Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 From Cradle to Career: Preparing San Jose’s Youth for the Digital Age Where We Stand Now: A Preliminary Overview March 2001 Prepared by: Resource Development.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 From Cradle to Career: Preparing San Jose’s Youth for the Digital Age Where We Stand Now: A Preliminary Overview March 2001 Prepared by: Resource Development."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 From Cradle to Career: Preparing San Jose’s Youth for the Digital Age Where We Stand Now: A Preliminary Overview March 2001 Prepared by: Resource Development Associates (925)

2 2 Population

3 3 Background  In Santa Clara County there has been a steady increase in the Latino and Asian/Pacific Islander populations during the 1990’s  At the current rate of change, the Asian/Pacific Islander population will surpass that of Latinos early in the 2000 decade  Conversely, in the City of San Jose, the Latino population is growing at a faster rate than the Asian/Pacific Islander population Population

4 4 e Source: Adapted from US Census Bureau & California Dep’t. of Finance Projections

5 5 Population

6 6 Infancy and Early Childhood

7 7 Background  Low birth weight babies are ten times more likely to die in their first year than normal weight babies.  Birth weight is an indicator of overall perinatal health: it is impacted by adequacy of health care, mother’s nutrition, smoking, and substance use. How are we doing?  Rates in San Jose have consistently worsened over the last decade.  City and County rates are now about the same as the state rate. Low Birthweight Births Infancy and Early Childhood

8 8 Source: CA Department of Health Services, Birth Cohort Files Infancy and Early Childhood

9 9 Background  Teen mothers are at high risk for school drop-out, for being abused, and for poverty.  Babies of teen mothers are at high risk for infant mortality, for being abused, and for poor educational outcomes. How are we doing?  Rates for San Jose have declined by 20% over the past decade. Births to teens Infancy and Early Childhood

10 10 Source: CA Department of Health Services, Birth Cohort Files Infancy and Early Childhood

11 11 Background  In 1998, 60% of children under 14 had a single working parent or both parents in the workforce. How are we doing?  Over the past five years, the number of children under 14 has grown five times as fast as the number of childcare slots.  Need is greatest for infant slots. Only 12% of the estimated need is met by current childcare supply.  Preschool care costs an average of $135 per week per child; this is two-thirds of the salary of a full- time minimum-wage worker. Infancy and Early Childhood Childcare

12 12 Source: Kids in Common, Silicon Valley Children’s Report Card

13 13 Basic Needs

14 14 Background  Although high family income does not predict to educational success, low family income does correlate with educational failure.  Economic inequality has been shown to be linked to lowered health status and increased educational failure for all income levels. How are we doing?  Through most of the 1990’s income of the bottom 20% of households declined or remained stagnant. Basic Needs Income

15 15  In 1999, after 7 years of economic growth, the bottom 20% of households finally attained the same median income that they had had in  In the same period, the income of the top 20% of households increased by 20%. Basic Needs Income, continued

16 16 Adjusted to represent a household of four, 1999 dollars Source: Joint Venture’s 2001 Index of Silicon Valley Basic Needs

17 17 Basic Needs Source: Occupational Outlook Quarterly - Winter 2000

18 18 Background  Housing costs have a dramatic impact on the stability of communities. Higher housing costs lead to longer commutes and less parental time spent with families. How are we doing?  In 2000, only 16% of houses were affordable to a family with the median County income.  Over the past decade, median rents have gone up over 50% while median household income has increased less than 25%.  A preschool teacher would have to pay 80% of her income to afford the median rental. Basic Needs Housing

19 19 Source: Joint Venture’s 2001 Index of Silicon Valley Basic Needs

20 20 Source: Joint Venture’s 2001 Index of Silicon Valley Basic Needs

21 21 Source: Joint Venture’s 2001 Index of Silicon Valley Basic Needs

22 22 Education

23 23 High school graduation Background?  High school drop-out rates have been shown to be strongly correlated to parental education level, family support for education and the student’s level of hope for the future. How are we doing?  Four-year drop-out rates have declined significantly in the state and Santa Clara County, but have remained static in San Jose.  Drop-out rates vary greatly by ethnicity. Latino youth are particularly at risk for dropping out. Education

24 24 Source: California Department of Education, Education Demographics Unit Education

25 25 How are we doing?  Reading was the major problem area for all categories of student and all districts.  Between 2nd and 11th grade, English proficient students’ reading score fell by 20% compared to the national average.  Between 2nd and 11th grade, limited-English proficient students’ reading scores fell by 60%.  For language and math scores, non-LEP students scored well above the national average, but large groups of LEP students are very much at-risk. Education Test Scores

26 26 Education Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website

27 27 Source: California Department of Education, Ed-Data Website Education

28 28 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website Education

29 29 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website Education

30 30 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website Education

31 31 Career Preparation

32 32 Preparation for secondary school Background  A two-year community college degree will a minimum requirement for a well-paying job in the digital future. How are we doing?  The number of high school graduates in San Jose completing the required course for UC/CSU admission has grown dramatically over the past decade.  Completion of US/CSU requirements varies dramatically by ethnicity. Drop-out rates vary greatly by ethnicity. Only 22% of Latino and 9% of Pacific Islander youth completed these requirements. Career Preparation

33 33 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website

34 34 Source: California Dept. of Education, Ed-Data Website

35 35 Community Assets

36 36 Background  The Search Institute’s Cornerstone Project surveyed: 7,000 7th-12th Graders in Santa Clara County and 100,000 6th-12th Graders Nationally regarding 40 Developmental Assets. How are we doing?  Santa Clara youth fare poorer in relation to national youth on External Assets (support from adults and the community).  Santa Clara youth fare better than national youth on most Internal Assets (commitment to learning, personal values, and social competencies) Developmental Assets Community Assets

37 37 How are we doing?  Santa Clara youth fare poorer on Positive Identity Internal Assets (e.g., self-esteem).  Youth feel self-motivated to do well.  Youth perceive adults and community as disconnected and uncaring.  Students do not feel engaged at school and report being frequently bored. Developmental Assets, continued Community Assets

38 38 High Points of the Cornerstone Project Survey: Percentages of Santa Clara County Youth who experienced these assets:  62% feel family life provides high levels of love and support.  62% accept and takes personal responsibility.  65% are optimistic about their personal future.  66% are motivated to do well in school.  73% do at least one hour of homework per day. Developmental Assets, continued Community Assets

39 39 Low Points of the Cornerstone Project Survey:  Only 35% receive support from 3 or more non- parent adults.  Only 30% experience caring neighbors.  Only 24% see parents and other adults model positive, responsible behaviors.  Only 22% feel school provides a caring, encouraging environment.  Only 15% feel that adults value youth. Developmental Assets, continued Community Assets


Download ppt "1 From Cradle to Career: Preparing San Jose’s Youth for the Digital Age Where We Stand Now: A Preliminary Overview March 2001 Prepared by: Resource Development."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google