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BASIC NUTRITION Be Healthy. Stay Healthy. By: Bryan Weichelt Click the strawberry to continue.

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Presentation on theme: "BASIC NUTRITION Be Healthy. Stay Healthy. By: Bryan Weichelt Click the strawberry to continue."— Presentation transcript:

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2 BASIC NUTRITION Be Healthy. Stay Healthy. By: Bryan Weichelt Click the strawberry to continue

3 W HY K NOW A BOUT N UTRITION ? Live healthier. Be happier. Grow Stronger. Live Longer. Childhood obesity has become an increasing problem in the U.S. leading to low self esteem and depression and also can lead down a road to a possible struggle with diabetes, high cholesterol and/or high blood pressure. Learn what you can to put a stop to this problem and take a turn for a healthier future for our children and theirs. High cholesterol is directly linked to a plethora of health problems, one of which is heart disease.

4 W HY K NOW A BOUT N UTRITION ? HERE ARE SOME STAGGERING STATISTICS ABOUT HEART DISEASE (acquired from the Centers for Disease Control). Centers for Disease Control In 2006, 631,636 people died of heart disease. Heart disease caused 26% of deaths—more than one in every four—in the United States. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. Half of the deaths due to heart disease in 2006 were women. Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease. In 2005, 445,687 people died from coronary heart disease. Every year about 785,000 Americans have a first heart attack. Another 470,000 who have already had one or more heart attacks have another attack. In 2010, heart disease will cost the United States $316.4 billion. This total includes the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.

5 B ASIC N UTRITION Click on each food item below the pyramid to learn more!

6 P ORTION S IZES Your fist = 1 cup Your thumb tip = 1 teaspoon Deck of cards = 3 ounces meat Golf ball = ¼ cup dried fruit 6 dice = 1 ½ ounces of cheese Baseball = 1 medium apple or 1 cup Cupped hand = 1 to 2 ounces Tennis Ball = ¾ cup Computer Mouse = ½ cup Ping-Pong ball = 2 Tablespoons

7 C HANGE IN PORTION SIZES Source: National Institutes of Health As time passes our country becomes more educated about everything. For example, if you told someone that I would be taking a class online 20 years ago, they would ask you, what is online? So it seems, the smarter we get the less food we eat… wrong. Serving sizes have grown so rapidly and are still growing. This learning module is a very small step the strides we need to take to educate the country about what unhealthy food is doing to our bodies.

8 SODIUM IN YOUR DIET TIPS TO REDUCE SODIUM: Read the food label – an item of food should not contain more than 140mg (5% Daily Value) of sodium. Consume more fresh vs. processed foods Take away the salt shaker If you need to season, try herbs and spices for additional flavor. Cook with frozen vegetables vs. canned vegetables (frozen vegetables are typically picked at their nutritional peak then frozen within a matter of hours locking in those nutrients). Purchase and use low sodium products Too much salt (sodium) in your diet can lead to high blood pressure which puts you at risk for heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend less than 2,300mg (approx. 1 teaspoon) of sodium per day. Click on the picture below to find great salt alternatives! Source: Team Nutrition USDA

9 S ATURATED FAT & C HOLESTEROL TIPS TO REDUCE FAT & CHOLESTEROL: Start with low fat or fat free dairy products, such as skim or 1% milk. Omit butter and cream sauces on vegetables. Choose lean cuts of meat with minimal visible fat. Trim outside fat before cooking and remove skin on poultry. Prepare fish by baking, broiling or grilling rather than breaded or fried. Eat more fruits & vegetables in your diet – they are naturally fat free. The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend we eat less than 10% of calories from saturated fat and less than 300mg of cholesterol per day. Most Americans need to decrease their dietary intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol to reduce the risk of heart disease. Source: Team Nutrition USDA Click on the picture below to learn more on healthier cooking methods!

10 N UTRITION LABEL Source: American Heart Association For further details on the Nutrition Facts Label, please click on the label.

11 L ETS TAKE SOME TIME TO SEE WHAT YOU KNOW On the next pages you will find a quiz, this is for your benefit. Some answers you may know others you may not. There’s only one way to find out Take your time and review the information. This is a very basic quiz to give you a foundation for living a healthier life.

12 H OW MANY CALORIES EQUAL 1 POUND OF WEIGHT GAIN ?

13 S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here

14 G REAT J OB – 3500! If trying to lose weight, you need to burn more calories than you consume. To lose 1 pound per week you will need to decrease your weekly calories by 3500.

15 H IGH CHOLESTEROL LEVELS PUTS YOU AT AN INCREASED RISK FOR _____ Cancer Heart Disease Liver Disease Dementia

16 N OPE. S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here

17 T HAT ’ S RIGHT, HEART DISEASE ! According to the Centers for Disease Control heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US and people of all ages and backgrounds can get the disease.Centers for Disease Control Decrease your cholesterol and fat intake to reduce risk for heart disease.

18 W HICH TYPE OF MILK WOULD BE THE BEST CHOICE FOR AN ADULT ? 2% Milk Skim Milk Whole Milk Butter Milk

19 S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here

20 G REAT J OB, SKIM MILK IS THE BEST CHOICE FOR ADULTS ! TypeGrams of Fat Skim (fat free)< 0.5 grams 1% (low fat)2 grams 2% (reduced fat)5 grams Whole8 grams Buttermilk2 grams

21 H OW MANY MILLIGRAMS OF SODIUM EQUALS A ½ TEASPOON OF SALT ? 5 mg 600 mg 50 mg 1200 mg

22 S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here ?

23 Y ES ! 1200 MILLIGRAMS ! Remember, its recommended to not consumer more than 2300 milligrams for healthy adults.

24 A DECK OF CARDS EQUALS HOW MANY OUNCES OF POULTRY ? 1 oz 3 oz 2 oz 4 oz

25 N O S ILLY ! T HERE ’ S NO POULTRY IN A DECK OF CARDS However, the size of a deck of cards does represent approximately 3 ounces of poultry.

26 F OR A WELL BALANCED DIET HALF OF YOUR GRAINS SHOULD BE WHOLE GRAINS. TRUEFALSE

27 S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here

28 TRUE! At least half of you grains should be whole grain!

29 C ALCIUM HAS NO IMPACT ON TEETH AND BONE HEALTH. TRUEFALSE

30 S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here

31 CORRECT ! Calcium plays a key roll in teeth and bone health. Aim for your recommended milk intake to maximize bone growth.

32 I TS IMPORTANT TO EAT A VARIETY OF VEGETABLES RANGING IN DIFFERENT COLORS. TRUEFALSE

33 S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here

34 TRUE! Eating a variety of different colored vegetables provides you with important nutrients such as vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, folate and dietary fiber.

35 F RUITS TRUEFALSE Fruits provide important nutrients such as vitamin C, fiber, folate and potassium.

36 S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here

37 TRUE! By incorporating fruits into your diet, you will receive vitamin C, fiber, folate and potassium, all crucial to live a healthy life.

38 D RIED BEANS & PEAS CONTAIN A LARGE AMOUNT OF CHOLESTEROL AND SATURATED FAT. TRUEFALSE

39 S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here

40 C ORRECT ! Dried beans & peas contain no saturated fat or cholesterol. Consuming these are crucial for a heart healthy diet.

41 W HICH HAS MORE FIBER ? 1 whole medium apple, with peeling ½ cup applesauce 1 whole medium apple, without peeling ¾ cup 100% apple Juice

42 S ORRY T RY A GAIN Click Here

43 C ORRECT – 1 WHOLE APPLE WITH PEELINGS ! Apple TypeFiber (grams) 1 whole medium apple, with peelings 3.3 grams 1 whole medium apple, without peelings 1.7 grams ½ cup applesauce1.5 grams ¾ cup 100% apple juice0.2 grams The Institute of Medicine advises an Adequate Intake (AI) of 38 grams per day for men up to age 50 years old and 25 grams for females up to age 50 years old. (Source: Complete Food & Nutrition Guide Book)

44 C ONGRATULATIONS ! Y OU HAVE COMPLETED THE B ASIC N UTRITION LEARNING MODULE. Click the tomato to exit.

45 G RAINS Whole Grains contain fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Whole Grains may reduce the risks of several chronic diseases, including heart disease, and may also help to maintain a health weight. The 2005 dietary guidelines for Americans recommend that we consume at least half of our grains as Whole Grains. Click on the picture below to find out how many GRAIN servings you should have every day. What is a serving of Grain? ½ cup brown rice 1 slice of whole grain bread (1oz) ½ cup oatmeal 3 cups popcorn 5 whole grain crackers 1 cup whole grain cereal flakes All information on this slide, acquired from MyPyramid.govMyPyramid.gov Click here to go back

46 V EGETABLES Vegetables provide important nutrients including vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, folate and dietary fiber. Those who consume vegetables as part of a healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Aim for a wide variety of colorful vegetables every day. Each color offers different nutrients. Click on the picture below to find out how many VEGETABLE servings you should have every day. What is a 1 cup serving of Vegetable? 2 cups of raw spinach 1 cup baby carrots 1 large sweet potato All information on this slide, acquired from MyPyramid.govMyPyramid.gov Click here to go back

47 F RUITS Fruits provide important nutrients such as potassium, fiber, vitamin C and folate. They are naturally low in fat, sodium, calories and contain no cholesterol. People who consume a variety of fruits as part of a healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. It is important to consume a variety of fruits every week. Click on the picture below to find out how many FRUIT servings you should have every day. What is a 1 cup serving of Fruit? 1 cup sliced pineapple 1 small gala apple 1 cup strawberries 1 large (8” long) banana All information on this slide, acquired from MyPyramid.govMyPyramid.gov Click here to go back

48 M ILK Calcium is critical for healthy teeth and bones. Low fat and fat free milk provide the nutrients without a lot of saturated fat. 1 cup of whole milk contains 3 times as much saturated fat as the same amount of low fat milk (4.6 grams saturated fat in whole milk vs. 1.5 grams in low fat milk). Click on the picture below to find out how many MILK servings you should have every day. What is a 1 cup serving of Milk? 1 cup milk 8 oz yogurt 2 slices (3/4 oz) Swiss cheese 1/3 cup shredded cheddar cheese All information on this slide, acquired from MyPyramid.govMyPyramid.gov Click here to go back

49 M EATS AND B EANS Often referred to as the “stinky” group…. j/k. Dried beans and peas are an excellent source of plant protein, providing important nutrients (iron, potassium, folate and zinc), naturally low in fat and sodium and contain no saturated fat or cholesterol. Other great meat choices include: turkey, chicken, lean pork, lean beef (90%-95% lean) and venison. Click on the picture below to find out how many MEAT servings you should have every day. How much meat am I really eating? Poultry the size of a deck of cards is equal to 3 oz meat 7 medium shrimp equals 2 oz meat 25 almonds equal 2 oz meat 6 thin slices of ham equals 2 oz meat Below is an example of a 5oz steak All information on this slide, acquired from MyPyramid.govMyPyramid.gov Click here to go back


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