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 What do liquids and gases have in common? States of matter Do not have a fixed shape Ability to flow, particles can move past each other easily.

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Presentation on theme: " What do liquids and gases have in common? States of matter Do not have a fixed shape Ability to flow, particles can move past each other easily."— Presentation transcript:

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2  What do liquids and gases have in common? States of matter Do not have a fixed shape Ability to flow, particles can move past each other easily

3  Why doesn’t a rubber duck sink to the bottom of a bath tub?  A force pushes the rubber duck to the top of the water.

4  This force is an upward force that fluids exert on matter.  What keeps the ice floating?

5  The pressure exerted on the right is equal to the pressure exerted on the left. Theses forces cancel out.

6 Pressure increases as depth increases. Pressure increases Net force is upward (buoyant force)

7  The buoyant force on an object is an upward force equal to the weight of the fluid that the object displaces.

8  Change the shape of an object and you can change the density.

9  A solid brick’s density is 1.9g/cm3. And the density of water is 1.00g/cm3. How could you get the brick to float?

10  Where have you heard the word “pressure” in conversation?  Air pressure  Water pressure  Tire pressure  Blood pressure

11  When you pump up a bike tire, what is going on inside the tire?

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13  Pressure is calculated by using the equation below. pressure = Force area Pressure unit is pascal (Pa). It is equal to 1N/m 2

14  When you blow a bubble, you blow air in one direction. So why does the bubble get rounder as you blow, instead on longer? Fluid property : Fluids exert pressure evenly in all directions.

15  P 1 = P 2  So our equation can now look like this: F 1 = F 2 A 1 A 2

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18  Give an example of a moving fluid. air moving as wind water moving through pipes food coloring moving through water

19  Fluids move faster through smaller areas than through larger areas

20  How are honey and lemonade similar? How are they different?  Viscosity is a liquid’s resistance to flow. It is the attraction between the particles that make it viscous.

21  Think of 5 every day items that are viscous. Can you find a way to change their viscosity? Temperature

22  P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 T 1 T 2 The three laws we will look at take a variable out of this equation and hold it constant.

23  Boyle’s Law P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 Temperature stays constant, so we remove it from the combined gas equation. This was the marshmallow experiment.

24  Boyle’s Law – Pressure increases, volume decreases. They are inversely proportional.

25  Charles’ Law V 1 = V 2 T 1 T 2 Pressure stays constant Frozen balloon Room temp balloon

26  Charles’ Law

27  Gay-Lussac’s Law  P 1 = P 2 T 1 T 2 Directly proportional

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29  Charles’ Law If I have 45L of helium in a balloon at 298K and increase the temperature of the balloon to 328K, what will the new volume of the balloon be?

30  Charles Law I have 130L of gas in a piston at a temperature of 523K. If I cool the gas until the volume decreases to 85L, what will the temperature of the gas be?

31  Gay-Lussac’s Law 10.0 L of a gas is found to exert 97.0 kPa at 298K. What would be the required temperature to change the pressure to 101.325kPa?


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