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CANADIAN LANGUAGE BENCHMARKS: READING AND LISTENING ASSESSING STUDENT READING AND LISTENING IN LINC CLASSES BASED ON THE CANADIAN LANGUAGE BENCHMARKS.

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Presentation on theme: "CANADIAN LANGUAGE BENCHMARKS: READING AND LISTENING ASSESSING STUDENT READING AND LISTENING IN LINC CLASSES BASED ON THE CANADIAN LANGUAGE BENCHMARKS."— Presentation transcript:

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2 CANADIAN LANGUAGE BENCHMARKS: READING AND LISTENING ASSESSING STUDENT READING AND LISTENING IN LINC CLASSES BASED ON THE CANADIAN LANGUAGE BENCHMARKS 2000 Presented by the CLB/LINC Projects Office Angela Audet, CLB Consultant

3 This presentation will include: 1. Review of task-based planning and assessment of CLB competencies 2. Choosing Benchmark appropriate materials: reading and listening texts 3. Checking for comprehension: designing questions that assess Benchmark achievement 4. Capturing learner performance: rating scales and competency checklists

4 Features of the Benchmarks Pawlikowska-Smith, VIII-IX.

5 Example of Task-Based Instruction  LINC 4 (S-5, L-5, R-4, W-4)  Theme: Employment  Topics:  Job searching  Employer expectations in Canada  Importance of networking and volunteering  Sample resumes, cover letters, and application forms (posting an online resume)  Interviews

6 Example of Task-Based Instruction Job Searching and Interviews Identify real life tasks Identify job search strategies Read job postings Fill out employment application forms (paper and online) Write about past work experience Answer standard questions at a job interview How can you bring these tasks into the classroom?

7 Possible Assessment Tasks CLB Competencies (5,5,4,4) Language Focus Read moderately complex article about job searching strategies and answer comprehension questions (R) Fill out a 20 item online employment application form (W) Write a one paragraph description of past work experience and plans for the future (W) Listen to a narrative text about tips for job interviews and answer comprehension questions (L) Role play a job interview in which learner answers standard interview questions (S) IV. Get the gist, key information and important details of a simple 2-3 paragraph text III. Fill out a moderately complex 20 item application form IV. Write a short text about a personal experience and future plans. Explain reasons. III. Demonstrate factual details and inferred meanings in simple advice and suggestions IV. (Interaction one-on-one) ask for and provide information related to routine daily activities Vocabulary: Terms related to employment ads (salary, references, benefits, EOE, common abbreviations) Terms related to describing work experience, skills, preferences Idioms and expressions in a typical interview, adjectives to describe personal qualities (hard working, motivated, etc.) Grammar: Present perfect and simple past tenses to talk about work history and experience Frequency adverbs (always, often, never) Typical yes/no and wh- interview questions

8 Possible Assessment Tasks CLB Competencies (5,5,4,4) Language Focus Read moderately complex article about job searching strategies and answer comprehension questions (R) Fill out a 20 item online employment application form (W) Write a one paragraph description of past work experience and plans for the future (W) Listen to a narrative text about tips for job interviews and answer comprehension questions (L) Role play a job interview in which learner answers standard interview questions (S) IV. Get the gist, key information and important details of a simple 2-3 paragraph text III. Fill out a moderately complex 20 item application form IV. Write a short text about a personal experience and future plans. Explain reasons. III. Demonstrate factual details and inferred meanings in simple advice and suggestions, announcements and commercials IV. (Interaction one-on-one) ask for and provide information related to routine daily activities Vocabulary: Terms related to employment ads (salary, references, benefits, EOE, common abbreviations) Terms related to describing work experience, skills, preferences Idioms and expressions in a typical interview, adjectives to describe personal qualities Grammar: Present perfect and simple past tenses to talk about work history and experience Frequency adverbs (always, often, never) Typical yes/no and wh- interview questions

9 Choosing Reading and Listening Texts How do I know if the materials I am using are appropriate for my students’ Benchmark levels?

10 Choosing Reading and Listening Texts TASK TEXT SUPPORT

11 Choosing Reading and Listening Texts 1. Identify the CLB Competency Outcomes that you will focus on for this listening or reading text. 2. Review the Performance Conditions from the CLB 2000 to determine the level of difficulty. 3. Look at the comprehension questions that accompany the text. Do the questions match the Performance Indicators for the selected CLB Competencies?

12 Review Performance Conditions for Reading CLB 4 Pawlikowska-Smith (2000), p. 36

13 Pawlikowska-Smith (2004), p. 413

14 1. Identify Competency Outcomes for CLB 4 Reading Read moderately complex article about job searching strategies and answer comprehension questions (R) Pawlikowska-Smith (2000), p. 37

15 Pawlikowska-Smith (2004), p. 414

16 CLB 5 Listening Sample 1. Watch the video on “Interview Dos and Don’ts”. (4 min, 15 sec) _mode=true&persist_safety_mode=1&safe=active 2. Review the Performance Conditions for Listening Benchmark 5 on the next slide.

17 Does this video match what Benchmark 5 listeners can be reasonably expected to be able to do for a listening task? Pawlikowska-Smith (2000), p. 76

18 What kind of assessment activity would you design to check for comprehension? Pawlikowska-Smith (2000), p. 36

19 Designing Comprehension Questions How do I design comprehension questions that are appropriate for my students’ Benchmark levels?

20 Designing Comprehension Questions General rules to follow: 1. Comprehension questions should generate responses that are clearly correct or incorrect, and therefore easy to assess a student’s level of understanding.

21 Designing Comprehension Questions General rules to follow: 1. Comprehension questions should generate responses that are clearly correct or incorrect, and therefore easy to assess a student’s level of understanding. 2. Higher level, critical thinking questions become necessary beginning at the CLB 4 level, and can be used as a method of integrating Speaking and Writing assessment.

22 Literal Comprehension: Memory Questions

23  Important at all Benchmarks  Who, what, where, when?  Reproducing stated facts by naming, matching, defining, identifying, or giving yes/no or true/false responses  Performance Indicators: identifying factual details, key words, and gist

24 Interpretive/Referential Questions: Convergent thinking questions

25  Begins with simple forms at CLB 3, and with regularity from CLB 4  Why, how, in what ways? Close-ended questions based on analysis and integration of stated facts.  Explaining why an event occurred, stating cause and effect relationships, comparing and contrasting  Performance Indicators: identifying main idea, purpose, inferring contextual and situational details, guessing meaning of new words…

26 Interpretive/Referential Questions: Convergent thinking questions  In what ways did Susan communicate to her boss that she is unhappy with her current position?  How did Li Fe determine that she needed to make some changes to her lifestyle?  Describe 3 advantages and 3 disadvantages of buying on credit.

27 Interpretive/Referential Questions: Divergent thinking questions

28  Begin with simple forms at CLB 4, and with regularity from CLB 5  Imagine if, suppose, predict, if…then, how might, what are some possible consequences of… Open-ended questions where the learner is free to generate their own ideas, opinions, and conclusions  Performance Indicators: making predictions about what will happen next, identifying tone or attitude of a speaker or writer, comparing facts to make choices

29 Interpretive/Referential Questions: Divergent thinking questions (In what ways did Susan communicate to her boss that she is unhappy with her current position?) What are some possible consequences of how she acted? What is a word that would describe Susan’s tone when speaking to her boss? (How did Li Fe determine that she needed to make some changes to her lifestyle?) Suppose Li Fe did not make changes to her current lifestyle. How might the stress she experiences hurt her health? (Describe 3 advantages and 3 disadvantages of buying on credit.) If you do not pay your credit card bill, then you will receive a bad credit history. How could this affect your ability to buy a house in the future?

30 Critical Comprehension: Evaluative Questions

31  Begin with simple forms at CLB 5, and with regularity at CLB 6 and higher.  Defend, justify, what is your opinion about – Open-ended questions, evaluating matters of judgment, values, and choice  Performance Indicators: responding to requests for opinions and attitudes relating to the text  Integrates with Speaking and Writing Indicators for expression or analysis of opinions or feelings (especially for abstract expression at CLB 8)

32 Critical Comprehension: Evaluative Questions (What are some possible consequences of how she acted? What is a word that would describe Susan’s tone when speaking to her boss? ) Was Susan justified in her unhappiness at work? What advice would you offer Susan? How is this scenario similar or different to how people communicate with employers/bosses in your home country? (Suppose Li Fe did not make changes to her current lifestyle. How might the stress she experiences hurt her health?) Describe your own experience in handling stress. Do you deal with stress effectively? Provide examples to support your response. Do you think that stress can sometimes be a positive response to life’s challenges? (If you do not pay your credit card bill, then you will receive a bad credit history. How could this affect your ability to buy a house in the future?) Refer to the graph “Canadian debt, ”. Consider the items for which Canadians typically carry debt. Which items do you feel a person is most justified in purchasing on credit? Explain your reasoning.

33 Designing Comprehension Questions General rules to follow: 1. Comprehension questions should generate responses that are clearly correct or incorrect, and therefore easy to assess a student’s level of understanding. 2. Higher level, critical thinking questions become necessary beginning at the CLB 4 level, and can be used as a method of integrating Speaking and Writing assessment.

34 Tracking Competency Achievement: Rating Scales and Competency Checklists How do I keep track of the competencies I have assessed? How do I determine if a student is ready to move up a benchmark?

35 Rating Scale for L/R Assessment Pawlikowska-Smith (2000), p. 84

36 Rating Scale for L/R Assessment

37 Tracking Achievement of CLB Outcomes Sylvie 3 1/26 Job Search Article

38 Tracking Achievement of CLB Outcomes

39 Planning Checklist of CLB Outcomes

40 REFERENCES Copkov, et al. (2003). The Adult ESL Curriculum Guidelines. Toronto, ON: Toronto Catholic District School Board. Hajer, Anne, et al. (Sept. 2002). Ontario LINC Curriculum Guidelines. Toronto, ON: Toronto Catholic District School Board. Holmes, Tara, et al. (2001) Canadian Language Benchmarks 2000: A Guide to Implementation. Alberta and Ottawa, ON: Alberta Learning and Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks. Holmes, Tara. (2005). Integrating CLB Assessment into your CLB Classroom. Ottawa, ON: Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks. Manitoba Labour and Immigration Adult Language Training Branch. (2009). Reading Task Outcome Assessment, pp. 2-3, Manitoba Module Bank: Mohamad, Akmar, “What Do We Test When We Test Reading Comprehension?” The Internet TESL Journal, Vol. V, No. 12, December 1999, Reading.html. Pawlikowska-Smith, G. (2000). Canadian Language Benchmarks Ottawa, ON: Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks. Pawlikowska-Smith, G. (2004). SAM: Summative Assessment Manual for Teachers, V. 2: Canadian Language Benchmarks 3 & 4. Ottawa, ON: Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks.

41 Happy Benchmarking! Presented by: Angela Audet CLB Consultant, CLB/LINC Projects Office 692/english%20teachers%20comic.jpg


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