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Order Rodentia Family Geomyidae Diastema 1 pair incisors Ears shorter than tail External fur-lined pouches Tail less than ¾ length of head, body Hind feet.

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Presentation on theme: "Order Rodentia Family Geomyidae Diastema 1 pair incisors Ears shorter than tail External fur-lined pouches Tail less than ¾ length of head, body Hind feet."— Presentation transcript:

1 Order Rodentia Family Geomyidae Diastema 1 pair incisors Ears shorter than tail External fur-lined pouches Tail less than ¾ length of head, body Hind feet smaller than forefeet Geomys bursarius

2 Family Geomyidae Geomys busarius Plains Pocket Gopher

3 Geomys busarius Plains Pocket Gopher Description: Dark Brown or Black dorsally, slightly lighter ventrally; little or no hair on tail; 2 longitudinal grooves on each upper incisor. Size: total length mm, tail mm, hind foot 31-37mm, ear 6- 9mm, wt g Status: Common

4 Geomys busarius Plains Pocket Gopher Habitat: priarie, alfalfa fields, roadsides, ditches, pastures; prefers moist, deep sandy loam. Food: grasses, forbes, roots, underground stems Reproduction: solarity, except during breeding season; mate in late winter/early spring, one litter/yr, 1-6 young/litter

5 Geomys busarius Plains Pocket Gopher Interesting Facts: Burrow system may cover upto 5,000 sq ft. Estimated that Plains Pocket Gopher may move 52 cubic ft/yr (2 ½ tons)

6 Geomys busarius Plains Pocket Gopher References: Jones Jr., J. Knox and Elmer C. Birney Handbook of mammals of the north-central states. University of Minnesota Press. Minneapolis, Minnesota. University of Kansas. Mammals of Kansas. 29 September September 2004 Timm, Robert M photography.

7 Order Rodentia Family Heteromyidae Diastema 1 pair incisors Ears shorter than tail External fur-lined pouches Tail more than ¾ length of head, body Hind feet larger than forefeet Perognathus flavescens

8 Identification: Dorsum cinnamon with blackish hairs; venter lighter; light- colored patch behind ears and around eyes Distribution: West (Loess Hills), southeast, central Iowa Habitat: Grassy slopes; well drained; small burrows

9 Perognathus flavescens Diet: Seeds of grasses, other herbs Reproduction: 2-3 litters of 3- 8 annually Conservation: Endangered; several isolated populations

10 Order Rodentia Family Castoridae Diastema 1 pair incisors Ears shorter than tail Hind feet webbed Tail scaly, paddle- shaped Castor canadensis

11 Beaver Castor canadensis Charles Weyer Identification -Highly modified for semiaquatic habitat -Largest rodent in North America -Tail paddle shaped, flattened, scaly and nearly naked -Hind feet webbed -Total length cm -Weight 15-45kg -teeth angled so that continually sharpen because teeth continually grow boreal_library/animals/photos/beaver.jpg biologylabs/Images/Evol images/beaver.jpg

12 Beaver Castor canadensis Distribution and Conservation Status -Ranges over much of North America from northern Mexico to central Alaska -Occurs in suitable aquatic habitat but not a widely distributed as historic range -Common in Iowa in suitable habitats -Not endangered or threatened in Iowa or federal list me=CASTOR+CANADENSIShttp://www.natureserve.org/explorer/servlet/NatureServe?searchNa me=CASTOR+CANADENSIS+

13 Beaver Castor canadensis Habitat -Aquatic habitats of almost any kind streams, creeks, or ponds of low flow gradient and plentiful woody plants. -Avoids large lakes and fast moving streams. -Need water deep enough so that it doesn’t freeze to bottom because store food under ice -In many cases will modify waterway to meet their needs with dams made of trees sticks and mud. -Usually live in lodges in family groups, in water deep enough so entrance not froze over in winter. -Family groups have home range of.8 km around den. May maintain or than one dam or lodge. odge.jpg

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18 Beaver Castor canadensis Diet -Strictly Herbivores -Eat leaves, bark, and twigs of woody plants -Aquatic plants during summer -Will visit near by fields to eat crops -Cache food in winter under ice. Mainly woody plant bark, twigs, and branches t8/beaver2.jpg

19 Beaver Castor canadensis Reproduction -Breeding occurs January through March day gestation period -One litter per year with 1 to 9 offspring. -Females take 3 years to reach sexual maturity. Males take about one year. -Young stay with family group for about 2 years. -Live in family group with 3-6 individuals and one breeding female.

20 Beaver Castor canadensis Other -Keystone species -Do not hibernate, do enter torpor. -Primarily nocturnal but can be active at any time of day -Create wet land habitat, sponge up flood waters, prevent erosion, and filter water. -Damage timber stands and agricultural fields, damage roads, drainage ditches, septic systems, and other property through flooding and dam building. -In 1800’s trapped for pelts, almost destroyed many populations over much of natural range. Came back after drop in commercial value of pelts. -Still trapped for recreation in many states /ParkWise/Students/PhotoGallery/

21 References Comprehensive report, Castor canadensis. Retrieved from. Accessed on September 25 th, 2004.http://www.natureserve.org/explorer/servlet/NatureServe?searchNam e=CASTOR+CANADENSIS+ J. Knox Jones Jr., and Elmer C. Birney. Handbook of Mammals of the North Central United States University of Minnesota Press. Minneapolis, MN. Managing wildlife damage, Beavers (Castor canadensis). Retrieved from. Accessed on September 25 th, 2004.http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/wildlife/ / html#L2


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