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Partnerships, Alliances, and Coordination Techniques Fundamentals of Collaborative Leadership February 2008 Facilitated By: The National Child Care Information.

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Presentation on theme: "Partnerships, Alliances, and Coordination Techniques Fundamentals of Collaborative Leadership February 2008 Facilitated By: The National Child Care Information."— Presentation transcript:

1 Partnerships, Alliances, and Coordination Techniques Fundamentals of Collaborative Leadership February 2008 Facilitated By: The National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center (NCCIC) NCCIC Is a Service of the Child Care Bureau

2 Presenter

3 Today’s Agenda

4 Session Objective Participants will be able to… Identify and explore the fundamental concepts of collaboration, leadership, and collaborative leadership. Understand different leadership styles and how they relate to collaborative leadership. Identify and build skills that are necessary to become a collaborative leader. Explore and comprehend the six guiding principles of collaborative leadership.

5 PACT PACT is an initiative of NCCIC, a service of the Child Care Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services PACT gives State, Territory, and Tribal policymakers—particularly Child Care and Development Fund Administrators and their partners—the resources they need to build more comprehensive and collaborative early care and school-age programs for serving children and families

6 PACT Materials PACT Collaborative Leadership Strategies: A Guide for Child Care Administrators and Their Partners Web-based guide contains an introduction and six training modules: –Fundamentals of Collaborative Leadership –Creating, Implementing, and Sustaining Partnerships –Communication Strategies –Management Strategies for Successful Partnerships –Financing –Building Capacity to Evaluate Partnership Initiatives

7 Introduction and Purpose Introduction Collaborative Leadership is developed by a group that is partnering to solve agreed upon issues. Leaders of the group use supportive and inclusive methods to insure that those they represent are part of the change process. Purpose The purpose of the Fundamentals of Collaborative Leadership module is to share strategies, tools and resources to increase collaborative leadership capacity. (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p.25)

8 New levels of service achieved; agreements are established Independent agencies formally working together on some common goals Independent agencies exchanging information— networking Independent agencies building relationships and sharing information informally System Principles: Elements of Working Together Adapted from Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction and Great Lakes Resource Access Project

9 What is Collaboration? CoordinatingNetworkingCollaboratingCooperating (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, pp. 3-4)

10 Collaboration Pyramid Cooperation Coordination Collaboration Communication PACT 15 Note: Different authors use the terms “cooperation” and “coordination” interchangeably. This diagram follows the work of Sharon Lynn Kagan in defining the least intense level as cooperation. Used with permission.

11 Fundamental Concepts What is leadership? (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p. 8)

12 Leadership is….. A TRAIT and a PROCESS –Trait—the ability to exert influence and have others accept that influence producing change or performance Chrislip, Sweeny, Chritian, Olsen, 2002 Northcross, 1997 –Process—A process whereby an individual or small group influence others to achieve a common goal. (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p. 8)

13 Collaborative Leadership… –Is leadership shown by a group that is acting collaboratively to solve agreed upon issues –Has leaders who use supportive and inclusive methods to ensure that those they represent are part of the change process –Requires new notion of power…the more power that is shared, the more there is to use (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p )

14 What Makes Collaborative Leadership Different? UsualCollaborative Top down Few make decision Unilateral action Win or shift power Linear thinking Programs and products Charisma Persuasive Group falls apart if leader leaves Self governing Broad participation Guide and coordinate process Build relationships Systems thinking Process Vision Empathetic Group continues after leader leaves (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p )

15 Leadership Styles: Directing, Coaching, Supporting, and Delegating Directing: –Focuses communication on goal achievement –Gives instruction (what goals to achieve and how) –Spends limited time on supporting behaviors (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p. 13)

16 Leadership Styles: Directing, Coaching, Supporting, and Delegating Coaching: –Focuses communication on both goal achievement and people’s needs –Gives encouragement –Asks for input (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p )

17 Leadership Styles: Directing, Coaching, Supporting, and Delegating Supporting: –Does not focus just on goals –Focuses on tasks to be accomplished –Uses supportive behaviors to bring out others skills Listening Praising Asking for input Giving feedback (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p )

18 Leadership Styles: Directing, Coaching, Supporting, and Delegating Delegating –Offers less input and social support –Facilitates others confidence and motivation to do tasks –Leader not as involved in planning, details or goal clarification (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p )

19 Four Leadership Styles Supporting High supportive and low directive Coaching High supportive and high directive Delegating Low supportive and low directive Directing Low supportive and high directive Supporting Behaviors Directive Behaviors (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p. 14)

20 Who is a Collaborative Leader? Someone who safeguards and promotes the collaborative process (Collaborative Leadership, 2004a, p. 3)

21 Qualities of Collaborative Leaders –Acts maturely –Shows patience –Can learn from self reflection –Handles uncertainty –Tolerates uncertainty (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p. 27)

22 Qualities of Collaborative Leaders (Con.) –Has the ability to see problems from others’ points of view –Respects others’ experience or point of view –Has the ability to create a safe, supportive environment –Is comfortable communicating across organizational boundaries and with every part of the community (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p. 27)

23 Qualities of Collaborative Leaders (Con.) –Has the ability to create a shared vision –Knows the need for creativity –Constructively manage conflict, and The most important quality …. The Ability to Listen (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p. 28)

24 Six Guiding Principles of Collaborative Leadership 1.Assessing the Environment for Collaboration 2.Developing Clarity 3.Building Trust 4.Sharing Power and Influence 5.Developing People 6.Self Reflection (Collaborative Leadership, 2004h, p. 33)

25 Assessing the Environment Understanding the context for change before you act –The capacity to recognize and understand other perspectives –Facilitating connections and identifying clear and beneficial change for all participants –Setting priorities and identifying barriers and obstacles (Collaborative Leadership, 2004a, p. 5)

26 Assessing the Environment (con.) Increasing awareness of cultural perspective and how they effect the collaborative process (Collaborative Leadership, 2004b, p. 9)

27 Developing Clarity Definition - Being clear about the goals, direction, and envisioned future of a community for a particular issue. Outcome - Committing to a cause that transcends the self; recognizing ethical or moral standards that provide guidance. How - Integrating personal vision into a shared vision by finding common ground. Means - Mobilizing people through a shared vision and positive action and sustaining the vision in difficult times. (Collaborative Leadership, 2004d, p. 7)

28 Developing Clarity (con.) Current Reality Mobilization Identify Key Issues Develop Action Teams Develop Action Plans Implement Plans Evaluate Desired Future Shared vision Common values Environmental assessment (Collaborative Leadership, 2004d, p. 11)

29  Practice focused listening  Call each other by name  Clearly identify purpose for gathering  Let people know what is expected of them  Identify time frame team will work within  Balance process with product  Ensure everyone has an opportunity to speak  Use fair processes to get things done  Have diverse representation of types of people  Create working agreements Building Trust (Collaborative Leadership, 2004c, p. 9)

30 Sharing Power and Influence Developing the synergy of people, organizations and communities to accomplish goals (Collaborative Leadership. 2004k, p. 6)

31 Sharing Power and Influence (con.) Eight Sources of Power Position/Authority 1.Information and expertise 2.Control of rewards 3.Coercion 4.Alliances and networks 5.Access and control of agendas 6.Control of meaning and symbols 7.Personality (Collaborative Leadership, 2004k, p. 8)

32 Developing People –Bring out the best in others –Give up ownership or control –Maximize the use of other people’s talents and resources –Use mentoring and coaching to create power which increases leadership capacity –Build confidence by setting goals and receiving performance feedback (Collaborative Leadership, 2004f, p. 7)

33 A process in which an experienced individual helps another person develop his or her goals through a series of time-limited, confidential, one on one conversations and other learning activities. Usually relates to long term career development Developing People: Mentoring (Collaborative Leadership, 2004f, p. 8)

34 “ An activity that results in improvement, skills, capacity and performance.” Coaching is usually a short-term skill focused process Developing People: Coaching (Collaborative Leadership, 2004f, p. 9)

35 Asking the Right Questions at the Right Time Enhances Collaboration –Clarifying Questions –Discovery Questions –Open Ended Questions –Evocative Questions –Forwarding Action Questions Developing People (J. Astin, 1999)

36 Self Reflection The ability to analyze or examine in a serious way one’s experience and the ability to see how that experience impacts and shapes one’s relationships with others is a trait of individuals who develop effective leadership qualities and capacities. (Collaborative Leadership, 2004j, p. 6)

37 Emotional Intelligence Leadership Competencies –Personal Competence: These capabilities determine how we manage ourselves Self Awareness Self-Management –Social Competence: These capabilities determine how we manage relationships. Social Awareness Relationship Management (Collaborative Leadership, 2004j, p. 5)

38 Review

39 Closing Personal reflections Personal learning plan Quality improvement Session evaluation

40 Reflections I learned … I relearned … I will apply … I would like to know more about … I am surprised by …

41 Acknowledgements Astin, J. (1999). The Types of questions leader coaches ask.Retrieved March 14, 2008, fromhttp://www.coachinc.com/CCU/Become%20A%20Business%20Coach/Knowledge%20Base/Leader/default.asp?s=1#askhttp://www.coachinc.com/CCU/Become%20A%20Business%20Coach/Knowledge%20Base/Leader/default.asp?s=1#ask Collaborative Leadership. (2004a). Collaborative leadership: Assessing the environment: Facilitator’s guide. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004b). Collaborative leadership: Assessing the environment: Participant’s guide. Retrieved April 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004c). Collaborative leadership: Building Trust: Facilitator’s guide. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004d). Collaborative leadership: Creating clarity: Facilitator’s guide. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004e). Collaborative leadership: Creating clarity: Participant guide. Retrieved April 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004f). Collaborative leadership: Developing People: Facilitator’s guide. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004g). Collaborative leadership: Developing People: Participant guide. Retrieved April 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004h). Collaborative leadership: Fundamental concepts: Facilitator’s guide. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004i). Collaborative leadership: Self-assessment questionnaire. Retrieved April 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004j). Collaborative leadership: Self reflection: Participant’s guide. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004k). Collaborative leadership: Sharing power and influence: Facilitator’s guide. Retrieved April 14, 2008, from Collaborative Leadership. (2004l). Collaborative leadership: Sharing power and influence: Participant’s guide. Retrieved March 14, 2008, from

42 Thank you! Facilitated by the National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center Rosehaven Street, Suite 400 ● Fairfax, VA Phone: ● Fax: ● TTY: ● Web: PACT is an initiative of NCCIC, a service of the Child Care Bureau


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