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RESEARCH POSTER PRESENTATION DESIGN © 2012 www.PosterPresentations.com (—THIS SIDEBAR DOES NOT PRINT—) DESIGN GUIDE This PowerPoint 2007 template produces.

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Presentation on theme: "RESEARCH POSTER PRESENTATION DESIGN © 2012 www.PosterPresentations.com (—THIS SIDEBAR DOES NOT PRINT—) DESIGN GUIDE This PowerPoint 2007 template produces."— Presentation transcript:

1 RESEARCH POSTER PRESENTATION DESIGN © 2012 www.PosterPresentations.com (—THIS SIDEBAR DOES NOT PRINT—) DESIGN GUIDE This PowerPoint 2007 template produces a 36”x48” presentation poster. You can use it to create your research poster and save valuable time placing titles, subtitles, text, and graphics. We provide a series of online tutorials that will guide you through the poster design process and answer your poster production questions. To view our template tutorials, go online to PosterPresentations.com and click on HELP DESK. When you are ready to print your poster, go online to PosterPresentations.com Need assistance? Call us at 1.510.649.3001 QUICK START Zoom in and out As you work on your poster zoom in and out to the level that is more comfortable to you. Go to VIEW > ZOOM. Title, Authors, and Affiliations Start designing your poster by adding the title, the names of the authors, and the affiliated institutions. You can type or paste text into the provided boxes. The template will automatically adjust the size of your text to fit the title box. You can manually override this feature and change the size of your text. TIP: The font size of your title should be bigger than your name(s) and institution name(s). Adding Logos / Seals Most often, logos are added on each side of the title. You can insert a logo by dragging and dropping it from your desktop, copy and paste or by going to INSERT > PICTURES. Logos taken from web sites are likely to be low quality when printed. Zoom it at 100% to see what the logo will look like on the final poster and make any necessary adjustments. TIP: See if your school’s logo is available on our free poster templates page. Photographs / Graphics You can add images by dragging and dropping from your desktop, copy and paste, or by going to INSERT > PICTURES. Resize images proportionally by holding down the SHIFT key and dragging one of the corner handles. For a professional-looking poster, do not distort your images by enlarging them disproportionally. Image Quality Check Zoom in and look at your images at 100% magnification. If they look good they will print well. ORIGINAL DISTORTED Corner handles Good printing quality Bad printing quality QUICK START (cont.) How to change the template color theme You can easily change the color theme of your poster by going to the DESIGN menu, click on COLORS, and choose the color theme of your choice. You can also create your own color theme. You can also manually change the color of your background by going to VIEW > SLIDE MASTER. After you finish working on the master be sure to go to VIEW > NORMAL to continue working on your poster. How to add Text The template comes with a number of pre- formatted placeholders for headers and text blocks. You can add more blocks by copying and pasting the existing ones or by adding a text box from the HOME menu. Text size Adjust the size of your text based on how much content you have to present. The default template text offers a good starting point. Follow the conference requirements. How to add Tables To add a table from scratch go to the INSERT menu and click on TABLE. A drop-down box will help you select rows and columns. You can also copy and a paste a table from Word or another PowerPoint document. A pasted table may need to be re-formatted by RIGHT-CLICK > FORMAT SHAPE, TEXT BOX, Margins. Graphs / Charts You can simply copy and paste charts and graphs from Excel or Word. Some reformatting may be required depending on how the original document has been created. How to change the column configuration RIGHT-CLICK on the poster background and select LAYOUT to see the column options available for this template. The poster columns can also be customized on the Master. VIEW > MASTER. How to remove the info bars If you are working in PowerPoint for Windows and have finished your poster, save as PDF and the bars will not be included. You can also delete them by going to VIEW > MASTER. On the Mac adjust the Page-Setup to match the Page-Setup in PowerPoint before you create a PDF. You can also delete them from the Slide Master. Save your work Save your template as a PowerPoint document. For printing, save as PowerPoint of “Print-quality” PDF. Print your poster When you are ready to have your poster printed go online to PosterPresentations.com and click on the “Order Your Poster” button. Choose the poster type the best suits your needs and submit your order. If you submit a PowerPoint document you will be receiving a PDF proof for your approval prior to printing. If your order is placed and paid for before noon, Pacific, Monday through Friday, your order will ship out that same day. Next day, Second day, Third day, and Free Ground services are offered. Go to PosterPresentations.com for more information. Student discounts are available on our Facebook page. Go to PosterPresentations.com and click on the FB icon. © 2013 PosterPresentations.com 2117 Fourth Street, Unit C Berkeley CA 94710 posterpresenter@gmail.com This study asked what the overall perception is that professional counselors have towards the African American clergy providing mental health counseling in the community. Do the professional counselors believe that the clergy is adequately prepared (trained) to counsel those to whom they minister? The researcher looked directly at the role of pastoral counseling to determine whether boundaries should be set between the pastor and the counselor as it relates to this counseling specialization. Simmonds (2006) noted that for years a void has existed amid professional counselors and the clergy. A conflict that transcends the lines of religion and counseling, where counselors often regarding individuals who hold any spiritual belief as deluded, and clergy viewing counseling as overly focused on scientific research and secular psychodynamic approaches that fall outside of Christian values (Bledsoe, Setterlund, Connolly & Adams, 2011). INTRODUCTION OBJECTIVES As researchers, we should note that there is no such thing as a phenomenological method; it is more of an orientation than a specific approach (Compton, 2009; Orleans, 2007). Phenomenological research is considered a dynamic process in which strict methods would be a contradiction to the phenomenological philosophy (Parker, 1994). This concept is shared by Donalek (1994) and Colaizzi (1978) who postulate that phenomenology can be conducted in many different ways, as well as Taylor and Bogdan (1984), noting that researchers create their own ways of analyzing data. In light of this philosophy, the researcher drew on three methodologies - Moustakas (1994), Giorgi (1985), and Morrissette (1999) to examine the data and uncover the essential structures of the phenomenon in question. Wilson and Hutchinson (1991), who advocated the concept now known as pluralism, first used this blending of approaches. The argument of mixing methods is that not to mix raises the questions about whether researchers are accessing all that is available to them in the data. Using a mixture of methods enables greater understanding of the impact of methodological structure and presentation expectations are illuminated (Frost, et al, 2010). Woodard (2004), who developed the Woodard’s theory, which emphasizes individual differences naturally occurring in the lived experiences of everyday life (Woodard, 2004), would further this concept. Internal of this research, the researcher developed the Jackson model of data analysis, employing the blended work of Moustakas (1994), Morrissette (1999), and Giorgi and Giorgi (2003). Since there is no hard and fast rule that one cannot take aspects of one methodology and join them with aspects of another methodology to fit the phenomena and the researcher’s situation, you will note that certain elements of each of the methods has been suspended in favor of other methodologies that would address elements of the lived experiences of the participants in a manner that will allow for a more engaged account (Woodard, 2004). METHODS RESULTS From the study results, the researcher was able to conclude that licensed professional counselors have a clear understanding of the roles of the pastoral counselor, realizing that the role the pastor plays in the lives of the church members is pivotal in the community. The participants commented that the pastor is more likely to understand the social and cultural factors influencing the members and therefore the pastor can reach individuals and families who look more to their religious based community for guidance during difficult times. In doing so, the study resulted in finding several emerging themes. The major themes found during this study were counseling, community, professionalism, and training. Subordinate themes that emerged from the study included spiritual, faith, licensure, and the need for a degree related to counseling. Finally the study concluded that the licensed professional counselor wants to learn more about the role of the pastor, opening the ability for referrals, providing a better community health stance, and training to provide the pastor with not only being able to recognize when and why referrals to highly skilled counselors is necessary, but also how to do so without creating unnecessary stress in the process of transferring the member to an outside counselor. CONCLUSIONS In closing, a gap remains in the literature on the overall perception of the licensed professional counselor towards African American clergy and the use of pastoral counseling in the community. This study sought to provide data on the lived experiences of licensed professional counselors and how their experiences might have skewed their conduct towards African American pastors providing pastoral counseling in the community today. It is clear that very little attention has been given to the perceptions of either the pastor or the clergy, outside of preliminary investigations (Aten, Topping, Denney, & Hosey, 2011). Employment of the suggestions could expand the current level of research data, which would close the void in literature, adding to the body of knowledge in reference to perceptions amongst licensed professional counselors, and start to bridge the divide that exists in the lack of collaboration between the church and the counselor. What are the perceptions that licensed professional counselors working in the Mid Atlantic United States have towards pastors providing pastoral counseling in the African American church? Build a stronger association between counselors towards the concept of pastoral counseling. Bridging the differences and bringing both professions to the center point of the two axis, future counselors will have a greater understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of both professions. Understand the concept surrounding pastoral counseling in the African American church. Provide a benefit to the community by understanding of the perceptions held by the LPC concerning the function of pastoral counseling. Open a dialogue between the LPC and the Pastoral Counselor to enlighten both sides on their need in the community and how to work towards the common goals of helping others. Capella University – Harold Abel School of Social and Behavioral Sciences Brian K. Jackson, PhD LPC’s PERCEPTIONS OF PASTORAL COUNSELING REFERENCES Aten, J. D., Topping, S., Denney, R. M., & Hosey, J. M. (2011). Helping African American clergy and churches address minority disaster mental health disparities: Training needs, model, and example. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 3, 15-23. Bledsoe, S., Setterlund, K., Connolly, M., & Adams, C. (2011, October). Promoting emotional well-being among Southern California parishioners through clergy/mental health practitioner collaboration. NACSW Convention 2011, Pittsburgh, PA. Colaizzi, P. F. (1978). Psychological research as the phenomenologist views it. In R. S. Valle, & M. King (Eds.), Existential phenomenological alternative for psychology (pp. 48-71). New York: Plenum. Compton, B.W. (2009). The domain shared by computational and digital ontology: A phenomenological exploration and analysis (Doctoral dissertation). Available from ProQuest Dissertation & Theses (PQDT) database. (3385243) Donalek, J. G. (1994). Phenomenology as a philosophy and method. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 174. Frost, N., Nolas, S., Brooks-Gordon, B., Esin, C., Holt, A., Mehdizadeh, L., & Shinebourne, P. (2010). Pluralism in qualitative research: the impact of different researchers and qualitative approaches on the analysis of qualitative data. Qualitative Research, 441-460. Giorgi, A. (1985). Phenomenology and psychological research. Pittsburg, PA: Duquesne University Press. Giorgi, A., & Giorgi, B. (2003). Qualitative research in psychology: Expanding perspective in methodology and design. P. M. Camic, J. E. Rhodes, & L. Yardley (Eds.). Washington: American Psychological Association. Morrissette, P. J. (1999). Phenomenological data analysis: A proposed model for counselors. Guidance and Counseling, 15(1), 2-7. Moustakas, C. (1994). Phenomenological research methods. London: Sage. Orleans, M. (2007). Encyclopedia of Sociology. In G. Ritzer, The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology (pp. 4334-4378). New York: Wiley-Blackwell. Parker, I. (1994). Qualitative research. In P. Banister, E. Burman, I. Parker, M. Taylor, C. Tindall (Eds.) Qualitative methods in psychology: A research guide (pp. 1-16). Maidenhead, Berkshire, UK. Open University Press. Taylor, S. J., & Bogdan, R. (1984). Introduction to qualitative research methods: The search for meanings. New York: John Wiley & Sons. Wilson, H., & Hutchinson, S. (1991). Triangulation of qualitative methods: Heideggerian hermeneutics and grounded theory. Qualitative Health Research, 1, 263-276. Woodard, Fredrick, J. (2004) A phenomenological and perceptual research methodology for understanding hypnotic experiencing. Psychological Reports, 95, 887-904.


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