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Hostos Center for Teaching and Learning on Tour: Sharing and Passing on Effective Strategies for Retention Nelson Nunez Rodriguez, Christine Hutchins,

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Presentation on theme: "Hostos Center for Teaching and Learning on Tour: Sharing and Passing on Effective Strategies for Retention Nelson Nunez Rodriguez, Christine Hutchins,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Hostos Center for Teaching and Learning on Tour: Sharing and Passing on Effective Strategies for Retention Nelson Nunez Rodriguez, Christine Hutchins, Sarah Brennan, Cynthia Jones, America Trinidad, Hostos Community College of The City University of New York 500 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY Introduction Research into retention consistently shows that models designed for student success at residential universities and liberal arts colleges do not have the same impact for students at commuter institutions and community colleges (Braxton, 2004; Pascarella, 2005; Seidman, 2005). Among most important insights that have emerged from researchers' revisions to earlier "one-size-fits-all" models for student success have been quantitative and qualitative studies showing that whereas social relationships loom large for retention at residential colleges and universities, academic relationships predominate at commuter and community colleges. For most commuter students, classrooms provide their primary connections to peers, faculty, staff, and, hence, to their institutions (Braxton, 2004). Consequently, the role of teaching and learning, and most especially active engagement of students, have farther reaching effects on students' persistence to degree completion at commuter and community colleges. Student learning networks flourish at such institutions "only if faculty members actively involve students in the process of learning" so as to provide "opportunities for student social interaction" (Braxton, 2004, 48-49). Hence, at Hostos, administration, faculty, and staff collaborate via its Center for Teaching and Learning in ongoing, team-oriented, and reflective forums that allow all members of the community to strategize, develop, and support teaching and learning practices that research has shown most foster the academic and social networks crucial to student success. The Role of Active Learning in Student PersistenceTheory of Student Departure in Commuter Institutions Discussion and Results The Center for Teaching and Learning established the Committee On Beautiful Ideas (COBI) to nurture the culture of faculty engagement in frequent interdisciplinary and cross-divisional innovations. From 2006, COBI has positively impacted student learning outcomes, and, therefore, retention and graduation rates. COBI understands pedagogy as a long-term metamorphosis including the freedom to imagine. In building this culture, the CTL offers stand-alone professional development opportunities as well as sustained conversations on specific topics over time for small groups of committed faculty during each academic year. Beginning in Fall 2011, the CTL is on tour making stops at all the different college departments. The tour stops allow for faculty from across the disciplines to share pedagogical strategies in department settings different from their own. The tour goals are: to discuss successful teaching approaches, challenges and opportunities with other instructors; promote a community of practice across the departments; and enlighten faculty and staff about alternate teaching and learning styles considering the plethora of cultural identities that we have in our New York urban institution. The tour, as a community-building activity, is not primarily about faculty and classrooms but about all members of the college everyday. In this regard, the conversations have underscored our need to understand the syllabus as living, dynamic, and community-based. This vision both reconciles teaching and learning styles and brings learners to the conversation. Each CTL tour month has a theme and tour dates are scheduled on random, non-traditional days and times during the week; therefore, the tour reaches a different cohort of participants each session. College staff running student support initiatives, such as the tutorial center, career services, and honor programs, participate along with faculty and administrators. Tour session attendants fill out surveys after each dialogue, and use follow-up loops for conversation. All survey responses and loop thoughts are part of a collective memoir from the tour stop conversations. Adapted from Toward understanding and Reducing College Student Departure (p. 43), by J. M. Braxton, A. S. Hirschy and S. A. McClendon, Copyright 2004 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. ► Student Persistence ◄ At Community Colleges Student Entry Characteristics Motivation Self-Efficacy Empathy and Personal Choice Parental Education Anticipatory Socialization Student External Environment Personal Finances, Support Networks Living Environment Work Family Responsibilities Campus Internal Environment Faculty Crafted Active Learning Environments Institution Designed Learning Communities External Integrity and Reputation Faculty and Staff Commitment to Student Welfare Nursing Department “Minimizing Classroom Disruptions” Humanities Conference Room “Hybrid Hangout” Natural Sciences Department “Safe Zone Allies and The Heroic Imagination Project” Behavioral and Social Sciences Department “Teaching with ePortfolios” Business Department “Service Learning, Experiential Learning, and Volunteering” Faculty Dining Room “Academic Freedom” Education Department “Teaching as Research: Projects and Case Studies” English Department “How Does a Lesson Plan?” “active learning practices that faculty use shape in students the perception that their college or university is committed to their welfare in general and their growth and development in particular, a perception that leads to their sense of social integration. The greater a student’s degree of social integration, the greater is his or her level of subsequent commitment to the college or university. The greater the student’s level of subsequent commitment to the college or university, the greater is his or her likelihood of persistence in the college or university of initial choice” John M. Braxton, Willis A. Jones, Amy S. Hirschy, and Harold V. Hartley III (Fall 2008) New Directions For Teaching and Learning Effective Assignment Design Workshops Professional Development Initiative Week COBI Competition and Retreats Hostos Legacy Seminar Series Featured Speakers and Lecture Series A Day at the Professional Development Spa! May 2011 Adjunct Junction (Eunice Flemister) Jailbreak: Academic Freedom is on the Loose (Craig Bernardini, Ernest Ialongo, Gregory Marks) Don’t Do It: Ethics and Integrity in Teaching and Student Work (Cynthia Jones, Clarence Robertson, America Trinidad) Safe Zone at Hostos: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Support (Christine Hutchins, Leigh Phillips and Elyse Zucker) CTL On Tour New Faculty OrientationAuthor of the Month Brown Bag Lunch Special Guest Speakers Helen Barrett, emerita, U. of Alaska Randy Bass, Georgetown U. Alma Clayton-Pederson, emerita, AAC&U Charles Dziuban, U. Central Florida Sharon Hamilton, IUPUI Jim Keen, emeritus, Antioch College Debbie Langsom, emerita, UNC Leila May-Landy, Columbia U. Judy Patton, Portland State U. Candice Reynolds, Portland State U. David Schoem, Michigan U. C. Clint Sidle, Cornell U. Nancy Sommers, Harvard U. Maryellen Weimer, The Teaching Professor Adjunct Pedagogical Workshops Faculty Investigation Groups


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