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© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 31: Garde-Manger.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 31: Garde-Manger."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 31: Garde-Manger The garde-manger chef prepares a variety of pâtés, forcemeats, appetizers, salads, and cold foods

2 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

3 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Garde-Manger Has Several Meanings “Keep to eat” Referred to as a storage area, pantry A place to cure meats An area of specialized foods Cold kitchen Responsible for all the decorative aspects of cold food presentation

4 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Forcemeats An emulsion of fat and lean meat is basic component of a garde-manger preparation Basis of pâté is used for Galantines, terrines, roulades, sausages, quenelles

5 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Preparation Guidelines All equipment clean and well chilled All ingredients at the right temperature (40˚F/4˚C) Foods mixed over an ice bath Area clean A true emulsion must be kept quite cold Stop and rechill any food that seems too warm

6 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Grinding Foods Chilled grinder head and blades Cut foods into strips or dices, chill Let foods fall naturally through grinder, do not push Blades must be sharp Go progressively from large to small die Use a processor to finish

7 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Panada (Binders, Extenders) Usually are no more than 20 percent of the weight of the forcemeat Several types Bread, cubes soaked in milk Flour, like a roux, add to milk, heavy béchamel Potato panada Pâté á choux panada

8 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Aspic Gelée Highly gelatinous, clarified stock Used to coat foods Gives moisture, strong meat flavor Can be clear, gold, brown Should have good mouth meltaway qualities Gives cold food presentation a great and lasting freshness

9 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Pâté Dough Strong dough to hold or encase a baking forcemeat Can be made like pie dough Made from herbed flours or vegetable flours Can be decoratively molded

10 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Straight Forcemeat A basic forcemeat is the foundation for sausages, pâtés, terrines, and gallantines Must have chilled equipment (grinder and parts) Holding containers Processor and/or mixer

11 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Ingredients Dominant meat Pork fat, cut and chilled Binders (optional) Pork butt ( correct fat to lean) Seasoning and salt Garnishes Finishing ingredients (aspic)

12 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Preparation All ingredients ready and chilled Add seasonings before grinding Large die first When ground, blend in a processor Add balance of seasonings Add panada, if called for Test it by cooking a small amount Fold in the garnish Forcemeat is ready

13 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Evaluating for Quality Taste a small cooked portion Dominant meat should be main flavor Balance of flavors and ingredients should be enhancing Mix should be palatable Should retain shape after slicing No gristle or sinew

14 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Testing a Forcemeat Cooked by making a patty and sautéing it, or poaching it like a quenelle Place a small amount into a bag and poach it in simmering water Chill it then eat it Correct the seasoning in the body of the mix and test it again

15 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Country-Style Forcemeat Coarser then straight method Usually made from pork, pork fat, and a percentage of liver Grind meat through big die Grind half the meat and liver again Combine both halves together and mix the balance of ingredients

16 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Gratin of Forcemeat Some portion of the meat is sautéed or browned Forcemeat method is standard All products must be cooled for assembly Browned meat looses some binding power Secondary binder may be necessary

17 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Mousseline A forcemeat with a very light texture Typically made from fish and poultry Cream, eggs add a characteristic lightness Procedure is the same Ice bath, diced meat/fish Binder Chilled equipment

18 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Assembly A processor will help make a smooth consistency While processing, cream is drizzled in at the end Very fast process, cream can separate, and meat can cook Have everything ready

19 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Terrines Derive their name from the dish they are baked in Line the mold with sliced pork fat Leave a 2-inch overhang on the outside Add the forcemeat, pressing down Fold the fat over Cover, place in a bain-marie Bake to a safe internal temperature Chill before slicing Add aspic gelée and serve right from the terrine

20 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Galantines and Roulades Derives from the French word galin, meaning “chicken” Exclusively made from poultry years ago Now, anything can be used in a roulade or galantine Galantines are usually wrapped in the skin of the dominant product, or cheesecloth or clear wrap, and poached

21 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Construction Skin the product, leaving skin intact, and remove the flesh from the bones; chill meat Make a forcemeat and add any garnish Lay out the skin, spread the forcemeat evenly (pastry bag is great) Roll into a tight cylinder, wrap with cheesecloth, clear wrap, foil, or caul fat, or a combination Poach at 170˚F, until done, submerged on a rack Cool in the stock, rewrap and chill, hold until you need it

22 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Pâté en Croûte Choose the hinged pan and break it apart Spray with an aerosol lubricant (Canola) Prepare a forcemeat Prepare a dough, and cut the dough to line each end, the bottom and sides, and the top (four pieces) Do not stretch, but roll it out evenly Line the mold

23 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Pâté en Croûte (continued) Wash the seams, then line the pastry with sheets of sliced pork fat Using a pastry bag, fill the mold (alternate layers of garnish) Put the top crust on with a wash Cut vent holes, make a chimney with foil for the holes Make a collar with the remaining dough, and line the hole. Bake as directed, fill the mold with aspic, chill and slice

24 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Curing Salmon Two methods, dry or wet Leave skin on as it will be easier to slice Remove pin bones and belly fat Bury in salt with herbs and spices in a perforated hotel pan and weight another pan on top For a wet brine, combine the flavorings with water, place the trimmed salmon into it and let it soak for the recommended time (chilled) Usually, salmon will need to be refreshed in cool running water for about 15 minutes, dried, then sliced thinly


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