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WELCOME! Please find your table & sit in a seat that has a packet. Meet your neighbors.

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Presentation on theme: "WELCOME! Please find your table & sit in a seat that has a packet. Meet your neighbors."— Presentation transcript:

1 WELCOME! Please find your table & sit in a seat that has a packet. Meet your neighbors.

2 An Introduction to CHAMPs Marcie Duley

3 Expectations for Today Please check your cell phone to make sure it is turned to silent. Please keep your phone on the table so you can answer it quickly. If you have to take a call, please step outside. If you must have a conversation with someone at your table during the presentation please keep it brief and quiet.

4 Please feel free to ask questions. Let us know if there is anything we can do differently to make this a more positive experience. In addition to the presentation of new information, today’s session will involve opportunities for you to reflect on your own teaching practices and to discuss strategies with colleagues. Expectations for Today

5 There will be scheduled breaks, but please excuse yourself if our breaks don’t fit your needs. Today’s session belongs to you and its success rests with your active participation. Take advantage of the opportunities to share strategies with the other people at your table—we can learn a lot from each other’s experiences. Expectations for Today

6 Schedule 11:00 Introduction and Rationale 11:30 Rules 12:00 Consequences 12:30 BREAK 12:40 Expectations 1:40 Wrap Up/What’s Next? Page 1

7 Factors to Consider in Developing a Classroom Management Plan Teacher Personality (go Gallup!) Student Needs Effective Schools Research

8 Look at the Management and Discipline Planning Form. Fill in this form based on the students you taught LAST year. Add up the total score for YOUR students. Page 2

9 Please Stand Up If you scored 0 to 30 you may sit down If you scored you may sit down If you scored you may sit down If you scored you may sit down

10 10 “Survey says…” 0-30 LOW: Students can be successful with LOW, MEDIUM, or HIGH MEDIUM: Students need MEDIUM or HIGH structure HIGH: Students need HIGH structure Page 3

11 11 Task 7: Classroom Structure (Example) Using the pencil sharpener Low Structure 1) When someone is not teaching or speaking to the class. 2) When you need to sharpen your pencil. Medium Structure 1) When there is no line at the pencil sharpener. 2) Sharpen quietly with no talking. 3) Respect personal space of others along your way. High Structure 1) Always have two sharpened pencils for class. 2) Raise hand for permission before going to the sharpener. 3) Sharpen and return quickly and quietly to your area.

12 Look at the second copy of the Management and Discipline Planning Form. For Question 2 choose 5 (10 to 60 %) For Question 3 choose 5 (10 to 50 %) Page 2

13 Fill in the rest of this form based on the information about the students you will teach THIS year. Add up the total score for YOUR students. Page 2

14 Round 2 If your score for THIS year is higher than your score for LAST year please stand up. If your score is higher than 50 please stand up.

15 15 “Survey says…” 0-30 LOW: Students can be successful with LOW, MEDIUM, or HIGH MEDIUM: Students need MEDIUM or HIGH structure HIGH: Students need HIGH structure Page 3

16 16 Task 7: Classroom Structure (Example) Using the pencil sharpener Low Structure 1) When someone is not teaching or speaking to the class. 2) When you need to sharpen your pencil. Medium Structure 1) When there is no line at the pencil sharpener. 2) Sharpen quietly with no talking. 3) Respect personal space of others along your way. High Structure 1) Always have two sharpened pencils for class. 2) Raise hand for permission before going to the sharpener. 3) Sharpen and return quickly and quietly to your area.

17 Most HHS students need high structure (not being mean!!!). If the students you have taught in the past did not need high structure, you will need to make some adjustments to your classroom management plan to achieve the same results.

18 18 CHAMPs: What it is NOT 1.A Canned Program 2.Another “Bandwagon” 3.Just a Product 4.All teachers ARE NOT expected to have the same classroom management plan!

19 19 CHAMPs: What IS it? 1.A set of decisions the teacher must make in order to structure for OUR STUDENTS TODAY. 2.A “Template” 3.A Process 4.An Acronym 5.A Common Language among staff members

20 Objectives for Today Identify the level of structure your students need Explain the importance of providing the appropriate level of structure for your students Identify characteristics of good rules and evaluate your classroom rules Given characteristics of effective consequences, evaluate your consequences List the parts of the CHAMP acronym and create a CHAMP for one activity in your classroom.

21 21 Do You Have Students… talking too much or too loudly or about the wrong things? demanding attention? doing math when they should be working on science? socializing when they should be cleaning up the classroom? wandering around the room when they are supposed to be listening to the teacher? monopolizing classroom discussions? disrupting lessons?

22 22 The research says that you can avoid most (if not all) of these problems… …by clearly defining for yourself and then communicating to your students how you expect them to behave… …during each classroom activity and transition that occurs during the school day.

23 3 Categories of Students Universal—60-75% Targeted—20% Intensive—7-8% Page 4

24 Universal--Given appropriate structure these students will do what we want them to most of the time Targeted--These students will need a little more structure to be successful; they often move one way or the other; we can influence which way they move Intensive--These students are the “chronic” kids who misbehave repeatedly; changing their behavior is very difficult Page 4

25 Implications If you provide the appropriate amount of structure you can prevent a large portion of potential misbehavior in your classroom We should spend more time promoting responsible behavior than dealing with irresponsible behavior (building positive relationships!!!)

26 Preventing Misbehavior Structure your class for success –Rules and Consequences –Clear Expectations for Activities and Transitions Develop Positive Relationships with Students and Families

27 List your classroom rules How many of you had a hard time listing your rules? Were your rules posted in a highly visible location? How did you come up with your classroom rules? How do you know when a student has broken one of your rules? Page 5

28 Implications If you are going to be able to enforce your rules, you have to know what they are and you have to be able to quickly tell when a rule has been broken. If you expect students to follow your rules, they have to know what the rules are and when they have broken a rule.

29 Characteristics of Good Rules Effective Rules are: Stated Positively Specific statements that refer to observable behavior Applicable at ALL times during the period Few in number (3-6) Page 6

30 30 What to AVOID when Developing Classroom Rules Vagueness –“Treat others like you want to be treated.” –“Do your best.” Broad Values – “Guidelines for Success” –“Be respectful.” –“Be responsible.” Classroom Expectations –“Raise hand before speaking.” –“Before leaving your seat, get permission.” Classroom Procedures –“Go to your seat when you enter the room.” –“Wait for the bell to ring before leaving your desk.”

31 Examples Which of these is a better rule? Why? 1.Raise your hand before speaking. 2.Follow directions the first time they are given.

32 Examples Which of these is a better rule? Why? 1.Be responsible. 2.Bring all necessary materials to class.

33 5 Main Categories of Rules Compliance (Follow directions) On Task (Stay on task during all work times) On Time (Be in your seat when the bell rings) Interaction (Watch voice tone, body language and words when interacting) Preparation (Come to class with all necessary materials) Page 6

34 Reflection Look again at your classroom rules: –Do they meet the criteria? Stated positively Specific and observable Applicable ALL period Few in number –Are there any rules you would change based on our discussion? –Are there any rules you need to add or remove from your list? Page 6

35 Take a 10 minute break

36 List your Consequences for Classroom Rule Violations Page 5

37 Oregon Speed Limit

38 38 It’s not the SEVERITY of your consequences that will make them effective…it’s the CERTAINTY

39 Effective Consequences Consequences must be implemented consistently. The severity of the consequence should match the offense. A consistently implemented mild consequence is more effective than an inconsistently implemented harsher one. Page 7

40 Common Consequences First Offense—Verbal Warning Second Offense—15 minute D-Hall Third Offense—30 min D-Hall & parent call Fourth Offense—Office Referral

41 Example: One of your rules is “Keep hands, feet and objects to yourself.” Is it reasonable for a student to get an office referral the fourth time he “borrows” another student’s pencil without permission? Are YOU willing to write the referral every time this happens? Ok, maybe extreme, but do ya get the point?

42 Possible Consequences Time Owed (15-30 seconds after class) Point System (Students gain or lose points based on behavior) D-Hall Restitution Referral—use only for severe or chronic misbehavior Consequences for Classroom Rule Violations

43 Duley’s Discipline Plan –First Offense: Verbal Warning –Second Offense: 30 sec time owed after class –Third Offense: 20 minute D-hall** (dishes) –Fourth Offense: 20 min D-hall** and parent contact (plus wash lab dishes) –Fifth Offense: Referral to principal **The “content” of the D-hall would vary depending on the offense Page 7

44 44 Steps to Managing Classroom Rule Violations Develop a range of mild responses you can establish for each rule infraction. Remember: It is a “parking ticket,” not the “firing squad.”

45 Reflection Look again at your consequences: –Do they meet the criteria? Are you hesitant to implement your consequences? Is the severity of your consequences appropriate for the rule violation? –What changes would you make to your consequences based on our discussion? Page 7

46 46 What Percentage of Time do these words represent to you? Always Sometimes Usually Frequently

47 47 Implications Students can hit any achievement target they can see… and that will sit still for them! - Dr. Richard Stiggins

48 Expectations— Design Clear Expectations for Behavior: Story about new teachers

49 49 When your expectations are clear, students never have to guess how you expect them to behave.

50 50 One Strategy TO TEACH EXPECTATIONS: The CHAMPs Acronym C – Conversation: Can students talk to each other during this activity/transition? H – Help: How can students get questions answered during this activity/transition? How do they get your attention? A – Activity: What is the task/objective of this activity/transition? What is the expected end product? What do you want to Accomplish? M – Movement: Can students move about during this activity/transition? P – Participation: What does appropriate student behavior for this activity look/sound like? How do students show that they are participating? Page 8

51 51 How many CHAMPs do I need? Look at the list of common classroom activities. Check the ones that you use in your classroom. Add any others that are not on this list. –Teacher-directed instruction –Independent seat work –Class discussions –Cooperative group work –Small group discussion –Taking tests/quizzes –Centers/lab stations, video/media presentation Page 9

52 52 Preview CHAMPs Activity Worksheets and the CHAMP Chart on page 25. Pages 13-16

53 Your CHAMP for Direct Instruction Think about how you want your students to behave while you are providing direct instruction (lecture, explanation, etc.)

54 54 Ask Yourself… HOW and WHEN … do you want students to have CONVERSATIONS? …do you want students to get your HELP? …do you want students to ACCOMPLISH YOUR ASSIGNED TASKS? …do you want students to MOVE ABOUT THE CLASSROOM? …do you want students to PARTICIPATE IN YOUR INSTRUCTION or ASSIGNED TASKS?

55 55 Preview BLANK CHAMPs Activity Worksheet Develop Expectations for ONE CLASSROOM ACTIVITY (Direct Instruction) Page 10 See page 25 for ideas

56 56 CHAMPs for Transitions Common Transitions –Before the bell rings (PREP) –Leaving at the end of the period (BYE) –Cleaning up after a group project –Moving to and from cooperative groups –Handing in work Page 9

57 The more structure your class requires, the more specific and tightly orchestrated you need to make your expectations for transitions.

58 58 Preview CHAMPs Transition Worksheets Pages 20-22

59 Closure A new teacher joins your team in August. They don’t understand why they need to spend time developing rules and expectations. They would prefer to give students more freedom in the classroom instead of “limiting” the students by providing so many boundaries. What would you say to this teacher to help them understand the importance of having clearly articulated rules and expectations?

60 You are CHAMPions!!! Best of luck Buffalos! Be sure to be… –NAUSEATINGLY CLEAR!!! –FIGURE OUT WHAT YOU WANT –COMMUNICATE WITH STUDENTS –BE OVERTLY POSITIVE WITH KIDS –BE CONSISENT AND IMMEDIATE –MAKE EXPECTATIONS VISIBLE


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