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 Lewis Carroll Biography  Born Charles Lutwidge Dodgson in Cheshire, on January 27, 1832, the man who would become Lewis Carroll was an eccentric and.

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Presentation on theme: " Lewis Carroll Biography  Born Charles Lutwidge Dodgson in Cheshire, on January 27, 1832, the man who would become Lewis Carroll was an eccentric and."— Presentation transcript:

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2  Lewis Carroll Biography  Born Charles Lutwidge Dodgson in Cheshire, on January 27, 1832, the man who would become Lewis Carroll was an eccentric and an eclectic whose varied works have entertained, edified, enlightened, and evaded readers for over a century. The son of a vicar and his first cousin, Dodgson was a precocious child who showed early interest in both writing and mathematics. After studying mathematics at Christ Church, Oxford, from 1850-1854, Dodgson was appointed to a lectureship there, where he was to continue studying, remain unmarried, and prepare for holy orders for almost 30 years. Although he never reached the priesthood, he did reach the level of deacon. During his very successful academic career, he wrote extensively on mathematics and logic, among other subjects. However, it is not for his academic work that he is best remembered, but rather the works for children which he created under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll.  Dodgson was intensely interested in and an advocate for the freedom and wisdom of childhood, and wrote his books as pleasurable amusements for the people he admired. His muse, Alice Liddell was the young daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, who he wrote Alice's Adventures in Wonderland for in 1865. The work started out as an oral tale which he later wrote down as Alice's Adventures Underground, but later revised into Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In 1872, Carroll published Through the Looking-Glass, the sequel to Wonderland. The books were illustrated by Sir John Tenniel, a top political illustrator of the day, whose crisp etchings work with Carroll's sly text to create the world of Wonderland still known today. These books brought Carroll great fame and renown during his lifetime, but the shy Dodgson made a great effort to distance himself from the fame of his alterego Carroll. An intensely awkward and introverted man, he was almost unable to have interactions or friendships with adults, but was happy and at peace when around children. He spent most of his later years in the company of young children who he entertained with his stories and documented in his famous photography.  Recent scholarship has called into question Carroll's tarnished reputation. Dubbed the "Carroll Myth", the author's preoccupation with child photography has been set in the context of Victorian aesthetics, which held that nude children were an expression of innocence. Further, a close examination of his diaries and letters reveals that he enjoyed relationships with women of all ages. Also, many of the "children" with whom he was supposedly involved were, in fact, older teens and young women in their twenties. The myth has persisted mainly because his family withheld information on his relationships out of concern for his reputation. Ironically, this led many to believe he harbored an obsession for little girls.  Along with the Alice books, Carroll published Phantasmagoria and Other Poems in 1869, The Hunting of the Snark in 1876, and Sylvie and Bruno in 1893, though none of his other works were ever nearly as popular as the Alice duo either in his lifetime or afterwards. He died January 14, 1898 in Guilford, Surrey. Web URL

3  Alice is sitting with her sister outdoors when she spies a White Rabbit with a pocket watch. Fascinated by the sight, she follows the rabbit down the hole. She falls for a long time, and finds herself in a long hallway full of doors. There is also a key on the table, which unlocks a tiny door; through this door, she spies a beautiful garden. She longs to get there, but the door is too small. Soon, she finds a drink with a note that asks her to drink it. There is later a cake with a note that tells her to eat; Alice uses both, but she cannot seem to get a handle on things, and is always either too large to get through the door or too small to reach the key.  While she is tiny, she slips and falls into a pool of water. She realizes that this little sea is made of tears she cried while a giant. She swims to shore with a number of animals, most notably a sensitive mouse, but manages to offend everyone by talking about her cat's ability to catch birds and mice. Left alone, she goes on through the wood and runs into the White Rabbit. He mistakes her for his maid and sends her to fetch some things from his house. While in the White Rabbit's home, she drinks another potion and becomes too huge to get out through the door. She eventually finds a little cake which, when eaten, makes her small again.  In the wood again, she comes across a Caterpillar sitting on a mushroom. He gives her some valuable advice, as well as a valuable tool: the two sides of the mushroom, which can make Alice grow larger and smaller as she. The first time she uses them, she stretches her body out tremendously. While stretched out, she pokes her head into the branches of a tree and meets a Pigeon. The Pigeon is convinced that Alice is a serpent, and though Alice tries to reason with her the Pigeon tells her to be off.  Alice gets herself down to normal proportions and continues her trek through the woods. In a clearing she comes across a little house and shrinks herself down enough to get inside. It is the house of the Duchess; the Duchess and the Cook are battling fiercely, and they seem unconcerned about the safety of the baby that the Duchess is nursing. Alice takes the baby with her, but the child turns into a pig and trots off into the woods. Alice next meets the Cheshire cat (who was sitting in the Duchess's house, but said nothing). The Cheshire cat helps her to find her way through the woods, but he warns her that everyone she meets will be mad. Web URL

4  Alice goes to the March Hare's house, where she is treated to a Mad Tea Party. Present are the March Hare, the Hatter, and the Dormouse. Ever since Time stopped working for the Hatter, it has always been six o'clock; it is therefore always teatime. The creatures of the Mad Tea Party are some of the must argumentative in all of Wonderland. Alice leaves them and finds a tree with a door in it: when she looks through the door, she spies the door-lined hallway from the beginning of her adventures. This time, she is prepared, and she manages to get to the lovely garden that she saw earlier. She walks on through, and finds herself in the garden of the Queen of Hearts. There, three gardeners (with bodies shaped like playing cards) are painting the roses red. If the Queen finds out that they planted white roses, she'll have them beheaded. The Queen herself soon arrives, and she does order their execution; Alice helps to hide them in a large flowerpot.  The Queen invites Alice to play croquet, which is a very difficult game in Wonderland, as the balls and mallets are live animals. The game is interrupted by the appearance of the Cheshire cat, whom the King of Hearts immediately dislikes.  The Queen takes Alice to theGryphon, who in turn takes Alice to the Mock Turtle. The Gryphon and the Mock Turtle tell Alice bizarre stories about their school under the sea. The Mock Turtle's sings a melancholy song about turtle soup, and soon afterward the Gryphon drags Alice off to see the trial of the Knave of Hearts.The Knave of Heart's has been accused of stealing the tarts of the Queen of Hearts, but the evidence against him is very bad. Alice is appalled by the ridiculous proceedings. She also begins to grow larger. She is soon called to the witness stand; by this time she has grown to giant size. She refuses to be intimidated by the bad logic of the court and the bluster of the King and Queen of Hearts. Suddenly, the cards all rise up and attack her, at which point she wakes up. Her adventures in Wonderland have all been a fantastic dream.

5  Alice is sitting in a chair scolding her kitten, Kitty, when she notices the alternate world inside the Looking Glass. She determines to explore this other world, and as soon as she steps inside, she finds a place much like yet much different from her home. She encounters a smiling clock, animate chess pieces and a book with backwards text, but determined to see all of this amazing new place before she has to return, she abandons the living room and steps outside.  After a confusing romp through the garden, talking flowers direct Alice to the Red Queen, who informs Alice that she is a part of a giant chess game. Alice's goal is to become a queen herself, and the Red Queen instructs her that she must begin in this second square and inevitably reach the eighth square in order for this aspiration to be realized. She explains also a bit of the backwards nature of life in the Looking-Glass world.  Alice jumps over the first brook, which brings her to her first adventure. She finds herself in a carriage full of animals, and once she passes over the next brook, she realizes she is alone with an enlarged gnat from the carriage. She encounters Tweedledee and Tweedledum next, who dance, recite poetry and bicker. She is thrust into a shop which turns into a boat and then back into a shop. In that shop is an egg, which transforms into Humpty Dumpty.  Soldiers arrive at Humpty Dumpty's wall, and with them, she notices the White King, with whom she travels to town to see the Lion and the Unicorn battle. After sharing some cake with onlookers, she finds herself alone in the forest, until she is joined by two knights who fight to determine who will take her prisoner. The victor, the Red Knight, leads her to the brook that is the final barrier to her queenship.  Jumping over the final brook into the eighth square, Alice is joined by the Red and White Queens, who frustrate her with their impossible quizzing. She joins a feast that is being celebrated in her honor, but soon things begin to go awry, and suddenly, the Red Queen is actually her kitten, and she is back in her living room. Alice is left wondering who had been dreaming during her adventures in the Looking-Glass world. Web URL

6  After crossing the sea guided by the Bellman's map of the Ocean—a blank sheet of paper—the hunting party arrive in a strange land. The Baker recalls that his uncle once warned him that, though catching Snarks is all well and good, you must be careful; for, if your Snark is a Boojum, then you will softly and suddenly vanish away, and never be met with again. With this in mind, they split up to hunt. Along the way, the Butcher and Beaver -previously mutually wary for the Butcher's specialty in preparing beavers- become fast friends, the Barrister falls asleep and dreams of a court trial defended by the Snark, and the Banker loses his sanity after being attacked by a frumious Bandersnatch. At the end, the Baker calls out that he has found a Snark; but when the others arrive he has mysteriously disappeared, 'For the Snark was a Boojum, you see'. Web URL

7  "Phantasmagoria" is a poem written by Lewis Carroll and first published in 1869 as the opening poem of a collection of verse by Carroll entitled Phantasmagoria and Other Poems. It is Lewis Carroll's longest poem. It is a narrative discussion written in seven cantos between a ghost (a Phantom) and a man named Tibbets. Carroll portrays the ghost as not so different from human beings: although ghosts may jibber and jangle their chains, they, like us, simply have a job to do and that job is to haunt. Just as in our society, in ghost society there is a hierarchy, and ghosts are answerable to the King (who must be addressed as “Your Royal Whiteness”) if they disregard the "Maxims of Behaviour”. Web URL

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9  1. Where are the cupboards and bookshelves found?  2. Why does Alice get a thimble?  3. What is the name of the creature sent into the chimney of W. Rabbit's house in order to get Alice out?  4. Upon what does Alice find a caterpillar resting in the forest?  5. Upon arriving at a Duchess' house, Alice is tossed a baby to hold. What does the infant turn into?  6. Who leads Alice on her visit to the Mock-Turtle?

10  1. Aside from the Mad Hatter and the March Hare, who also joins Alice at this mad tea party?  2. True or False. The last part of the Cheshire-Cat that Alice sees is his big, bushy tail.  3. Inside the Duchess's home, Alice discovers the Duchess cradling a baby. Nearby is a cook preparing a soup that apparently contains a bit too much of which condiment?  4. Having escaped her latest growth spurt in the house of W. Rabbit, Alice wonders amongst the grass and flowers. Suddenly, she happens upon a caterpillar with a long hookah. What is this 'hookah'?  5. Alice has discovered, through the help of the caterpillar, that she can eat parts of the mushroom upon which it sits, utilizing this method to adjust her body size. After eating a bit of the mushroom, she finds her neck has elongated to a point where she is above the trees. What sort of creature does a local pigeon mistake Alice for?  6. Soon, Alice finds herself at the residence of a certain local Duchess. She witnesses the exchange of an invitation from the Queen to the Duchess via two footmen. The two footmen have heads shaped like which two animals?

11  1. What does the mouse represent?  2. What is the setting? Time and place.  3. Who is the author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland?  4. What is the point of view for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland?  5. What is Alice?  6. What is the conflict in the story?

12  1. When and where was Lewis Carroll born?  2. Where was he in the order of his sisters and brothers?  3. What did he excel in as a young boy?  4. Where did he go to college?  5. What did he suffer from and who could he talk to easier because of this?  6. When was his two best known stories published?

13  1. What is a quick synopsis of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland? (list the chapters)  2. Who are all of the main characters(20)?  3. What are 5 poems/songs from this story?  4. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has been translated into how many different languages?  5. Name one comic book this story inspired.  6. What kind of live performances did this inspire?

14  1. What is Through the Looking-Glass compared to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland?  2. What’s the white kittens name?  3. What is the black kittens name?  4. Where is Alice placed in the chess game?  5. How is the looking-glass divided into sections?  6. What are 5 of the poems/songs in this story?

15  1. How many of the 13 personal journals didn’t get destroyed completely?  2. What is Lewis Carroll’s real name?  3. What position did he hold from 1856 to 1881?  4. He started using his pseudonym ‘Lewis Carroll’ when?  5. When did he die and where?  6. Where is he, and as well as many of his sisters and brothers, buried?

16  1. What’s the major conflict of the story Through the Looking-Glass?  2. ‘Chess as a metaphor for a deterministic conception of life’, ‘Language as a means to order the world’ and ‘The inescapable loneliness a child feels growing up’ are examples of?  3. What part of the story does Alice becoming a queen represent?  4. What are the two main symbols in the story?  5. How was foreshadowing used?  6. The rising action of the story is?

17  "Biography of Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)." GradeSaver. Web. 20 May 2012..  "Click Here To Play: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland." Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Web. 20 May 2012..  "The Hunting of the Snark." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Web. 20 May 2012..  "Mark Twain Quotations - Jabberwocky." Mark Twain Quotations - Jabberwocky. Web. 20 May 2012..  "Phantasmagoria (poem)." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Web..  "Through the Looking Glass Summary." Study Guides & Essay Editing. Web. 20 May 2012..  "Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland." SparkNotes. SparkNotes. Web. 20 May 2012..  "Click Here To Play: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland II." Alice's Adventures in Wonderland II. Web. 20 May 2012..  "Lewis Carroll." - Biography and Works. Search Texts, Read Online. Discuss. Web. 20 May 2012..  "Lewis Carroll Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television. Web. 20 May 2012..  "Through the Looking-Glass." SparkNotes. SparkNotes. Web. 20 May 2012..  "Through the Looking-Glass." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Web. 20 May 2012..  Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland." Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. Web. 20 May 2012..

18 Slide 9 Slide 10  Where are the cupboards and bookshelves found? › These are found lining the walls as Alice is makes her descent into Wonderland.  Why does Alice get a thimble? › For 'winning' the caucus-race.  What is the name of the creature sent into the chimney of W. Rabbit's house in order to get Alice out? › Bill  Upon what does Alice find a caterpillar resting in the forest? › Mushroom  Upon arriving at a Duchess' house, Alice is tossed a baby to hold. What does the infant turn into? › A pig  Who leads Alice on her visit to the Mock-Turtle? › A gryphon.  Aside from the Mad Hatter and the March Hare, who also joins Alice at this mad tea party? › A dormouse  True or False. The last part of the Cheshire-Cat that Alice sees is his big, bushy tail. › False  Inside the Duchess's home, Alice discovers the Duchess cradling a baby. Nearby is a cook preparing a soup that apparently contains a bit too much of which condiment? › Pepper  Having escaped her latest growth spurt in the house of W. Rabbit, Alice wonders amongst the grass and flowers. Suddenly, she happens upon a caterpillar with a long hookah. What is this 'hookah'? › A pipe  Alice has discovered, through the help of the caterpillar, that she can eat parts of the mushroom upon which it sits, utilizing this method to adjust her body size. After eating a bit of the mushroom, she finds her neck has elongated to a point where she is above the trees. What sort of creature does a local pigeon mistake Alice for? › Serpent.  Soon, Alice finds herself at the residence of a certain local Duchess. She witnesses the exchange of an invitation from the Queen to the Duchess via two footmen. The two footmen have heads shaped like which two animals? › A frog and a fish

19 Slide 11 Slide 12  What does the mouse represent? › Foreshadowing  What is the setting? Time and place. › Victorian era › England, Wonderland  Who is the author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland? › Lewis Carroll  What is the point of view for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland? › The narrator speaks in third person, though occasionally in first and second person.  What is Alice? › Protagonist  What is the conflict in the story? › Alice attempts to come to terms with the puzzle of Wonderland as she undergoes great individual changes while entrenched in Wonderland.  When and where was Lewis Carroll born? › January 27, 1832 in Daresbury, Cheshire, England  Where was he in the order of his sisters and brothers? › The eldest boy in a family of 11 children  What did he excel in as a young boy? › Math  Where did he go to college? › Christ College  What did he suffer from and who could he talk to easier because of this? › A bad stammer  When was his two best known stories pubished? › Alice's Adventures in Wonderland was released in 1865. › Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There (1871)

20 Slide 13 Slide 13 cont.  Who are all of the main characters(20)? › Alice › The White Rabbit › The Mouse › The Dodo › The Lory › The Eaglet › The Duck › Pat › Bill the Lizard › The Caterpillar › The Duchess › The Cheshire Cat › The March Hare › The Hatter › The Dormouse › The Queen of Hearts › The Knave of Hearts › The King of Hearts › The Gryphon › The Mock Turtle  What is a quick synopsis of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland? (list the chapters) › Chapter 1 – Down the Rabbit Hole › Chapter 2 – The Pool of Tears › Chapter 3 – The Caucus Race and a Long Tale › Chapter 4 – The Rabbit Sends a Little Bill › Chapter 5 – Advice from a Caterpillar › Chapter 6 – Pig and Pepper › Chapter 7 – A Mad Tea-Party › Chapter 8 – The Queen's Croquet Ground › Chapter 9 – The Mock Turtle's Story › Chapter 10 – Lobster Quadrille › Chapter 11 – Who Stole the Tarts? › Chapter 12 – Alice's Evidence

21 Slide 13 cont. Slide 14  What are 5 poems/songs from this story? › "All in the golden afternoon..."—the prefatory verse, an original poem by Carroll that recalls the rowing expedition on which he first told the story of Alice's adventures underground › "How Doth the Little Crocodile"—a parody of Isaac Watts' nursery rhyme, "Against Idleness And Mischief" › "The Mouse's Tale"—an example of concrete poetry › "You Are Old, Father William"—a parody of Robert Southey's "The Old Man's Comforts and How He Gained Them"  The Duchess's lullaby, "Speak roughly to your little boy..."—a parody of David Bates' "Speak Gently" › "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Bat"—a parody of Jane Taylor's "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" › "The Lobster Quadrille"—a parody of Mary Botham Howitt's "The Spider and the Fly" › "'Tis the Voice of the Lobster"—a parody of Isaac Watts' "The Sluggard" › "Beautiful Soup"—a parody of James M. Sayles's "Star of the Evening, Beautiful Star" › "The Queen of Hearts"—an actual nursery rhyme › "They told me you had been to her..."—the White Rabbit's evidence  Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has been translated into how many different languages? › 97  Name one comic book this story inspired. › Walt Disney's Alice in Wonderland (Dell Comics, 1951) › Walt Disney's Alice in Wonderland (Gold Key Comics, 1965) › Walt Disney's Alice in Wonderland (Whitman, 1984) › "The Complete Alice in Wonderland" (Dynamite Entertainment, 2005)  What kind of live performances did this inspire? › plays, operas, ballets, and traditional English pantomimes.  What is Through the Looking-Glass compared to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland? › kind of mirror image of Wonderland: the first book begins outdoors, in the warm month of May (4 May), [1] uses frequent changes in size as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of playing cards; the second opens indoors on a snowy, wintry night exactly six months later, on 4 November (the day before Guy Fawkes Night), [2] uses frequent changes in time and spatial directions as a plot device, and draws on the imagery of chess. In it, there are many mirror themes, including opposites, time running backwards, and so on.  What’s the white kittens name? › Snowdrop  What is the black kittens name? › Kitty  Where is Alice placed in the chess game? › in the second rank as one of the White Queen's pawns  How is the looking-glass divided into sections? › by brooks or streams  What are 5 of the poems/songs in this story? › Prelude ("Child of the pure unclouded brow") › "Jabberwocky" (seen in the mirror-house) (Jabberwocky (full poem) including readings) › "Tweedledum and Tweedledee" › "The Lion and the Unicorn" › "The Walrus and the Carpenter" (The Walrus and the Carpenter (full poem)) › "Humpty Dumpty" › "In Winter when the fields are white..." › "Haddocks' Eyes" / The Aged Aged Man / Ways and Means / A-sitting On a Gate, the song is A-sitting On a Gate, but its other names and callings are placed above. › "To the Looking-Glass world it was Alice that said..." › White Queen's riddle › "A boat beneath a sunny sky" is the first line of a titleless acrostic poem at the end of the book—the beginning letters of each line, when put together, spell Alice Pleasance Liddell.

22 Slide 15 Slide 16  How many of the 13 personal journals didn’t get destroyed completely? › 9  What is Lewis Carroll’s real name? › Charles Lutwidge Dodgson  What position did he hold from 1856 to 1881? › Mathematical Lecturer at Oxford  He started using his pseudonym ‘Lewis Carroll’ when? › In 1856  When did he die and where? › on 14 January 1898 at his sisters’ home  Where is he, and as well as many of his sisters and brothers, buried? › at The Mount cemetery in Guildford, Surrey, England  What’s the major conflict of the story Through the Looking-Glass? › Alice attempts to become a Queen in the massive chess game being played in the Looking- Glass World.  ‘Chess as a metaphor for a deterministic conception of life’, ‘Language as a means to order the world’ and ‘The inescapable loneliness a child feels growing up’ are examples of? › Theme  What part of the story does Alice becoming a queen represent? › Climax  What are the two main symbols in the story? › Rushes › The sleeping Red King  How was foreshadowing used? › When Alice’s recitation of the rhymes about Tweedledum and Tweedleedee, Humpty Dumpty, and the Lion and the Unicorn foreshadow each of their fates within the story.  The rising action of the story is? › When Alice, as a pawn, moves forward square by square, meeting many different characters as she advances through the chessboard.


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