. Videos, sound cassettes, audio cassettes, software, CDs, LPs, kits, math manipulatives, realia, textbooks, monographs, periodicals, “big books”, duplicating masters, posters, pictures, music scores, maps.


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