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Miley, an avid Harry Potter fan, asks one of her teachers before she boards the bus for her 2011 high school graduation ceremony. She had already received.

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Presentation on theme: "Miley, an avid Harry Potter fan, asks one of her teachers before she boards the bus for her 2011 high school graduation ceremony. She had already received."— Presentation transcript:

1 Miley, an avid Harry Potter fan, asks one of her teachers before she boards the bus for her 2011 high school graduation ceremony. She had already received several warnings about wearing the cape to school, as it broke the district’s student dress code no costumes rule.

2 Amy explains to those that pass by her that her flower vase and checkerboard picnic tablecloth were they to stay. She continued setting up her picnic every day after school during the second semester of her junior year.

3 Natasia describes the night the she came home from the hospital after receiving 12 stitches in her head. He foster brother came home mad, threw a hammer across the room and cracked open her skull.

4 Monica, the leader of the Japanese Culture Club, talks about her club’s annual tea party. While a couple of the club’s members come wearing kimonos with their converse, many just opt to wear their blue jeans and T- shirts for the event.

5 FEATURE WRITING

6  A feature story is a journalistic article that tends to take a narrative approach, using opening paragraphs to establish a scene and hook the reader.

7  A feature story shares a lot of the characteristics of short fiction writing (plot, character, setting, conflict, theme) but it requires that all the elements be 100 percent factual.

8  A feature story is about people or groups of people  A feature story has a theme or a specific topic  A feature story can show a “slice of someone’s life,” be about a dramatic situation, give information to accompany a main news story, dig deep and investigate a topic, explain the background situation for a news event, enlighten readers on universal topics through the perspective of those “in the know”

9 FEATURE WRITING

10

11  Powerful lead  Show the face (character) of the story  Open with the specific, full of details and description to flesh out the setting of the story  Set the tone of the story by hinting at the plot and upcoming conflict

12 The girl in the window, Lane DeGregory, Times Staff Writer, Posted: Jul 31, :35 PM The girl in the window, Lane DeGregory, Times Staff Writer, Posted: Jul 31, :35 PM

13 Diving headlong into a sunny paradise, By Lane DeGregory, Times Staff Writer, In Print: Monday, May 30, 2011 Diving headlong into a sunny paradise, By Lane DeGregory, Times Staff Writer, In Print: Monday, May 30, 2011

14 Largo park keeper says goodbye to his escaped owl friend By Lane DeGregory, In Print: Monday, February 14, 2011 Largo park keeper says goodbye to his escaped owl friend By Lane DeGregory, In Print: Monday, February 14, 2011

15 The young Egyptian professional could pass for any New York bachelor. Dressed in a crisp polo shirt and swathed in cologne, he races his Nissan Maxima through the rain- slicked streets of Manhattan, late for a date with a tall brunette. At red lights, he fusses with his hair. What sets the bachelor apart from other young men on the make is the chaperon sitting next to him -- a tall, bearded man in a white robe and stiff embroidered hat. The imam of a Bay Ridge mosque, Mr. Shata, serves as a chaperone to some 550 "marriage candidates.” The meetings often unfold on the green velour couch of his office, or over a meal at his favorite Yemeni restaurant on Atlantic Avenue. Tending to Muslim Hearts and Islam's Future By: Andrea Elliott March 7, 2006

16 FEATURE WRITING

17  Nut graph  Usually one sentence, but may be two to three  Goes from the very narrow focused lead to a more broad theme statement  Works like a news story lead to provide a summary  Writer may use critical thinking to provide the summary. *If attribution of facts is not in the nut graph (which is okay but may make the graph feel like it has been editorialized), then evidence supporting the conclusion drawn in the nut graph must be attributed as the story continues

18  Nut graph  Provides a justification of why the reader should care and why the story is important  May provide a news peg and a future date– a newsworthy event that justifies the writing of the feature story and explains why the story is timely. (If news peg is not in the nut graph and there is one available, it should be placed within 2-4 paragraphs after the nut graph).

19 To Young To Diet? By Christopher Scanlan Knight Ridder Newspapers Feb. 19, 1994 To Young To Diet? By Christopher Scanlan Knight Ridder Newspapers Feb. 19, 1994

20 UIL Wrap Up Slideshow Presentation by Jeanne Acton LEAD Some people say they would give the shirt off their back to help people in need. Junior Salvador Sanchez gave the roof over his head. NUT GRAPH In February, Salvador convinced his parents to sell their 4,500-square-foot home and move into a smaller, less expensive home in a nearby neighborhood. Then he convinced them to donate the profit from the sale, about $175,000, to two local charities, the Capital Area Food Bank and The Bridge Project. DIRECT QUOTE “We are a very blessed family,” Salvador said. “We live a life of ease. We have food on our table every night. We buy the things we want — big screen televisions, video games, nice clothes, nice cars, etc. But our world, our community, is not as blessed.” --CON’T

21 UIL Wrap Up Slideshow Presentation by Jeanne Acton TRANSITION/NEWS PEG Salvador and his family will be honored by the City Council on Tuesday. At that meeting, the council will issue a challenge to the community to match the family’s donation by June 1. People can donate directly to either charity or through leaguetownhall.org.

22 FEATURE WRITING

23  The body  For beginners, use basic chronology  Lead with a dramatic moment ▪ Use nut graph to reveal theme and to flash back to where the story needs to start  Follow a typical plot sequence: beginning, middle, end ▪ Exposition (setting/characters/situation)—*Nut Graph*-- Conflict/Rising Action– Climax—Falling Action— Resolution

24  Other writing devices for the more advanced  Story within a story  Side story  Foreshadowing  Flashback  Plot twist  Incluing or infodumping background information  Non linear story telling Note: Story may be broken into several sections, like plays are broken into acts, movies into scenes and books into chapters

25 For troubled student, a sport and a coach provide a chance for a big reversal By Bill Stevens, Times Staff Writer  Section 1a- Intro to a troubled Ladarious Jackson and a man on a drop out mission/wrestling coach Travis DeWalt  Section 1b- Glimpse at the start of Ladrious’ troubles. He was a crack baby  Section 2- Ladarious’ struggles with family, places to live, and the law up through middle school. Also, hint a wrestling past (watched it with his brother on TV)  Section 3- Struggles and triumphs while working on HS wrestling team. Last graph ends with Ladarious homeless again. --CONTINUED

26 For troubled student, a sport and a coach provide a chance for a big reversal By Bill Stevens, Times Staff Writer  Section 4- Personal trials and triumphs while trying to continue his high school education. Wrestling wins, school award, joining ROTC yet personal struggles like learning disability, no transportation  Section 5- More personal triumphs– positive, upbeat look at who Ladarious was as a senior  Section 6- Ladarious graduating.

27  The body  Quotes ▪ Connects to and elaborates on the transition/nut graph, without repeating what was previously said ▪ Shows the emotions of the story ▪ Format first time source is used: “Blah blah blah,” attribution first name last name said. “blah blah blah.” ▪ Format second time source is used: “Blah blah blah,” last name said. “blah blah blah.”

28  The body  Transitions ▪ Provides important facts that are verifiable, factual ▪ Uses transitional words to help story flow ▪ Fact, indirect quotes or partial quotes may be used

29 Lead: Uses a descriptive story to introduce a character, setting and/or conflict and develop an angle. Hooks the reader before related to a more general topic. Nut graph: Provides a summary of a more general topic/theme. Provides the news worthy reason for the feature. Answers who, what, where, when, how and why. Direct quote: Helps reader move from the nut graph to the next fact. The first quote usually comes for the primary source and always shows emotion. Transition: Using facts, transitions help keep the story flowing. They either provide description or facts. Make sure to attribute facts. Direct quote: Helps reader move from the previous transitional fact to the next. The quotes can come for the primary or secondary sources. Only quote emotion. Transition: Using facts, transitions help keep the story flowing. Transitions may be indirect or partial quotes Direct quote: Helps reader move from the previous transitional fact to the next. The quotes can come for the primary or secondary sources. Only quote emotion. Linked And so on until the conclusion Conclusion: Helps resolve the issues for the reader and bring closure for the main character. May circle back to the lead. Comes in the form of a direct quote that is an emotional statement that readers will remember.

30 By Jessie Garcia. McKinney North High School Reflections yearbook Tops In Texas Personality Profile. At her father’s side, on his last night, Angie Ng (10) took all the time available she had with him. She knew this was it, the last few minutes with any parent, having her mom pass away in a March 2009 car accident. I could not believe it; it was unreal, even at the funeral,” Ng said. “I guess you could say I was in denial about it all.” Only a mere four months after her mom’s passing, Angie Ng took on an adult role, taking care of her terminally ill father who was suffering from colon cancer. “I would try and cook dinner every night, I had to give him his right medication,” Ng said. “Sometimes I had to help him walk around, as he would fall, and I would have to catch him.” With the help of nurses each day, Ng stayed by her dad’s side. “I do not know what it was, but it is like I always knew he needed me, before he even said anything,” Ng said. “If I had a feeling he was up, then I would go check, and he was up.” After her dad passed away, Ng turned to friends for support and to fill the time. “I don’t want people worrying about me, but some days are hard, especially when I am at home versus when I am at school having all these distractions,” Ng said. “I would have never gotten through this without my friends; they are my biggest support system. I mean they’re all I have left,” Ng said. --CONTINUED

31 By Jessie Garcia. McKinney North High School Reflections yearbook Tops In Texas Personality Profile. Choir was another haven for Ng. Steven Nelms (f) and Angie became close, starting during the summer. “Angie would come to my office and we would just talk,” Nelms said. “Sometimes her biology teacher was kind enough to notify her when they would be discussing genetics. If she wanted to come to the choir hall to read the chapter she could, so she wouldn’t have to hear the discussion.” With her support system built around school faculty and friends, Ng was thrown off course when she discovered that she had to move in with her aunt and go to a private school. “There were like only thirteen kids in my grade,” Ng said. “I literally started bawling when I found that out.” But, as her life unraveled before her, Angie caught a break when her best friend’s parents offered her a place in their home. “The Schuliens are the greatest people ever,” Ng said. “I try to do as much as I can for them, as they have already done so much for me. Even through I have lost everything, I still feel so blessed, because I know it could be so much worse.”

32 FEATURE WRITING

33  The conclusion should  Remind the reader of the article’s purpose  Be a thought provoking, emotional quote  Be impactful, may encourage a change of opinion  Circle back to the lead and finish off the anecdote or imagery that was started in the lead  Give closure for the reader in regards to the main character of the story

34 For sick kids, ConKerr Cancer pillowcase project creates a pillow to cry on, or dream on By Lane DeGregory In Print: December 29, 2010 LEAD Chela Duran was propped up in her hospital bed last week, her left hand tethered to an IV, when a woman wearing reindeer antlers popped through the door. "I brought you something," said Kelly Barmore, a child life therapist at All Children's Hospital. Her antlers wiggled while she walked. "These are pillowcases," she said, setting a stack of brightly patterned fabrics on the bed. "See? We've got lots of different ones: cowgirl, Tinkerbell, Santa." She flipped through the pile. "And it's not just for while you're here. You can take it with you when you go home." The girl looked up. "Can I go home now? 'Cause tomorrow is my birthday." She would be 7. "Well, then you need this one," said the therapist, pulling out a case covered with colored balloons. "The magic birthday pillowcase."

35 For sick kids, ConKerr Cancer pillowcase project creates a pillow to cry on, or dream on By Lane DeGregory In Print: December 29, 2010 CONCLUSION The next afternoon, doctors discharged Chela. She had missed her town's Christmas parade, missed her first grade holiday party, missed birthday cupcakes with her classmates. Her parents promised she could still celebrate. But before they left for Chuck E. Cheese that night, Chela had a request. In her bedroom at home, she pulled out the handmade case printed with the colored balloons. She asked her mom to put it on her real pillow. Maybe it still had some magic.

36 FEATURE WRITING

37  Covered the topic or event rather than used topics, like the activities of clubs, to point to a interesting story about someone involved, but remember the story should be a narrow theme/ perspective about a person or a group of people  Topic: Relay for Life  Feature Story: Student that is participating in the Relay for Life for personal reasons– own survival of cancer, caring for a relative with cancer, working as a volunteer in the cancer wing of a hospital

38 BAD  On Friday night club members and athletes, including John Filbeck, will be walking for a cause during Relay for life. Filbeck, once the starting quarterback for the Panthers, has a special reason to be there. He just survived four rounds of chemo to fight his cancer. GOOD  John Filbeck was more afraid of never playing football again than he was of cancer. A 13-year-old has his own priorities. *excerpt taken from p. 49 of The Radical Wright by Bobby Hawthorne

39  Used friends instead of finding the right people to interview (Main: A person with a compelling story that is closest to the theme/topic, Secondary: The main interviewee’s closest support system and the experts on the topic)  Failed to research the topic and have background knowledge of theme and of the main subject before the interview. Asked, “What can you tell me about.”  Asked stupid/background questions like “What is the purpose of FFA?”  Relied on close ended questions rather than on open ended questions. Key words: Describe it, how did it look, what happened next, how would others there describe it, can you tell me more,  Stuck to pre-formulated questions rather than asking follow-up questions.  Tried to prove someone wrong instead of going in with an open mind  Talked the whole time rather than giving the subject wait time  Failed to bring paper, pen, tape recorder to take quality notes or took notes but then took weeks before going through them

40 BAD  Killing animals is such a bad thing. What is your opinion?  Do you plan on being a judge next year?  Will the rules be the same next year? GOOD  How do you feel about how the current rules are being enforced?  Why did you stop eating meat?  How do you plan to carry the base line with only one tuba player?  Can you tell me more about what happened when the principal walked in the room?

41  Didn’t choose a theme. Should have evaluated all the possible stories themes/angles to be told and then selected the most compelling one  Used a broad topic and tried to cover the whole topic. A feature isn’t a person’s bio or a research report that has to include all the information about a person. Only information that tells a story relevant to the topic should be used  Let the subject give an angle but was so focused on one direction that you didn’t get any quotes about it. So, don’t be afraid to re-interview

42 BAD The dance club held it’s monthly meeting in room B109 on Tuesday. During the meeting the members decided on a car was fund raiser for the first semester of the school year and then a banquet for the end of the year. “I know we are going to be really busy,” club president Chelsea McGuire said. After the business part of the meeting, members had cake and cookies. “Madeline’s mom makes the best pineapple cake ever,” McGuire said. Before everyone left for the night, the group congratulated Megan Freyer who will be leaving the group and the school to travel with the Chicago based All- American Kickers. GOOD As usual, Megan Freyer was the first in the room. Dressed in her Just Dance jogging pants and a school pride T-shirt, she hooked up her classic black iPod, the one selected not because of tie classic but because black was the school’s color, and prepared herself for the group’s ritual Hello Dance. At the same time, she also prepared herself for leaving the dance room one last time. Freyer, voted by the team as best dancer and by the student body as most school spirited joined the Chicago based All-American Kickers, and rather than returning to be captain for the Panther Dancers next semester will be attending an online school program that will allow her to work around her schedule.

43  Weak leads  Used news or summary leads  Made sure readers knew your personal opinions  Used first or second person  Stated the obvious or generalizing situations rather than using the “show don’t tell” method  Used passive voice and took out all descriptions. Didn’t appeal to the senses with writing  Used cliches or pretentious descriptions  Included“Imagine this…,” “Have you ever…,” “Do you know…” or “Most people think…” leads

44 BAD Imagine laying immobilized on the football field waiting for an ambulance. Sounds scary, right? Well, that is exactly what happened to Lee York because an ambulance wasn’t requested for the game against Mansfield. And, get this, ambulances aren’t at any athletic games. They have to be called in after an injury occurs. GOOD For 45 minutes, freshman offensive lineman Lee York lay immobilized on the football field waiting for an ambulance as players and his worried parents looked on, helplessly trying to find out the condition of their son. "It took my breath away," Lee York's father, Bobby York said. Lee was on a kick off return on Oct. 19 against Mansfield when he was injured. "He made a tackle with his head down," head athletic trainer Scott Galloway said. Doctors later determined he suffered cervical strain on his spine and a concussion, Galloway said. * NSPA First Place, News Story By Parker Holland and Cory Brady Eagle Eye, DeSoto HS, DeSoto, TX

45  Used weak nut graphs  Bogged down the story with too much information  Use personal opinions not facts  Didn’t research topic so used generalities such as a few, some, many  Told too much at the start and took away from the reason for reading  Failed to reveal a theme or reason to write

46 BAD Scanning the quad at Granite Bay High School, a visitor would realize something - GBHS is dominated by white faces. The student body isn’t getting a feel of what the real world is like because most of the student body is white and there are only a few Hispanic and Asian students. GOOD Scanning the quad at Granite Bay High School, a visitor would realize something - GBHS is dominated by white faces. More than 88 percent of students at GBHS are white. Four percent are Asian, 4.7 percent are Hispanic - and just 1.6 percent are African American. For senior Courtney Cooper and other black students at GBHS, the difference of the color of their skin is more unconsciously realized than a daily issue. *Living in a sea of white: Lack of diversity can be difficult NSPA First Place, Diversity/Multiculturalism Story By Jessie Garton Gazette, Granite Bay HS, Granite Bay, CA

47  Weak body paragraphs:  Gave personal opinion in the transitions  Used quotes for facts rather than emotions  Structure of the story jumps so much that the reader couldn’t follow the story line  Moved from topic to topic without fleshing in the details

48 BAD AS A FEATURE LEAD While all Americans were influenced in some way by the terror of 9/11, the people of New York were particularly affected. None were more deeply impacted by the events of 9/11 than those who managed to survive the collapse of the World Trade Centers and the families and friends of those who did not. These individuals not only had to deal with the terrorism they had just witnessed in a very personal way, they faced many other emotions and issues as well. This paper is an examination of a widow who lost her husband in the collapse of the World Trade Centers. GOOD "Low points come and go," Sharon says. "This has been a rough week for me just because of the [six-month] memorial." Since the death of Marian, who was one of 189 people to perish in the Pentagon attack, Sharon has constantly called her brother (and Marian's husband) Bruce Serva in Washington to share in his grief. "If he's been having a good day, it's OK," Sharon says. "If he's been having a bad day, if he's been inundated with paperwork, that's hard for him to bring closure.“ *2002 NSPA The Echoes of Sept. 11 First Place, By Chen Wu Spark, Lakota East HS, Liberty Township, OH

49  Weak conclusions:  Let the conclusion become a summary  Used a list of facts than a list of facts, information about an event, etc. rather than a passionate quote  In the closing personally cheered on the subject of the story  Preached to the readers in your own voice instead of using information/quotes that may shape opinions

50 BAD Teen partying is bad and if teens can’t be responsible for themselves then the parents are going to have to step up and stay at home. Underage drinkers can’t be left at home alone over the weekend without a party happening. “When mom leaves for Kansas next week, I am going to have another party,” the host said. GOOD If the neighbors did not know about the party the night before, the sight of the host's front lawn confirms any suspicions. "There are always millions of beer cans," she said. "Whenever I go outside in the morning, I see my neighbors walking their dogs. They always give me dirty looks." The neighbors later call her mom, again. But next weekend, the mother's job requires another overnight trip, another party. *School's out, party's on NSPA 2002 First Place, Feature By Owen Skoler Highlander, McLean HS, McLean, VA

51 2003 Crystal meth: The dirty high hitting teens First Place, Feature By Jeff Katz Gazette, Granite Bay HS, Granite Bay, CA 2004 First Place, Feature and Brasler Prize Winner By Heiko Yang Spark, Lakota East HS, Liberty Township, Ohio 2005 First Place, Feature and Brasler Prize Winner By Mark Green Mane Events, McKinney HS, McKinney, Texas entpress.org/ns pa/contests.htm l#individual


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