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Safety in an Imaging Lab Chemicals Common chemicals Handling Disposal, waste management Cleaning and exposure Equipment Radiation Electrical safety Servicing.

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Presentation on theme: "Safety in an Imaging Lab Chemicals Common chemicals Handling Disposal, waste management Cleaning and exposure Equipment Radiation Electrical safety Servicing."— Presentation transcript:

1 Safety in an Imaging Lab Chemicals Common chemicals Handling Disposal, waste management Cleaning and exposure Equipment Radiation Electrical safety Servicing Physical and Mechanical Hazards Read Chapter 21 in Bozzola text!

2 Appropriate Clothing Long pants Closed toe shoes Lab Coat Eye safety (goggles, face shield) Gloves Particle mask

3 Primary HazardColor Code FlammablesRed Toxics/HealthBlue Reactives/OxidizersYellow Contact HazardsWhite GeneralGray, Green, Orange Many labs color code bottles to aid in segregated chemical storage. The assignments given above are standard for most labs and are based upon chemical manufacturer’s color code designations. Liquids should also be stored away from solids.

4 Chemicals found in an EM lab Aldehydes (glutaraldehyde, paraformaldehyde) Carcinogenic, allergies, sensitivity Minimize exposure to fumes Cacodylate salts ~50% arsenic Carcinogenic, toxic Readily absorbed through skin (garlic taste) Osmium tetroxide (osmic acid) Toxic, irritant, volitile Spills reduced to metallic osmium with corn oil or Na Ascorbate powder, then cat litter to pick up.

5 Acetone and alcohols Used as solvents, dehydrants and cleaners Flammable- keep in flammables cabinet Toxic Chemicals dissolved in them can penetrate skin Propylene oxide Highly flammable Carcinogen Picric acid Dried salts explosive Resin Components Carcinogenic Allergic reactions when using antihistamines Heavy metal salts (lead and uranium) Toxic Carcinogenic

6 MSDS Sheets Rooms 158, 159 and 165 Information regarding: Basic chemical makeup Hazards and treatment Handling and clean up Transportation Obtained from: Original vendor On-line University Environ. Safety (http://www.esd.uga.edu/)

7 Handling Wear: Gloves Lab coat Dust mask Closed toe shoes Work deep in ventilation hood Measuring: New spatula for each chemical Minimize dust Have clean-up equipment available All spills are hazardous waste Clean after yourself !

8 Disposal Spent, expired, or surplus chemicals Minimize waste! Use less toxic alternatives if available. Use a minimal amount - avoid large amounts. Keep Waste in separate containers - avoid mixing Some can be recycled. Easier to keep track of amounts for manifests. Some chemicals are not compatible. Clean up after yourself!

9 Clean Up! Always clean up any spills, messes. Make a spill kit Mercury difficult to clean up Can’t wipe or pick up Use a vacuum with trap, not vacuum cleaner (volatilizes the mercury) Treat the Cleaning materials as hazardous waste -Not into trash can or down sink

10 Emergency showers and eye washes Room 158 and room 165

11 An inexpensive spill kit can be made with kitty litter and other items such as gloves, safety glasses, a broom, and a dust pan. Kitty litter is an excellent all purpose absorbent and should be kept in labs where high volumes of solvents are stored. (Rooms 158, 160, 165)

12 Equipment hazards Vacuum evaporators and sputter coaters Electrical shock Evaporated metals easily taken up Hot components (burns) Implosion of bell jar CPD High pressures in bomb Liquid CO2 - freeze damage Fumes - ethanol or CO2 Explosive venting

13 Pumps Oil filters to minimize inhaling Liquid N2 and compressed gasses Explosion of tank SF6 gas – changes to toxic Fluorine if heated above 200 C X-ray exposure

14 Physical damage Cuts Razor Blades Glass knives Symptoms of mercury poisoning include tremors, tunnel vision, loss of balance, slurred speech, and unpredictable emotions. Inhalation Mercury bulbs can explode if old and overheated (usually after hours of use).

15 Laser and UV Light Safety “Please do not look into laser with remaining eye…”

16 UV lamp Avoid looking directly at lamp or UV illumination at microscope. Check hours on lamp. If high (above 300 hrs) please advise staff. If bulb breaks, leave room immediately and close door. Inform staff.

17 Laser Do not sit at eye-level with mirrors and laser. Wear eye protection. Turn down power if aligning to path in optical areas. Keep door closed and locked, provide warning outside door.

18 Laser- Do not sit at eye-level with mirrors and laser. Wear eye protection. Turn down power if aligning to path in optical areas. Keep door closed and locked, provide warning outside door.

19 Laser – Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation Do not sit at eye-level with mirrors and laser. Wear eye protection. Turn down power if aligning to path in optical areas. Keep door closed and locked, provide warning outside door.

20 Lab tour at 3:30 – 153 Barrow Hall

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