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Social Change and The Future of Education Michael Adams April 29, 2005 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P.

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Presentation on theme: "Social Change and The Future of Education Michael Adams April 29, 2005 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P."— Presentation transcript:

1 Social Change and The Future of Education Michael Adams April 29, 2005 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P

2 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics In 2001 most thought Canada was becoming more like the U.S.?

3 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Identify with people who put their family above everything else

4 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Father of family must be master in his own house Canada and the United States - Agree 1992, 1996, 2000

5 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Father of family must be master in his own house Canada and the United States – Women agree Women 10 Women with Post- secondary 17 Singles Canada U.S.

6 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics The Environics program does not poll public opinion and perceptions, but rather people’s personal values, motivations and mindsets Survey Methodology Environics uses a large battery of questions and statements to measure and track social values National representative surveys of 6,245 Americans and 8,168 Canadians aged 15+ for a total of 14,413 interviews Fielded in 1992, 1996, and 2000 – prior to each Presidential election and annually in Canada since 1983

7 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics 101 Social Values Are Tracked, for example Acceptance of Violence Adaptability to Complexity American Dream Anomie and Aimlessness Concern for Appearance Everyday Ethics Everyday Rage Flexible Gender Identity Heterarchy Joy of Consumption Just Deserts Largesse Oblige Mysterious Forces Patriarchy Penchant for Risk Question Authority Sexual Permissiveness Spiritual Quest Vitality Xenophobia

8 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics AUTHORITY INDIVIDUALITY SURVIVAL FULFILMENT Acceptance of Violence Active Government Anomie-Aimlessness Just Deserts Civic Apathy Confidence in Advertising Confidence in Big Business Ecological Fatalism Everyday Rage Living Virtually More Power for Business Patriarchy Racial Fusion Technology Anxiety Voluntary Simplicity Xenophobia Ostentatious Consumption Fatalism Importance of Brand Importance of Aesthetics Enthusiasm for New Technology More Power for Media Penchant for Risk Joy of Consumption Advertising as Stimulus Multiculturalism Sexual Permissiveness Need for Status Recognition More Power for Politics Attraction for Crowds Saving on Principle Networking Confidence in Small Business Intuition & Impulse Personal Escape Protection of Privacy Largesse Oblige Community Involvement Adaptive Navigation Look Good Feel Good Pursuit of Intensity Trust in Personal Advisors Fear of Violence Discerning Hedonism Personal Challenge Obedience to Authority Vitality Celebrating Passages Parochialism Traditional Gender Identity Adaptability to Complexity Search for Roots Ecological Concern Equal Relationship with Youth Financial Security Work Ethic Aversion to Complexity Religion a la Carte Primacy of the Family Interest in the Unexplained Propriety Faith in Science Mysterious Forces Traditional Family Social Intimacy National Pride Emotional Control American Dream Heterarchy Time Stress Concern for Appearance Duty Flexible Gender Identity Sensualism Social Responsibility Ethical Consumerism Global Consciousness Cultural Assimilation Effort Toward Health Religiosity Holistic Health Culture Sampling Question Authority Discriminating Consumerism Entrepreneurialism Personal Creativity Meaningful Moments Spiritual Quest Rejection of Order Personal Expression Gender Parity Importance of Spontaneity Everyday Ethics Introspection & Empathy Flexible Families Personal Control Skepticism of Advertising Civic Engagement Buying on Impulse Brand Apathy Sexism The U.S. Socio-Cultural Map

9 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics The United States Socio-Cultural Map: North-South Axis and Selected Trends AUTHORITY INDIVIDUALITY SURVIVAL FULFILMENT Sexual Permissiveness Obedience to Authority Equal Relationship with Youth Traditional Family Heterarchy Duty Flexible Families Question Authority Religiosity Work Ethic Everyday Ethics Propriety Patriarchy Flexible Gender Identity

10 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics The United States Socio-Cultural Map: East-West Axis and Selected Trends AUTHORITY INDIVIDUALITY SURVIVAL FULFILMENT Just Deserts Everyday Rage Xenophobia Ecological Concern Spiritual Quest Introspection and Empathy Personal Control Sexism Fatalism Gender Parity Acceptance of Violence Ecological Fatalism Anomie and Aimlessness Civic Engagement Global Consciousness Ethical Consumerism

11 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics The Socio-Cultural Map INDIVIDUALITY FULFILMENT SURVIVAL AUTHORITY Duty, Social Responsibility, Everyday Ethics, Gender Parity, Spiritual Quest, Holistic Health Authenticity & Responsibility: Well-being, Harmony and Responsibility Status & Security: Obedience to Traditional Structures and Norms Obedience to Authority, Patriarchy, Work Ethic, Need for Status Recognition, Technology Anxiety Idealism & Autonomy : Exploration and Flexibility Personal Control, Question Authority, Global Consciousness, Adaptability to Complexity, Flexible Families Exclusion & Intensity: Seeking Stimulus and Attention Pursuit of Intensity, Ostentatious Consumption, Buying on Impulse, Penchant for Risk, Anomie and Aimlessness, Everyday Rage

12 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Status & Security – Icons John Wayne Don Rumsfeld Vince Lombardi Bill O’Reilly Hillary Clinton Ronald Reagan

13 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Authenticity & Responsibility – Icons Jesus Christ Martha Stewart Oprah Winfrey Shirley MacLaine Colin Powell Tiger Woods

14 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Idealism & Autonomy – Icons Lisa Simpson Bono Erin Brokovich Michael Moore Martin Luther King Jr. Larry Page & Sergey Brin

15 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Exclusion & Intensity – Icons The Osbournes Eminem Jerry Springer Jennifer Lopez Joe Millionaire P.Diddy Tony Hawk Pamela Anderson

16 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics The United States and Canada

17 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics INDIVIDUALITY AUTHORITY Idealism & Autonomy Status & Security FULFILMENT SURVIVAL Authenticity & Responsibility Exclusion & Intensity Year of Study

18 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics INDIVIDUALITY AUTHORITY Idealism & Autonomy Status & Security FULFILMENT SURVIVAL Authenticity & Responsibility Exclusion & Intensity Deep South Plains Mid West South Atlantic Texarkana Mid Atlantic Mountain New England Pacific B.C. Ontario Atlantic Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta Quebec Regions of North America combined

19 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics INDIVIDUALITY AUTHORITY Idealism & Autonomy Status & Security FULFILMENT SURVIVAL Authenticity & Responsibility Exclusion & Intensity Under

20 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Aimless Dependent Teens ( )

21 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics The Pig in the Python Tracking the Cohort from Proportion which are Aimless Dependents (15-18) (19-22) (23-26) (27-30) Canada United States (15-18) (19-22) (23-26) (27-30)

22 Canada and the U.S Examples of Divergence

23 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Father of family must be master in his own house Canada - Regions: Agree 2000

24 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Father of family must be master in his own house US - Regions: Agree Alberta New England Plains Pacific Mid-Atlantic Mid-West Mountain Texarcana South-Atlantic Deep South

25 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Father of family must be master in his own house Europe and North America: Agree 2000

26 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics It is necessary to believe in God in order to be moral Source: Pew Global Attitudes, June 2003

27 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Belief in Heaven, Hell and the Devil Source for Canadian numbers: Environics Research Group, 2001; exact wording: “Would you say you believe…that there is a devil; in hell; in heaven Source for U.S. numbers: Gallup, May 2004; exact wording: “For each of the following items I am going to read you, please tell me whether it is something you believe in, something you’re not sure about, or something you don’t believe in Heaven 70 Hell 70 Devil U.S. Canada

28 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Patriarchy, Church Attendance and Gun Ownership

29 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Research by Environics Analytics & Claritas found 66 PRIZM lifestyle types in each of Canada and the U.S. Only 16 of the 66 lifestyles are common to both countries 27% of American households 25% of Canadian households Another confirmation of Canada/U.S. differences: Neighbourhood lifestyle research

30 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics

31 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Geographically and demographically, Canadians are different Concentration in Large Urban Centres  Canada : 39% of population in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver  USA: 17% of population in New York, L.A. and Chicago Location of Wealth  Canada: established urban neighbourhoods  USA: suburban areas Immigration  Canada:18% of population  USA:11% of population

32 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics Since Fire and Ice more Canadians are seeing the differences

33 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics In Summary The U.S.Canada Risk-takingRisk-averse Money is everythingMoney is suspect Winner takes allIncome redistribution Highest standard of livingBest quality of life Will win the lotteryHave won the lottery Aspiration Accommodation

34 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics The U.S.Canada ReligiousSecular Traditional authorityQuestion traditional authority Conservative social valuesLiberal social values MoralismRelativism / pluralism Outer-directed (conformity)Inner-directed (autonomy) Violence is normalViolence only on skates Civil WarRebellions, Legal separation Death penalty No death penalty since 1976 In Summary

35 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics The U.S.Canada Neo-conservatism Sustainable social welfare state Direct Democracy: Initiative, referendumParliamentary democracy in a recall and total recallfirst past the post electoral system Gated communities and SUVsMulticultural cities and minivans Unilateralism, pre-emptive strikes/warsUnited Nations, International Criminal Court, Kyoto Protocol, peacekeeping Jazz, baseball, movies, Internet and Hockey, medicare and Cirque du Soleil Man on the Moon But, thankfully, we do share one thing … a sense of humour In Summary

36 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics United StatesCanada Greater gap between rich and poorSmaller gap between rich and poor Retreat from public domain to privateMaintain public domain/pragmatism spheres Erosion of public educationMaintain public education Social Change of the Future of Education

37 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics United StatesCanada Frantic search for safe enclaves/All schools expected to begood schools Vouchers/tax credits to shop for Choice within the public system/ public and private education no tax relief for private education Home schoolingEarly childhood education (not day care) Retreat from common groundContinuing search for common to warring campsground / compromise Social Change of the Future of Education

38 OCTSA Apr 29 Environics and follow link to Fire and Ice survey Find Your Quadrant

39 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P 33 Bloor Street East, Suite 900 Toronto, Canada M4W 3H1 Tel: / Fax:


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