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13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties.

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Presentation on theme: "13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties."— Presentation transcript:

1 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

2 Before Studying this chapter, you should already: Have read “How to Use This Book,” pages xxviii-xxxiii, and understand the professional recipe format. Know basic meat and poultry cuts, and be proficient at fabricating them. Be familiar with various spices, and know how to toast and grind whole spices. Be proficient at clarifying stock. Chapter Pre-Requisites 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

3 Before Studying this chapter, you should already: Have read Chapter 11, “Cured and Smoked Foods,” and understand the use of curing mixtures. Have read Chapter 12, “Sausages,” know the various types of pork fat, and be proficient at preparing standard-grind forcemeats. Know how to work with gelatin if you will be preparing pâtés en croûte, or have read ahead to Chapter 16, “Aspic and Chaud-Froid,” pages Chapter Pre-Requisites 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

4 After reading this chapter, you should be able to: List and describe the five basic types of pâté. List and describe the four elements of pâté construction. Identify and safely use the proper equipment for pâté production. Prepare pâté forcemeats. Correctly assemble various types of pâté. Cook pâté products to the proper internal doneness and finish them appropriately according to type. Prepare complementary sauces, condiments, and accompaniments for pâtés. Present finished pâté products for both plated service and platter service. Chapter Objectives 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

5 Pâté A pâté is a forcemeat baked in a pastry crust and usually served cold—this technical, culinary definition is the one generally accepted among chefs and food-service professionals worldwide. However, to the average North American consumer, the definition is much broader, encompassing pâtés with and without crusts as well as spread-like mixtures and cold seafood mousselines. Today, the term pâté can even include loaf like cold vegetable preparations. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

6 Types of Pâtés Today there are five basic types of pâtés: 1.Pâté en croûte : a forcemeat baked in a crust of pastry dough. 2.Terrine : a forcemeat baked in a form or vessel without a pastry crust. 3.Galantine and ballotine : forcemeats wrapped in poultry skin or meat. 4.Pâté roulade (or pâté en roulade): assembled and cooked in the same way as a galantine, but not wrapped in a poultry skin. 5.Mousseline pâté : The smoothest and most refined form of pâté made from an emulsion of puréed raw meat, eggs, and cream. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

7 The Four Elements of Pâté Construction Most pâtés have four basic elements: 1.Forcemeat: All pâtés begin with a forcemeat. This emulsified mixture of ground meat and fat makes up the body of the pâté. 2.Internal garnishes: Pieces of food placed within the forcemeat to add texture, flavor, and visual interest. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

8 The Four Elements of Pâté Construction Most pâtés have four basic elements: 3.Liners and wrappers: A pâté forcemeat is usually contained in some form of wrapper or liner. Only mousselines are not wrapped or lined; they may be encased in a colorful vegetable wrapper for an attractive presentation. 4.Sealers: Historically, after a pâté product was baked and cooled, it was sealed with a semisolid fat to preserve it. Modern pâtés and terrines are now more often sealed with aspic for presentation purposes. Lard, rendered poultry fat, butter, and aspic are used as pâté sealers. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

9 Ingredients Primary meats: Meats that must total more than half the pâté forcemeat’s weight. Secondary meats: Meats added to a pâté forcemeat. They are used for a number of reasons: 1.To add a rich mouthfeel to a forcemeat made from a lean primary meat. Both pork and liver are used for this purpose. 2.To lighten the color of the finished product. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

10 Meats and poultry frequently used in pâté forcemeats: Pork Turkey Pork liver Veal Duck Calf’s liver Game meats Wildfowl Chicken Poultry livers Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

11 Fats for Pâté Forcemeats Fresh pork fat Chicken fat and turkey fat Duck fat Seasonings for Pâté Forcemeats Salt, spices, herbs, aromatic vegetables, meat glazes, alcoholic beverages, nitrite curing mix. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

12 Secondary Binders and Extenders for Pâté Forcemeats Many forcemeats acquire a better texture with a secondary binding element in addition to the primary bind created by the emulsion of fat and meat. These secondary binders consist of protein ingredients and starch ingredients. The starch binders also function as extenders, adding low-cost bulk to the force meat mix. Secondary binders used in pâté forcemeats include: Raw egg Flour Panade (or Panada) Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

13 Ingredients for Pâté Internal Garnishes Cured and smoked meats Nuts Dried fruits and vegetables Truffles Marinated raw meats and poultry Seasoned livers Gratin garnishes: Raw meats and poultry or livers that are seared to add both flavor and an attractive brown color to the finished pâté product. Internal garnishes are applied to pâtés in two ways: 1.Random garnishes 2.Inlay Garnishes Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

14 Wrappings and Linings for Pâtés Pâte à pâté : Pastry dough wrappers for pâtés en croûte –The French translation for this terms is “pastry for pâté.” –These doughs must be sturdy enough to hold up to heavy forcemeats and the steam, juices, and rendered fat they produce. –Dough choices include: Pâte brisée, made with lard or vegetable shortening. A milk-enriched biscuit-type dough. A lightly yeasted, lard-enriched bread dough. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

15 Wrappings and Linings for Pâtés Liners for terrines –Fresh pork fatback Fatback used for lining terrines must be fabricated into long, wide, even slices, 1⁄8-in. (0.3-cm) thick, to line the terrine mold thoroughly and efficiently. –Caul fat (also called lace fat) A thin yet remarkably strong membrane that encases the stomach and intestines of hogs and other animals. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

16 Wrappings and Linings for Pâtés Liners for terrines –Bacon or pancetta is the usual liner choice of amateur cooks as both are widely available in pre-sliced form. –However, the assertive taste of these products can overwhelm the flavor of a delicate forcemeat. –They are best teamed with bold, rustic forcemeats, particularly those that include liver. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Danish liver pâté with bacon Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

17 Wrappings and Linings for Pâtés Liners for terrines –Vegetables, such as sturdy lettuce leaves, mild-flavored cabbage, kale, and blanched leeks, may be used as liners for modern poached or steamed terrines. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Provençal Terrine of Rabbit Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

18 Sealer Ingredients for Pâtés Aspic Sealer for Pâtés en Croûte –For pâtés en croûte, modern charcutiers use flavorful, crystal-clear aspic to fill the gap and adhere the crust to the forcemeat. –Lard is the traditional material used to seal terrines for extended storage. Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

19 Equipment for Grinding and Puréeing Pâté forcemeats are prepared in the same manner as sausage forcemeats. Therefore, the same equipment is used for grinding and puréeing both. Pâté and Terrine Forms Today’s charcutiers can choose from a variety of vessels in which to bake both pâtés en croûte and terrines. Equipment for Pâté Production 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved From top to bottom: Stainless-steel triangle form, enameled cast-iron terrine, porcelain terrine, stainless-steel collapsible pâté en croûte form Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

20 Because both sausages and pâtés begin with forcemeats, the initial preparation of pâtés is the same as sausages. Information on the preparation of forcemeats can be found in Chapter 12, pages Preparing Pâtés and Terrines 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

21 Galantine or Ballotine? Galantine –Most food historians believe the culinary term galantine is derived from the archaic French word galine, meaning “chicken,” and is related to the modern Spanish word for chicken, gallina. –If this is the true linguistic root of the term, it is safe to assume that a galantine should be made from a chicken, or from a kind of fowl. Ballotine –The term ballotine is also frequently used to describe a poultry forcemeat cooked in a poultry skin. –However, this term is derived from the French ballot, or “bundle,” and so is more generic than galantine. Thus, it can refer to any kind of wrapped forcemeat. Galantines, Ballotines and Pâté Roulades 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

22 Galantine or Ballotine? Both galantines and ballotines consist of forcemeats wrapped in skin or meat prior to cooking. Pâté roulades are modern interpretations of galantines and ballotines. The poultry skin is replaced by a decorative liner, and the lined forcemeat is wrapped in heavy- duty plastic film before it is poached. Galantines, Ballotines and Pâté Roulades 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

23 Storage Most pâté products, once sealed as in the preceding procedures, have a relatively long refrigerated shelf life. A terrine untouched in its dish keeps in the refrigerator for a month, while an uncut, aspic-sealed pâté en croûte lasts at least two weeks. Once a pâté product is cut open, it must be served within a few days. Although you can freeze uncooked pâté forcemeat and even freeze an uncooked, assembled terrine, you cannot successfully freeze a cooked pâté. Storing and Presenting Pâtés 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

24 Presentation Styles Pâtés, terrines, and galantines may be: –presented on a platter for buffet service. –individually portioned for plate service. Platter Presentation –A well-crafted pâté en croûte, terrine, galantine, or roulade is often the centerpiece of a garde manger display. Storing and Presenting Pâtés 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved pâté en croûte Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

25 Presentation Styles Plate Presentation –Plated presentation can range from simple and rustic to elaborate and formal. –In simple, traditional presentations, one or two slices of pâté are plated with a liner leaf or herb sprig garnish, a condiment, and perhaps a simple or composed salad accompaniment. Storing and Presenting Pâtés 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Provençal Terrine of Rabbit with Beet Salad Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

26 Presentation Styles En Terrine Presentation –For casual service, a terrine may be served in the same dish in which it was baked, a service style called en terrine presentation. Storing and Presenting Pâtés 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Country terrine presented in an enameled cast-iron terrine dish Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties

27 Pâté Accompaniments Good bread is the essential accompaniment for pâtés. Ideas for pâté accompaniments. –Flavored mustards –Cumberland sauce –Anglo-Indian chutneys –Mayonnaise sauces –Relishes –Fruit or vegetable salsas –Reduced vinegar glazes –Pickled vegetables –Vegetables dressed in vinaigrette Storing and Presenting Pâtés 13 Chapter Copyright © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved Pâtés, Terrines, and Charcuterie Specialties


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