Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Trees and Public Health: Growing a Healthy Human Habitat Frances E. (Ming) Kuo University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign CA Public Health, 2010.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Trees and Public Health: Growing a Healthy Human Habitat Frances E. (Ming) Kuo University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign CA Public Health, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Trees and Public Health: Growing a Healthy Human Habitat Frances E. (Ming) Kuo University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign CA Public Health, 2010

3  Andrea Faber Taylor  Rebekah Coley, Liesette Brunson, Stephen DePooter, Malen Bacaicoa, Ann Schlosser, ByoungSuk Kweon, Angela Wiley, Irene Miles, Lisa Canin, William Sullivan, Johanna Weber, XiaoYing Wang, Xinlin Yu  US Forest Service and NUCFAC, CREES  US HUD Thanks to …

4 Trees and Public Health

5 What do trees have to do with public health?  Nothing  Something  Everything

6 Nothing

7  They’re pretty  They cause allergies, drop limbs on people  Funding for greening is funding that could have gone towards health promotion Nothing

8 Something

9  They clean our air  They clean our water  They help prevent flooding  They reduce urban heat island effects  Parks support recreation Something

10 Everything

11  They are essential components of a healthy human habitat  They enable us to thrive – socially, physically, psychologically  Funding for greening is funding for health promotion Everything

12 Trees and other natural elements as essential to a healthy human habitat

13  Why ask?  How would we tell?  Overview of the evidence  The evidence is actionable  What the evidence is telling us Trees, other Natural Elements as Essential

14 Trees and other natural elements as essential to a healthy human habitat: Why ask?

15 Humans evolved in nature  Primates appear 65 mya  Hominids appear 5 mya  Tool use appears 2 mya  10-15,000 years ago, Homo sapiens begin to cultivate crops, settle into villages  99.5% of the last 2M years embedded in the natural environment Why ask?

16 Mobile organisms are drawn toward fit habitats  Habitat selection theory  Environmental preference as a marker for fit habitat Why ask?

17 What environments are humans drawn to? Why ask?

18

19

20

21 Humans are drawn toward environments with trees and other natural elements  A strong and ubiquitous finding  25 years of landscape preference research Why ask?

22 Thus, we suspect that trees and other natural elements might be essential to a healthy human habitat

23 How would we tell?

24 Hints from ethology, laboratory animals, and zoos  Organisms are attuned to their habitats in subtle and powerful ways How would we tell?

25 Hints from ethology, laboratory animals, and zoos  Organisms are attuned to their habitats in subtle and powerful ways  Organisms housed in unfit habitats undergo social, psychological, and physical breakdown How would we tell?

26 The signs  IF trees and other natural elements are essential elements of a healthy human habitat,  THEN we would expect humans deprived of nature to undergo social, psychological, and physical breakdown How would we tell?

27 Three challenges How would we tell?

28  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness  Intensity of greenness  Proximity of trees and other green elements  Exposure to green views, places How would we tell? Three challenges

29

30 Robert Taylor Homes “low green” Robert Taylor Homes “high green”

31 Ida B. Wells “low green” Ida B. Wells “high green”

32  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness How would we tell? Three challenges

33  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness  Hold other variables constant How would we tell? Three challenges

34  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness  Hold other variables constant  Look for signs of social, psychological, physical breakdown How would we tell? Three challenges

35 Are green places and views essential to a healthy human habitat?

36 Overview of the Evidence

37 Social Breakdown Overview of the Evidence

38  Strength of community  Courtesy, mutual support  Supervision of children outdoors  Graffiti, noise, litter  Loitering, illegal activity  Property Crime  Aggression, violence  Violent Crime Social Breakdown Overview of the Evidence

39  Strength of community  Courtesy, mutual support  Supervision of children outdoors  Graffiti, noise, litter  Loitering, illegal activity  Property Crime  Aggression, violence  Violent Crime Social Breakdown Overview of the Evidence

40 Aggression, Crime Overview of the Evidence  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness:

41 Overview of the Evidence  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness: low vs. high green Aggression, Crime

42 Overview of the Evidence  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness  Hold other variables constant: Aggression, Crime

43 Overview of the Evidence  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness  Hold other variables constant:  randomly assign people to buildings  architecturally identical buildings  landscaping is not up to residents  check to see low and high green people are the same Aggression, Crime

44 Overview of the Evidence  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness  Hold other variables constant  Look for signs of social, psychological, physical breakdown: Aggression, Crime

45 Overview of the Evidence  Compare humans in conditions varying in greenness  Hold other variables constant  Look for signs of social, psychological, physical breakdown  self-reported aggression, physical aggression, violence, and severe violence  police crime data by address Aggression, Crime

46 Overview of the Evidence  Significantly more total aggression, physical aggression, violence, and severe violence in “low green” buildings  Aggression tied to mental fatigue  Significantly more total crime, property crime, violent crime in “low green” buildings –  Explains 7% of variance in crime Aggression, Crime

47  Strength of community  Courtesy, mutual support  Supervision of children outdoors  Graffiti, noise, litter  Loitering, illegal activity  Property Crime  Aggression, violence  Violent Crime Social Breakdown Overview of the Evidence

48 Psychological Breakdown Overview of the Evidence

49  Attention  Learning  Management of major life issues  Impulse control  Delay of gratification  Well-being (mood, life satisfaction)  AD/HD symptoms Psychological Breakdown Overview of the Evidence

50  Attention  Learning  Management of major life issues  Impulse control  Delay of gratification  Well-being (mood, life satisfaction)  AD/HD symptoms Psychological Breakdown Overview of the Evidence

51  Attention  Learning  Management of major life issues  Impulse control  Delay of gratification  Well-being (mood, life satisfaction)  AD/HD symptoms Psychological Breakdown Overview of the Evidence

52  Controlled field study:  guided walks in urban setting, residential setting, local park  objective measure of concentration  large differences in performance AD/HD

53 Overview of the Evidence  National survey  AD/HD symptoms after different activities in different settings  AD/HD symptoms in general  “green advantage” consistent across age, gender, size of community, part of the country, diagnosis AD/HD

54 Physical Breakdown Overview of the Evidence

55 Physical Breakdown  Poorer recovery from surgery  Self-reported physical health  Obesity in children  Mortality rates Overview of the Evidence

56 Physical Breakdown  Poorer recovery from surgery Ulrich 1984  Self-reported physical health Maas et al 2006; Mitchell & Popham 2007  Obesity in children Bell et al 2008; DeVries et al 2008; Liu et al 2007  Mortality rates Fukuda et al 2004; Mitchell & Popham 2008; Takano et al 2002a, b Overview of the Evidence

57 Humans in less natural environments show all the signs associated with unfit habitats: Overview of the Evidence Social breakdown Psychological breakdown Physical breakdown

58 The Evidence is Actionable

59 Diverse outcomes

60 Digit Span Backwards, SDMT, creativity, impulse control (Matching Familiar Figures, Category Matching, Stroop), delay of gratification, reaction times, aggression and violence, incidents of self- mutilation, psychological distress, life satisfaction, job satisfaction, residential satisfaction, mood, blood pressure, heart rate, ADHD symptoms, mortality, self-reported health, health symptoms, use of health care services, cardiac health, Beck Depression Inventory… Diverse outcomes

61 Diverse research designs and exposures to nature

62 window view from home (% natural), # trees in view from home, ecological restoration volunteering, gardening, recreational activities in nature, photos of nature, paintings of nature, nature sounds, videos of nature walks, actual nature walks, vacations in natural and other settings, “greenness” of residential landscape, %age natural in 1 km radius, #parks and public greenspaces in GIS, skyview occlusion… Diverse research designs and exposures to nature

63

64

65

66

67 Diverse populations

68 college sophomores, children 5-18 years old, older adults, much older adults, urban public housing residents, Americans, Japanese, Dutch people, individuals with ADHD, individuals with Alzheimer’s, children in residential treatment facilities for conduct disorders, incarcerated prisoners, cholecystectomy patients, urban, rural, suburban, small town residents … Diverse populations

69 What the evidence is telling us

70 Emergent Findings  How much greenness?  In what forms?  For whom? What the Evidence tells us

71 Emergent Findings  How much greenness? Every bit helps  In what forms? In (almost all) forms – but exposure is key  For whom? Everyone, especially the vulnerable “Vitamin G” What the Evidence tells us

72 Implications of nature as “Vitamin G”  Integrate nature into the urban fabric  At many scales and in many forms  With special attention to children, older adults, the poor

73 Trees and Public Health What do trees have to do with public health?  Nothing  Something  Everything

74 Nothing

75  They’re pretty  They cause allergies, drop limbs on people  Funding for greening is funding that could have gone towards health promotion Nothing

76 Something

77  They clean our air  They clean our water  They help prevent flooding  They reduce urban heat island effects  Parks support recreation Something

78 Everything

79  They are essential components of a healthy human habitat  They enable us to thrive – socially, physically, psychologically  Funding for greening is funding for health promotion Everything


Download ppt "Trees and Public Health: Growing a Healthy Human Habitat Frances E. (Ming) Kuo University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign CA Public Health, 2010."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google