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Tuesday/Wednesday Thursday/Friday

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Presentation on theme: "Tuesday/Wednesday Thursday/Friday"— Presentation transcript:

1 Copy Schedule in Planners Hand in periodic table worksheet for extra credit if it is finished.
Tuesday/Wednesday Thursday/Friday Notes on volume, graduated cylinder practice, graduated cylinder race, volume exit slip Homework: Volume Practice Discuss goals, Notes on states of matter, states of matter exit slip

2 Tuesday Oct 23 or Wednesday Oct 24
Do Now 1. Write the atomic mass of Helium as a whole number. 2. Helium has ____ protons. 3. Helium has ____ neutrons. Date Table of Contents Page Or Volume Whatever page you’re on

3 Today’s Plan Take notes on volume
Practice finding volume of liquids and rectangular objects Graduated Cylinder Race Volume exit slip Be able to apply the definition of volume Be able to read a graduated cylinder Be able to find the volume of a rectangular object Be able to find the volume of an irregular object

4 What do you already know about volume?
What is it? What units do you measure it in? What are some tools you can use to measure volume? Why is volume important?

5 Why is volume important?
You need to be able to find volume for your labs. If you cannot measure volume accurately your experiment results will be wrong.

6 Quick Review Matter is anything that has mass and takes up space.
Matter is made of atoms. Atoms are made of subatomic particles.

7 Quick Review The 3 subatomic particles are protons, neutrons, and electrons. Protons = positive Neutrons = neutral (no charge) Electrons = negative The number of protons in the nucleus (center of the atom) is what makes each thing in our world different.

8 Volume Notes Volume is the amount of space an object takes up.
All matter takes up space. Even gases have volume.

9 Quick Check What is volume? Does all matter have volume?

10 Volume Notes Volume is measured in these units: Liters (L)
Milliliters (mL) Cubic centimeters (cm3) 1mL = 1cm3

11 Quick Check What are the units you can use to measure volume?

12 Fill in the blank with “small” or “large”
An elephant has a ___________ amount of volume. A bug has a __________ amount of volume.

13 If someone said that a house was really big, does that mean it has a large or small amount of volume? How can you tell? If someone said that a ring was really small, what does that tell you about the volume? How can you tell?

14 Volume Notes The formula to find the volume of a rectangular object is length x width x height. V = l x w x h

15 Volume Notes What is the volume of the rectangular object?
V = l x w x h Length = 5cm Width = 2cm Height = 8cm 5 x 2 x 8 = 80cm3 8cm 2cm 5cm

16 What is the volume of the ice cube?
V = l x w x h Length = 3cm Width = 3cm Height = 3cm 3 x 3 x 3 = 27cm3 If an ice cube has a length of 3cm, a width of 3cm, and a height of 3cm, what is the volume?

17 What is the volume of the box
What is the volume of the box? V = l x w x h Length = 100cm Width = 50cm Height = 50cm 100 x 50 x 50 = 25,000cm3 Find the volume of the cardboard box below. 50cm 100cm 50cm

18 Measuring Volume We will be using graduated cylinders to find the volume of liquids and other objects. Read the measurement based on the bottom of the meniscus or curve. When using a real cylinder, make sure you are eye-level with the level of the water. What is the volume of water in the cylinder? _____mL What causes the meniscus? A concave meniscus occurs when the molecules of the liquid attract those of the container. The glass attracts the water on the sides. Top Image: Bottom Image:

19 Volume Notes Use a graduated cylinder to find the volume of a liquid.

20 Volume Notes Use these steps to read a graduated cylinder:
Put the GC on a flat, level surface Be at eye level with the surface of the liquid Read the mark closest to the bottom of the meniscus (curved part of the water).

21 Volume Notes Counting by 1s
When reading a GC, first identify what the cylinder is counting by. It might count by 1, 2, 5, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, or others Counting by 1s

22 6.6mL Counting by 0.2s 7.6mL 7mL What is it counting by?
What is the volume of the liquid? 6.6mL Counting by 0.2s 7.6mL 7mL

23 What is it counting by? 21mL 21.5mL 20.5mL 20mL
The short lines in between represent half of a milliliter. So it is counting by 0.5s 21mL 20.5mL 21.5mL 20mL

24 What’s the volume?

25 What is the volume of water in each cylinder?
37mL 52mL 23mL Images created at A B C

26 Volume Notes Measure the volume of an irregularly shaped object by using water displacement. Find the amount of water with the object and the amount of water without the object. Subtract those numbers to find the volume.

27 Amount of water with object: _____
Amount of water without object: ______ 5.6mL – 4.8mL = 0.8mL

28 Find the volume of the objects
Metal tube: = 10cm3 Ring: 68 – 64 = 4cm3

29 Add the word volume and the page number to your glossary.

30 Graduated Cylinder Race
What’s best for accurately filling a graduated cylinder?

31 Graduated Cylinder Race
In your lab book write: Graduated Cylinder Race IV: DV: Hypothesis:

32 Graduated Cylinder Race
What is my independent variable? What is my dependent variable? How can we measure that?

33 Graduated Cylinder Race
Write a good hypothesis for your experiment.

34 GC Race Procedure: 1. gather supplies:
1 pipette, 1 sponge, 1 beaker of water, 1 graduated cylinder 2. Test how long it takes to fill a graduated cylinder to exactly 9mL with a sponge. Record. 3. Test how long it takes to fill a graduated cylinder to exactly 9mL with a pipette. Record. 4. analyze your data in a table and graph it in a bar graph. 5. Write a conclusion about your results.

35 Decide what number you are at your table.
Create the table below in your lab book: Sponge Pipette Table 1 time Table 2 time Table 3 time Table 4 time Table 5 time Table 6 time Table 7 time Table 8 time Table 9 time Average:

36 Student 1 get supplies 1 pipette 1 sponge 1 beaker of water
1 graduated cylinder

37 Student 2 will be using the sponge to add water in the first trial.
Student 4 will check to make sure the measurements are EXACT and make sure everyone is following safety rules. Student 1 will raise his or her hand when the group is ready for the teacher to check and get the time. EVERYONE: record your time.

38 Student 1 prepare the materials for the next trial.
Put water beaker again. Wring out sponge. Order materials neatly.

39 Student 3 will add the water to the graduated cylinder with the pipette.
Student 1 will check to make sure measurements are EXACT and make sure everyone is being safe. Student 4 will raise his or her hand for the teacher to check and get the time. EVERYONE record your time.

40 Student 2 put away supplies carefully
Student 3 dry table

41

42 Graph your results Remember to have a title, x-axis label, y-axis label, and accurate intervals. Make a BAR GRAPH. Graph only the averages.

43 Needs to be at least 5 sentences!
Write a conclusion Remember to have A statement saying whether your hypothesis was right or wrong 3 supporting details (from your table or graph) a sentence summing up the results Needs to be at least 5 sentences!

44 Exit Slip Label your note card with your FIRST AND LAST NAME, DATE, and HOUR. Labeling this correctly is worth one point.

45 Exit Slip Clear everything off of your table. Close lab books and put them on the floor. NO TALKING, at all. If you have a question raise your hand SILENTLY and wait for the teacher. For multiple choice you can just write the letter of your answer. When you are measuring you need to write the number and the units.

46 Exit Slip 1. A student describes an object as being “very large.” This means the object has a) A high mass b) A high volume c) A low mass d) A low volume

47 Exit Slip 2. What is the volume of the rectangular object? Remember to write your units. 3cm 2cm 4cm

48 Exit Slip 3. What is the volume of the liquid in the graduated cylinder? Remember to include your units.

49 Exit Slip 4. What is the volume of the object in the graduated cylinder? Be careful about the units!!

50 Thursday Oct 25 or Friday Oct 26
Do Now: What is the volume of a box with a length of 5cm, a width of 6cm, and a height of 2cm? Give an example of something with a low volume. Date Table of Contents Page or Goal and States of Matter Whatever page you’re on

51 Review Volume

52 Review Volume

53 Review Volume

54 Review Volume

55 Review Atoms 1. What is an atom? 2. What makes up an atom?

56 Create this chart and fill it in
subatomic particle positive charge negative charge no charge inside nucleus outside nucleus Proton Neutron Electron

57 Today’s Plan Create our goals for this class
Read about the states of matter Take notes on the states of matter Short video clip on the states of matter States of matter exit slip Be able to describe the particle location and movement in a solid, liquid, and gas

58 Goals Why is it important to have goals in life?

59 Today we will be defining our individual goals so you can see why it is important to YOU to be successful in this class.

60 Complete your goal sheet one part at a time. Do not move ahead
Complete your goal sheet one part at a time. Do not move ahead. These will be hung around the room, so make sure they are very neat.

61 Fill in your name neatly. Think about your goal. DON’T WRITE IT YET.
Here are some goal options: My goal is to become a nurse. My goal is to be a pro football player. My goal is to have a lot of options when I graduate high school. My goal is to have my own business. My goal is to have a large family. Once you have your goal and how you want to phrase it, write it neatly on your sheet.

62 Explain why your goal is important to you. Examples:
My goal is important to me because I’m not sure exactly what I will want in the future, so I want to make sure I am able to do anything when the time comes. My goal is important to me because I have always wanted to be a nurse so I can help people. My goal is important to me because I love football and want to get paid for playing it.

63 Write at least 3 steps you’ll need to take to reach your goal.
Think about what steps you’ll need to take to reach your goal. Example: I need to try hard and keep focused on my goal. I need to pass all of my classes in middle and high school. I need to do volunteer work to develop and practice my skills. I need to get into a good college and pass those classes. I need to surround myself with people who help me achieve my goal instead of keep me from reaching it. Write at least 3 steps you’ll need to take to reach your goal.

64 Think about how this class helps you reach your goal. Example:
Being successful in 7th grade science helps me reach my goal because it gets me ready for all the science classes I’ll need to pass in the future. Being successful in 7th grade science helps me reach my goal by improving my problem solving skills so I am better prepared for challenges.

65 Think about how you, personally, will know that you have been successful in this class. What percent would you need to get to prove that you were successful and are ready to take the next step to reach your goal? Hints: Don’t choose 100% because even someone who knows a LOT about science can make a mistake or disagree with the answer to a question. Don’t choose anything under 60% because everyone in here is capable of getting a percent higher than that.

66 Anyone want to share your goal?

67 Make a KWL Chart in your lab book
Know Want to know Learned Fill in what you already Know about the states of matter. Then fill in what you Want to know about the states of matter.

68 States of Matter Reading
Read with your group. Write 1 or 2 sentences about the most important things to remember from each paragraph. After you’ve read, you should have between 7 and 14 sentences written in your lab book.

69 Matter Notes The 3 states of matter are solid, liquid, and gas.

70 Solids: Definite shape Definite volume
They keep their shape and volume no matter where you put them.

71 The cherries and the bagel kept their shapes in the container
The cherries and the bagel kept their shapes in the container. They would be the same size whether or not they were in the container. This makes them solids.

72 The particles in a solid are closely packed in a fixed position (which is why solids have definite shape and volume). The particles in a solid vibrate but don’t move from place to place.

73 Liquids: Definite volume No shape of its own
Spread into a puddle if they don’t have a container

74 These are liquids because they take up space, but they don’t have their own shape. Notice how they fill out in the container or spread if they don’t have a container.

75 The particles in a liquid are tightly packed, but they move around more than they do in a solid (which is why liquids don’t have their own shape). The particles in a liquid vibrate, move around, and slide past each other.

76 Gases: No definite shape No definite volume
This means the shape and size can change.

77 The hot air takes on the shape of the balloon
The hot air takes on the shape of the balloon. It can squeeze together to fill the balloon or it can spread out in the air outside of the balloon. Since it has no shape of its own and the size can change, hot air is a gas.

78 Gas particles can spread out or squeeze together to fill a container.
The gas particles vibrate and move freely at high speeds.

79 How can you tell which is a solid, liquid, and a gas?

80 Short Video Clip

81 Make a KWL Chart in your lab book
Know Want to know Learned Fill out the last column of the chart with what you Learned about the states of matter.

82 Add the words to your glossary with their page numbers.
Tape paper in lab book Add the words to your glossary with their page numbers. states of matter Solid Liquid gas

83 Exit Slip Label your note card with your FIRST AND LAST NAME, DATE, and HOUR. Labeling this correctly is worth one point.

84 Exit Slip Clear everything off of your table. Close lab books and put them on the floor. NO TALKING, at all. If you have a question raise your hand SILENTLY and wait for the teacher. For multiple choice you can just write the letter of your answer.

85 Exit Slip 1. What are the states of matter? Solid Liquid Gas
All of the above

86 Exit Slip 2. If you looked through a very powerful microscope, what would you see atoms doing in a gas? a) Bouncing and moving around freely b) Moving around a little bit and sliding over each other c) Packed tightly together with little movement d) None of the above

87 Exit Slip 3. Mrs. Thorsen asks you to reach inside a bag and take out an object. It feels hard and does not move under your touch. What could you say this object is for sure? a) A rubber ball b) A liquid c) Made of leather d) A solid

88 Exit Slip 4. Do the blue particles show you a solid, liquid, or a gas and how can you tell?


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