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SAFETY MANAGEMENT MEETING November 1, 2004. Rutgers University 2003 Accident Data - All Campuses Incident Rate BLS - Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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Presentation on theme: "SAFETY MANAGEMENT MEETING November 1, 2004. Rutgers University 2003 Accident Data - All Campuses Incident Rate BLS - Bureau of Labor Statistics."— Presentation transcript:

1 SAFETY MANAGEMENT MEETING November 1, 2004

2 Rutgers University 2003 Accident Data - All Campuses Incident Rate BLS - Bureau of Labor Statistics

3 Accident Data All Campuses Recordable Accidents

4 Accident Data - All Campuses Lost Work Time Incidents

5 Accident Data – All Campuses Total Number of Days Away From Work

6 How do we compare? Rutgers (2003)(BLS) Educational Services (2002) Incident Rate Lost Time Rate

7 How do we compare? BLS Ed Services RutgersJ & J Lost workday case rate Severity rate

8 “Good is the enemy of great.” From the book “Good to Great,” Jim Collins

9 Why should we be great? Protection of our employees Cost of injuries, illnesses Reputation, university goal of excellence

10 Accident Data All Campuses Recordable Accidents

11 Accident Data - All Campuses Lost Work Time Incidents

12 Accident Data – All Campuses Total Number of Days Away From Work

13 Significant Accidents 2003/2004 DeptAcc. TypeContributing Factors InjuryLost Time Cost FOSFall from window sill Work platform, poor planning Multiple/ torn rotator cuff 159 LWD $56,000 Over Exertion Shoveling snowRuptured bicep 69 LWD 7 RWD $12,000 Struck by carFailure to obey traffic laws Mult injuries/ Internal 180 LWD $440,000 Over Exert. buffing floor Physical size, work/rest cycles Carpel tunnel53 LWD 16 RWD $11,000 Fall in closetElec cord in aisle Fractured foot 67 LWD$15,000 Fall - walk to dumpster Icy sidewalksFractured wrist 44 LWD 30 RWD $15,000

14 DeptAcc. TypeContributing Factors InjuryLost Time Cost RU - PD Fall – insp. of campus Icy sidewalks, nighttime Knee replacement 81 LWD$122,000 Fall – onto curb/ground Attention to surroundings Back surgery 62 LWD 20 RWD $131,000 AssaultWorkplace violence Torn rotator cuff 136 LWD $144,000 Dng Svcs Over Exert Kettles Repetitive stirring Torn rotator cuff 55 LWD 31 RWD $87,000 Fall – moving food cart Uneven/brick sidewalk Fractured hip 158 LWD $71,000 Significant Accidents 2003/2004

15 DeptAcc. TypeContributing Factors InjuryLost Time Cost HousingOver exertMoving heavy equip by self Torn rotator cuff 96 LWD$19,000 OtherFallWet floor at entrance Knee replacement 180 LWD $367,000 Fall down stairs Worn carpet/ handrails not used Fractured hip 113 LWD $115,000 Fall down stairs Damaged stairs Knee surgery 45 LWD 32 RWD $52,000 Significant Accidents 2003/2004

16 DeptAcc. TypeContributing FactorsInjury Outside Contractors Struck by wallImproper work procedures working by self/ site control Multiple internal Struck by pipe (18’ x 6” dia. cast iron pipe) Fall from truck Poor communication between employees Improper unloading techniques Head laceration Significant Accidents 2003/2004

17 Worker’s Compensation Costs DepartmentFiscal Year ClaimsLWTLWDIncurred Cost Facilities2003/ $423, / $1,122, / $521, / $1,484,000

18 Worker’s Compensation Costs DepartmentFiscal Year ClaimsLWTLWDIncurred Cost Dining2003/ $221, / $270, / $219, / $441,000

19 Worker’s Compensation Costs DepartmentFiscal Year ClaimsLWTLWDIncurred Cost Housing2003/ $255, /033011$87, / $399, / $220,000

20 Worker’s Compensation Costs DepartmentFiscal Year ClaimsLWTLWDIncurred Cost RUPD2003/ $350, / $355, / $119, / $104,000

21 “Greatness is not a function of circumstance. Greatness, it turns out, is largely a matter of conscious choice.” “Good to Great,” Jim Collins

22 Is “culture important?”

23 Columbia Shuttle Accident “In the boards view, NASA’s organizational culture and structure had as much to do with this accident as the external tank foam.” (Columbia Accident Investigation Board; Report Vol. 1, Chap. 7. August 2003)

24 Columbia Shuttle Accident NASA must be committed to: –A strong safety culture –A view that serious accidents can be prevented –A willingness to learn from mistakes & others –A realistic training program that empowers employees

25 Leadership for Safety

26 Leadership is at its best when: The vision is strategic; The results are tangible; The voice is persuasive. ( “The Leadership Moment” by M. Useem, 1998)

27 VISION FOR A SAFETY CULTURE Management is responsible, Everyone is accountable All incidents are preventable Training is critical Strive for continuous improvement Safety is good business

28 WHAT ARE THE RESULTS? Protection of our employees (OSHA triple bottom line) Compliance Cost savings (workers compensation, regulatory penalties)

29 ARE YOU PERSUASIVE? Discuss your expectations for safety performance Demonstrate good safety behaviors Audit your performance Review incident reports Have functional safety committees with employees at all levels.

30 People respect what management expects.

31 “There are going to be times when we can’t wait for somebody. Now, you’re either on the bus or off the bus.” (from the Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test by Tom Wolfe)

32 OSHA INITIATIVES Motor Vehicle Safety Construction Safety Voluntary Protection Program Partnerships

33 CURRENT ISSUES Air Permits –3 month lead time –New, modified equipment Stormwater –>5,000 ft 2 need permit, site controls –Management of leaves (collect/dispose off-site) –Backflow preventer on hydrants –No dumping cleaning buckets in storm drains

34 GLD (Radioactive sources) –Self-Illuminating exit signs SPCC –Updated plans/locations –New compliance binders for monthly inspections CURRENT ISSUES

35 Universal Waste –Standard collection dates/forms –Container management/labeling issues –Consumer electronics recycling day CERT –Contact James Zawistowski – RUPD CURRENT ISSUES

36 Good enough never is!


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