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Coaching Makes a Difference

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1 Coaching Makes a Difference
Welcome Oregon Scaling-up EBISS Coaching Makes a Difference SHARPENING YOUR LISTENING SKILLS Scaling-Up Oregon Welcome to Coaching Makes A Difference. This is part 2 of a 4 part series that will give you the tools and strategies to engage in Sharpening Your Listening Skills.

2 Kathleen Ryan Jackson, D. Ed.
Erin A. Chaparro, Ph.D. Oregon Scaling-Up EBISS Blog Please contact Erin Chaparro if you encounter problems accessing the Blog I am Kathleen Ryan Jackson here at the Center on Teaching and Learning at the University of Oregon. Remember you can access all of the training materials from this years EBISS trainings from our blog address. If you have any questions please feel free to contact Myself or Erin at the addresses provided. If you experience technical difficulties please contact Erin for assistance.

3 Thank You The National Reading First & Technical Assistance Center https://www.k12.wa.us/Reading/pubdocs/Dissemination_7ACollectionofOnlineResAboutScientificallyBasedK-3ReadingInst.pdf State Implementation and Scaling-up of Evidence Based Practices (SISEP) Before we get started I want to thank our colleagues at the National Reading First & Technical Assistance Center and the State Implementation and Scaling-up of Evidence Based Practices for the contribution of their research and the tools and strategies I will share in todays webinar.

4 Knowledge Check Do you know the three key components of building the coaching relationship? What are a few examples of powerful communication strategies? Before we get started lets do a knowledge check. Do you know the three key components of building the coaching relationship? Or a few examples of powerful communication strategies? By the end of this webinar you should be able to answer both of these questions and explain it to someone else.

5 Purpose Provide coaches with tools and strategies to develop effective listening skills. Learn strategies and routines that support effective coaching communication in order to develop trust, confidence and rapport with the colleagues you coach. Probably my best quality as a coach is that I ask a lot of challenging questions and let the person come up with the answer Phil Dixon The purpose of this webinar is to: Provide coaches with tools and strategies to develop effective listening skills. Learn strategies and routines that support effective coaching communication in order to develop trust, confidence and rapport with the colleagues you coach. And to:

6 Sharpening Your Listening Skills
Learning Objective Understand critical components of building a sustainable coaching relationship Apply communication strategies to strengthen your listening skills and other’s abilities to find solutions to difficult questions Outcome Walk away with tools and strategies that you can immediately put into practice Todays learning objectives are to: Understand critical components of building a sustainable coaching relationship And Apply communication strategies to strengthen your listening skills and other’s abilities to find solutions to difficult questions And my desired outcome is that all of you will walk away with tools and strategies that you can immediately put into practice

7 Implementation Drivers
COACHING Competency Organization Remember Coaching is is one of the competency drivers that ensures staff have the skills they require to implement your district’s practices with a high level of fidelity. Leadership © Fixsen & Blase, 2009

8 Coaching Competency Driver
Purpose: Ensure implementation occurs Support implementation fidelity Develop good judgment among all staff Provide feedback to inform training driver objectives And that the competency drivers Ensure implementation occurs Support implementation fidelity Develop good judgment among all staff And provide feedback to inform training driver objectives Scaling-Up Oregon

9 % who demonstrate knowledge
COACHING % who demonstrate knowledge % who demonstrate new skills in training setting % who use new skills in the classroom Training Components Knowledge Skill Demonstration Use in the Classroom Theory and Discussion 10% 5% 0% Demonstration in Classroom 30% 20% Practice and Feedback in Training 60% Coaching in the Classroom 95% Don’t forget, the research says we have to follow-up each training with coaching in the classroom if all students are to benefit from our practices Joyce and Showers (2002)

10 Evidence-Based Observation and Feedback
Four Components Claim – Statement that ties teacher/team member performance to a certain skill Evidence – Quote or literal description of what the teacher/team did (documentation) Interpretation – Statement of what the teacher/team behavior accomplished Judgment – Sentence or phrase that tells the reader what the writer thought of the behavior Remember from Webinar #1 that EBO&F is a powerful strategy to help coaches focus on the facts. The four components are: To make a Claim To show Evidence To provide your Interpretation And finally to make a judgment based on the evidence

11 Sharpening Your Skills Using Evidence-Based Observation & Feedback
Just the Facts! Evidence Based Observation & Feedback Reflection How good are you at providing evidence-based feedback? What is the challenge of consistently providing evidence-based feedback? Are you tempted to offer your opinions freely and often? What are the implications of both? If you had the opportunity to practice these skills you can reflect on the biggest challenge you faced and if you were tempted to offer your opinions?

12 Coaching Communication and The Art of Really Listening
Building the coaching relationship Communication strategies Committed listening Today we will focus on Coaching Communication and The Art of Really Listening. We will learn how to build the coaching relationship using communication strategies for committed listening Scaling-Up Oregon

13 Building the Coaching Relationship
Rapport: How you establish/maintain positive relationships with the individuals you coach Confidence: How those you coach feel about your skills & credibility Trust: How those you coach feel about your honesty Does your coaching team need to revitalize their coaching relationships? Consider Rapport and how you establish and maintain positive relationships with the individuals you coach Confidence and how those you coach feel about your skills & credibility And trust or how those you coach feel about your honesty A great activity is to have your coaching team reflect on what they do to build rapport, confidence and trust. Have your coaching team reflect on what they do to build rapport, confidence and trust. ACTIVITY

14 Building Coaching Relationships
On sticky notes, individuals write what has worked for them in the areas of building rapport, confidence, and trust. Post ideas on three charts around the room labeled rapport-confidence-trust . Share out ideas Set goals/criteria for continued development of coaching relationships. Does your coaching team need to revitalize their coaching relationships? Here is a great activity On sticky notes, individuals write what has worked for them in the areas of building rapport, confidence, and trust. Post their ideas on three charts around the room. Allow 10 minutes. Here are a few tips: Rapport starters: Make eye contact and listen with genuine interest. Be curious - show interest in your teachers as individuals. When talking and asking questions, provide plenty of wait time. Be understanding (but don’t accept excuses for students’ poor progress.) Confidence starters: Be on time! Be prepared! Be visible around the school and in classrooms (not in an office behind a desk!). Teacher asks you for a specific resource and you provide it the next day. Trust starters: Be honest about your own time if you are unable to meet a previously established deadline (Covey, 2006). If a teacher confides in you that she hasn’t really been able to squeeze in extra fluency practice and is embarrassed to talk about it at a team meeting, you decide to support her in the classroom rather than sharing it with the whole group. ACTIVITY

15 Building Rapport Rapport Smile! Establish personal connections
Promote team-building/really be a part of the team Engage on many levels Provide assistance Display interest Presenter’s notes Note: As speaker moves through next 3 slides, co-presenter (if there is one) collects and reviews the charts and shares some ideas after each applicable slide. Co-presenter also asks for any other ideas from the audience that relate to bullets on these slides. These are some basic ideas. We’ll look at your examples from the activity because you’re likely to share more advanced ideas. Rapport is crucial so that initial classroom visits are successful and ongoing visits are welcomed. RAPPORT Smile! Always a good thing. Establish personal connections. Make sure you know what teachers really want to be called (Patricia, not Pat). Know the names of their students. Promote team-building and be a part of the team. Start a club. Sit with your teachers at faculty meetings. Develop opportunities for teachers to collaborate (ex: observe one another, check on each other to see where they are in scope and sequence, share ideas about materials and resources). Engage on many levels. Eat lunch with your teachers when possible. Provide assistance. Help to set up or rearrange the class. Find their interests and ask about them. Take an interest in the staff and value their input. Give and use surveys. Scaling-Up Oregon

16 Building Confidence Confidence Follow through
Develop expertise of innovations and EBP Communicate with conviction Take responsibility when things don’t work Encourage multiple options/solutions Presenter’s notes Confidence One of the biggest things you can do to win a teacher’s trust and confidence is to follow through. If you say you’re going to do something, do it! Especially the first one or two times you are responding to a request, try to follow up as quickly as possible. When teachers ask you a question or make a request, make it your goal to respond within a day or two. The crucial words you need to have in your vocabulary to be an effective coach: “I don’t know.” They must always be uttered along with this follow up statement: “but I’ll get back to you.” Effective coaches are up to date on SBRR. You have to REMAIN up-to-date. That means maintaining ties to your professional organizations, reading journals, attending conferences, etc. It is especially important to know the programs your school uses inside and out. Communicate with conviction. Remember the opening quote on slide three about leaders and effective communication. You have to exude confidence - not that you know everything, but that you will be able to find some way to help with a solution. Own your mistakes. Have an attitude of “if at first we don’t succeed, we’ll try, try again!” Be willing to try a variety of ways to get results. Share ideas from the chart created with participants earlier.

17 Building Trust Trust Ensure confidentiality
Clarify roles and responsibilities Align yourself with those you coach And finally, here are some examples of building trust Ensure confidentiality Clarify roles and responsibilities Align yourself with those you coach According to Covey in the Speed of Trust, “The truth is that in every relationship - personal and professional - what you do has far greater impact than anything you say.” “Good words have their place. They signal behavior. They declare intent. They can create enormous hope. And when those words are followed by validating behavior, they increase trust, sometimes dramatically.” (Covey, 2006) If you have not done so already, explicitly ask your teachers what form of communication works best for them. Don’t assume that they all check multiple times a day. However, be sure that teachers know you WILL be making informal, unscheduled classroom visits where you will just observe and then maybe come back to model a skill at an agreed upon time. Teachers should be reminded that you will maintain a presence in classrooms for the purpose of supporting them and staying connected to kids and what’s happening in classrooms. Maintain understanding that coaches are a part of every team. Lets look at Activity 3.1 EXTRA TIPS Align yourself with the teachers. Be seen around the building with teachers, not always next to or with the administrator. Need to separate yourself somewhat from the administrators just so that teachers see that what you are saying - that you are not an evaluator - is true. Of course you will still work closely with the administrators and meet with them, but if there were a luncheon, you’d sit at the teachers’ table, not the administrators’ table. Handout 3.1 What I Will, May, Won’t Do

18 Have you put in writing what you will and will not do as a coach?
I have found that it is essential to develop a common understanding regarding what you will, may and wont do. This is an example for a literacy coach. I think it is important for administration and coaches to develop a similar matrix so there are consistent decision rules regarding the coaches role. Handout 3.1

19 Rapport, Confidence, Trust
Consider your skills in the areas of rapport, trust, confidence: What do you feel best about? What needs improvement? Think about your own coaching. Consider your current skills in these three areas. Turn to a partner and ask. Partner asks What areas do you need to revisit? What will you do to improve? Then switch roles! Reflection What areas do you need to revisit and improve?

20 Communication Strategies
Nonverbal gestures reflecting positive, open, attentive attitude Active listening Nonjudgmental reflection statements Feedback that focuses on student outcomes Paraphrasing Questioning Summarizing Presenter’s notes Handout 3.2 provides you with examples of Communication Strategies across these 7 strategies For example they describe: Nonverbal gestures: like reflecting a positive, open, attentive attitude (e.g., positive or neutral facial expressions, leaning forward, maintain eye contact, remaining relaxed).

21 Communication Strategies Practice
Take a look at the examples provided for each strategy and then identify a classroom scenario you found yourself in and describe the observable tools, strategies, and actions that you used – or could have used for a few of the communication strategies on this handout. Active listening goes beyond just hearing the words being spoken. Involves understanding and interpreting the meaning behind what is said. Acknowledge understanding by nodding head and/or regularly interject statements, such as “Oh, I see. Please continue.” Avoid frequent interruptions. Nonjudgmental reflection statements focus on the speaker’s feelings, rather than evaluating actions (e.g., “You have really tried to incorporate that strategy. It’s no wonder you are frustrated.”). Providing corrective feedback that focuses on changing student learning (e.g., “Let’s try teaching the strategy another way to see if we can improve students’ understanding” instead of “Your strategy instruction was not very effective”). Paraphrasing restates the meaning of the speaker’s words. Do not echo the speaker’s words, but help clarify the essential facts and communicate understanding. Questioning promotes open communication with the speaker. Questions can help to clarify information and encourage elaboration (e.g., “Can you tell me more about how you scaffolded instruction with this group of students?”). Open-ended questions and prompts can also help teachers identify instructional needs (e.g., “What are your concerns about using this procedure with your struggling readers?”). Summarizing during a conversation clarifies important conclusions and keeps the conversation from rambling and/or getting off topic. Handout 3.2

22 Practice and Role Play Table Practice
Scenario: You identify that during a 15 minute observation of math instruction 2/25 student’s responded to the teacher’s questions 6 times each. When you present THE FACTS the teacher shows a high level of frustration when the SEE ME NOTE says, Lets get together and talk about how we can increase all students’ opportunity to respond. Table Practice Use 7 communication strategies. Respond to the scenario using each communication strategy. Here is an example of how to practice and role play this activity. Place a copy of this scenario on the participants’ tables Have table participants’ number off from Each participant uses the numbered strategy from the previous slide that matches his or her number. Whatever the table size, do all strategies. Each participant responds to the scenario using the designated strategy. Ask participants to share their responses. Handout 3.2

23 Facilitate-Collaborate-Instruct ….in a seamless manner
Scaling-Up Oregon

24 Revisit Effective Communication Strategies
Discuss with your colleagues your experiences as a coach using these communication strategies. What gives you the most trouble? What tips do you have for making these strategies work? It is important to be specific in your feedback during observations. You want to carefully question and summarize during a grade level team discussion about sticky issues. And use active listening and paraphrasing with a teacher who is discouraged about her inability to increase the fluency levels of her lowest performing students. Talk with your colleagues about your experiences and answer the two questions on the slide. What gives you the most trouble? What tips do you have for making these strategies work? Discussion point How do you use communication strategies in coaching?

25 Sharpening Your Skills LISTENING
Are You Listening? Question: What is the opposite of speaking? Many would say listening is the opposite of speaking. Yet, too often in conversations, the reality is that rather than listening, the “listener” is merely waiting to talk! What gets in the way of listening? We often wait to talk and plan our own responses rather than really hearing what a teacher is saying much of the time. Ask: What is the opposite of speaking? Many would say listening is the opposite of speaking. Yet, too often in conversations, the reality is that rather than listening, the “listener” is merely waiting to talk!

26 The first step in these conversations is committed listening.
Effective coaching happens in conversations when the teacher (or team member) “walks away feeling inspired, empowered, and enabled to act.” -Hargrove, 2003 The first step in these conversations is committed listening. According to Hargrove, Effective coaching happens in conversations when the teacher (or team member) “walks away feeling inspired, empowered, and enabled to act.” He goes on to say that Committed Listening helps detangle the “big ball of twine – the tangle of problems, dilemmas, puzzles, and emotional reactions” you may encounter in your coaching.

27 Are You Listening? Practice really listening with a partner:
Have a partner talk for 3 minutes sharing a challenging or negative experience from a coaching session. Provide no verbal response during the three minutes. Just listen and the debrief. Now trade roles. We know we are attracted to people who listen to what we’re saying. Try this focused/committed listening exercise with a partner. The point is to really experience the effects of “just listening” both as the listener and as the speaker. In this texercise, there is no conflict between the listener and speaker as sometimes is the case. Just get the feeling of focusing only on what your partner is saying, listening with commitment and true interest, and refraining from planning your next response. Many of us practice active listening and paraphrasing – excellent skills for coaches. However, focused or committed listening takes these important skills to another level. 1. Have a partner talk for 3 minutes sharing a challenging or negative experience from a coaching session. 2. Provide no verbal response during the three minutes. Just listen and the debrief. 3. Now trade roles. ACTIVITY

28 Closing Comments… Recognize that…
Sometimes we are not committed listeners This has a direct impact on our coaching effectiveness Recognize that… Sometimes we are not committed listeners And that this has a direct impact on our coaching effectiveness Scaling-Up Oregon

29 General Tips Be as clear and explicit yourself as you expect teachers or team members to be Focus on the issue Request and give feedback Invite more information Here are some general tips. Be as clear and explicit with teachers as you want them to be with their students. Focus on the issue. Especially when topics are difficult, it is natural to stray away from the point, because it is uncomfortable to discuss the topic at hand. Your job is to gently nudge the conversation back toward the focus. This may mean acknowledging or sometimes ignoring comments that stray from the focus. If a teacher is venting about a colleague, just ignore it and say, “What would be helpful for us to discuss next concerning x,y,z, so that we can reach a positive solution?” And request and give feedback. Ask questions like, “What do you think of that?” “Does that sound like an idea that may work?” Give feedback, such as, “I think you’ve come up with several good options.” and “Perhaps it would be beneficial to meet with the rest of the grade-level team to get some ideas.” Invite more information. After you have listened carefully, pause, then ask, “Is there anything else you’d like to say about that?” Or, “Is there something you want to add?” This gives the teacher a moment to pause and think, and it also shows that you are interested in hearing everything that the teacher has to say about the topic at hand. Scaling-Up Oregon

30 Strengthening Communication
Final Reflection: Think of a teacher or team conversation that you’d like to replay. What have you learned today that would help you do it better? Turn and Talk: Share your reflection with a partner. Next Steps: What communication skills will I work on? For a final Reflection: Think of a teacher or team conversation that you’d like to replay. What have you learned today that would help you do it better? Turn and Talk: Share your reflection with a partner. Plan Next Steps: What communication skills will I work on to strengthen my communication skills? Reflection

31 Successful communication depends on “one all-too-elusive ability: to really listen.“ This requires that within conflict situations we quiet our mind’s conversation and stop planning our next response and defending ourselves against criticism. We simply need to be still, on every level – and just listen! -Glaser & Glaser 2006 Successful communication depends on “one all-too-elusive ability: to really listen.“ This requires that within conflict situations we quiet our mind’s conversation and stop planning our next response and defending ourselves against criticism. We simply need to be still, on every level – and just listen!

32 Knowledge Check The three key components of building the coaching relationship are: Rapport, confidence and trust A few examples of powerful communication strategies are: Active listening, paraphrasing, summarizing Lets Check our knowledge. The three key components of building the coaching relationship are: -Rapport, confidence and trust A few examples of powerful communication strategies are: -Active listening, paraphrasing, and summarizing

33 Thank You Kathleen Ryan Jackson kmj@uoregon.edu
Erin A. Chaparro, Ph.D. Thank you for attending todays Webinar. I hope you plan on viewing Coaching Makes a Difference Part 3 Expanding and Refining the Coaches Role. Please feel free to me with any questions and have a great day.


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