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Chapter 14 Sampling McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2011 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 14 Sampling McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2011 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 14 Sampling McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2011 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

2 14-2 Learning Objectives Understand... The two premises on which sampling theory is based. The accuracy and precision for measuring sample validity. The five questions that must be answered to develop a sampling plan.

3 14-3 Learning Objectives Understand... The two categories of sampling techniques and the variety of sampling techniques within each category. The various sampling techniques and when each is used.

4 14-4 Small Samples Can Enlighten “ The proof of the pudding is in the eating. By a small sample we may judge of the whole piece.” Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra author

5 14-5 PulsePoint: Research Revelation 80 The average number of text messages sent per day by American teens.

6 14-6 The Nature of Sampling Population Population Element Census Sample Sampling frame

7 14-7 Why Sample? Greater accuracy Availability of elements Availability of elements Greater speed Sampling provides Sampling provides Lower cost

8 14-8 What Is a Sufficiently Large Sample? “In recent Gallup ‘Poll on polls,’... When asked about the scientific sampling foundation on which polls are based... most said that a survey of 1,500 – 2,000 respondents—a larger than average sample size for national polls—cannot represent the views of all Americans.” Frank Newport The Gallup Poll editor in chief The Gallup Organization

9 14-9 When Is a Census Appropriate? NecessaryFeasible

10 14-10 What Is a Valid Sample? AccuratePrecise

11 14-11 Sampling Design within the Research Process

12 14-12 Types of Sampling Designs Element Selection ProbabilityNonprobability UnrestrictedSimple randomConvenience RestrictedComplex randomPurposive SystematicJudgment ClusterQuota StratifiedSnowball Double

13 14-13 Steps in Sampling Design What is the target population? What are the parameters of interest? What is the sampling frame? What is the appropriate sampling method? What size sample is needed?

14 14-14 When to Use Larger Sample? Desired precision Number of subgroups Number of subgroups Confidence level Population variance Small error range

15 14-15 Simple Random Advantages Easy to implement with random dialing Disadvantages Requires list of population elements Time consuming Larger sample needed Produces larger errors High cost

16 14-16 Systematic Advantages Simple to design Easier than simple random Easy to determine sampling distribution of mean or proportion Disadvantages Periodicity within population may skew sample and results Trends in list may bias results Moderate cost

17 14-17 Stratified Advantages Control of sample size in strata Increased statistical efficiency Provides data to represent and analyze subgroups Enables use of different methods in strata Disadvantages Increased error if subgroups are selected at different rates Especially expensive if strata on population must be created High cost

18 14-18 Cluster Advantages Provides an unbiased estimate of population parameters if properly done Economically more efficient than simple random Lowest cost per sample Easy to do without list Disadvantages Often lower statistical efficiency due to subgroups being homogeneous rather than heterogeneous Moderate cost

19 14-19 Stratified and Cluster Sampling Stratified Population divided into few subgroups Homogeneity within subgroups Heterogeneity between subgroups Choice of elements from within each subgroup Cluster Population divided into many subgroups Heterogeneity within subgroups Homogeneity between subgroups Random choice of subgroups

20 14-20 Area Sampling

21 14-21 Double Sampling Advantages May reduce costs if first stage results in enough data to stratify or cluster the population Disadvantages Increased costs if discriminately used

22 14-22 Nonprobability Samples Cost Feasibility Time No need to generalize Limited objectives

23 14-23 Nonprobability Sampling Methods Convenience Judgment Quota Snowball

24 14-24 Key Terms Area sampling Census Cluster sampling Convenience sampling Disproportionate stratified sampling Double sampling Judgment sampling Multiphase sampling Nonprobability sampling Population Population element Population parameters Population proportion of incidence Probability sampling

25 14-25 Key Terms Proportionate stratified sampling Quota sampling Sample statistics Sampling Sampling error Sampling frame Sequential sampling Simple random sample Skip interval Snowball sampling Stratified random sampling Systematic sampling Systematic variance

26 Appendix 14a Determining Sample Size McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2011 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

27 14-27 Random Samples

28 14-28 Increasing Precision

29 14-29 Confidence Levels & the Normal Curve

30 14-30 Standard Errors Standard Error (Z score) % of AreaApproximate Degree of Confidence 1.0068.2768% 1.6590.1090% 1.9695.0095% 3.0099.7399%

31 14-31 Central Limit Theorem

32 14-32 Estimates of Dining Visits ConfidenceZ score % of Area Interval Range (visits per month) 68%1.0068.279.48-10.52 90%1.6590.109.14-10.86 95%1.9695.008.98-11.02 99%3.0099.738.44-11.56

33 14-33 Calculating Sample Size for Questions involving Means Precision Confidence level Size of interval estimate Population Dispersion Need for FPA

34 14-34 Metro U Sample Size for Means StepsInformation Desired confidence level95% (z = 1.96) Size of the interval estimate .5 meals per month Expected range in population 0 to 30 meals Sample mean10 Standard deviation4.1 Need for finite population adjustment No Standard error of the mean.5/1.96 =.255 Sample size(4.1) 2 / (.255) 2 = 259

35 14-35 Proxies of the Population Dispersion Previous research on the topic Pilot test or pretest Rule-of-thumb calculation –1/6 of the range

36 14-36 Metro U Sample Size for Proportions StepsInformation Desired confidence level95% (z = 1.96) Size of the interval estimate .10 (10%) Expected range in population0 to 100% Sample proportion with given attribute 30% Sample dispersionPq =.30(1-.30) =.21 Finite population adjustmentNo Standard error of the proportion.10/1.96 =.051 Sample size.21/ (.051) 2 = 81

37 14-37 Appendix 14a: Key Terms Central limit theorem Confidence interval Confidence level Interval estimate Point estimate Proportion

38 Addendum: Keynote CloseUp McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2011 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

39 14-39 Keynote Experiment

40 14-40 Keynote Experiment (cont.)

41 Determining Sample Size Appendix 14a McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2011 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

42 14-42 Random Samples

43 14-43 Confidence Levels

44 14-44 Metro U. Dining Club Study


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