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1 The Criss Library at UNO An Introduction to Information Literacy and the Basics of Library Research

2 2 Table of Contents Part IIntroduction to Library Researchpage 7 Part IIThe Criss Library Homepagepage 38 Part IIIElectronic Indexes and Databasespage 67 Part IV The World Wide Webpage 136

3 3 Table of Contents Part I Introduction to Library Research at UNO Information Literacypage 7Information Literacypage 7 Define a Topicpage 11Define a Topicpage 11 Sources/Types of Informationpage 14Sources/Types of Informationpage 14 Characteristics of Information Sourcespage 20 Evaluation Criteriapage 32Evaluation Criteriapage 32 Back to Table of Contents

4 4 Table of Contents Part II The Criss Library Homepage Homepage Overview page 38Homepage Overview page 38 Access Toolspage 48Access Toolspage 48 Criss Library Catalogpage 49Criss Library Catalogpage 49 Search the University Library Catalogpage 52Library Catalogpage 52 Back to Table of Contents

5 5 Table of Contents Part III Electronic Indexes and Databases Overview of Electronic Indexes and Databases and Their Access Pointspage 67Databases and Their Access Pointspage 67 Academic Search Premierpage 79Academic Search Premierpage 79 Lexis Nexis Academicpage 99Lexis Nexis Academicpage 99 Locate Journals Servicepage 125Locate Journals Servicepage 125 A Brief Reviewpage 134A Brief Reviewpage 134 Back to Table of Contents

6 6 Table of Contents Part IV The World Wide Web The Pros and Conspage 136The Pros and Conspage 136 Evaluation Criteriapage 138Evaluation Criteriapage 138 Googlepage 140Googlepage 140 Advanced Searching and Evaluating the Resultspage 142and Evaluating the Resultspage 142 Back to Table of Contents

7 7 Introduction to Library Research and Information Literacy o This presentation will introduce you to the principles of information literacy and serve as a guide to the research process at the Criss Library at UNO. o This presentation will also provide an overview of the Criss Library Catalog, electronic indexes and databases, and the World Wide Web. Back to table of contents

8 8 What Is Information Literacy? The American Library Association defines information literacy as the set of skills needed to: Recognize the need for information Access appropriate resources Evaluate information/sources Use information effectively Understand ethical/legal restrictions

9 9 Why Is Information Literacy Important? To succeed in your classes at UNO To navigate the complex world of information To make the most effective and efficient use of your time in the library To improve and expand your research skills

10 10 Who Needs To Be Information Literate? We all do! Undergraduates Graduates Community members Faculty

11 11 Define a Topic Where do you begin? Your first step in beginning your research is to define your topic by asking yourself what it is that you want to write your paper about. Has there been a current news or radio broadcast that has caught your attention? Have you, your friends or family experienced something that you would like to write about? Back to table of contents

12 12 Define a Topic You’ve brainstormed and determined a subject that you’d like to write about. Now it is time to create an arguable thesis. An example from a first year English class: “Displays of the Ten Commandments in public buildings should be prohibited because they violate the separation of church and state.”

13 13 Define a Topic What are the key terms in this arguable thesis, and what is the order of importance? “Displays of the Ten Commandments in public buildings should be prohibited because they violate the separation of church and state.” “Ten Commandments” would be the main idea “Public buildings” would be second “Church and state” would be third “Violation” would be fourth Back to Table of Contents

14 14 Sources and Types of Information Now that you understand how to define a topic, we will examine which sources of information are best for finding the following types of information: Current Background Scholarly Opinion-based Statistical Back to Table of Contents

15 15 Which Sources are Best for Which Type of Information? Current refers to only the most recent developments on the topic, published within the last year or so. For current information, the best sources are: Journals Magazines Newspapers

16 16 Which Sources are Best for Which Type of Information? Background refers to general information, often brief, and with a historical perspective. For background information, the best sources are: Books

17 17 Which Sources are Best for Which Type of Information? Scholarly refers to the in-depth study of a subject or topic, peer-reviewed and scholarly. For scholarly information, the best sources are: Books Journals

18 18 Which Sources are Best for Which Type of Information? Opinion-based refers to a judgment by a person who may or may not be an expert on the topic; the bias of the author is used to sway the opinion of the reader. For opinion-based information, the best sources are: Magazines Newspapers The Web

19 19 Which Sources are Best for Which Type of Information? Statistical refers to numerical data that may be raw or analyzed (interpreted numbers). For statistical information, the best sources are: Sources specializing in statistics (i.e. the U. S. Census) Research studies Government documents

20 20 Characteristics of Information Sources We will now examine the various information sources and their characteristics. Books Journals Magazines Newspapers Government Documents Statistics World Wide Web Back to Table of Contents

21 21 Characteristics of Books Books can provide an in-depth treatment of a topic or an aspect of a topic. Books can also provide a broad overview or historical perspective on a topic. Books may not be as timely as the information found in magazines, journals or other periodicals.

22 22 Characteristics of Periodicals The word “periodical” refers to items that are published “periodically.” Journals, magazines, and newspapers are all examples of periodicals. Let’s look at each type of periodical separately. Journals Magazines Newspapers

23 23 Characteristics of Periodicals Journals Journals are published more frequently, and the information is more current than that found in books. Journals are sometimes referred to as scholarly, peer- reviewed, or refereed journals; they are written to present results of research or thorough study of a topic. Journals usually contain fewer commercial advertisements than popular magazines. Articles are often lengthy (7-10 pages or more) and are usually written by the person who conducted the research.

24 24 Characteristics of Periodicals Journals (continued) Articles published have been evaluated by an editorial board of experts before they appear in print. Sources of information are always indicated in some manner, whether it be footnotes, endnotes, works cited page, or a bibliography. Articles may contain charts, tables and/or graphs. Journals may be published monthly or quarterly.

25 25 Characteristics of Magazines Magazines Also known as popular magazines as they are designed to appeal to a broad audience. Usually printed on glossy paper and may contain many advertisements. May include opinion and/or current events.

26 26 Characteristics of Magazines Magazines (continued) Articles usually less than 5 pages in length. Usually do not include bibliographies. Published very frequently, often weekly.

27 27 Characteristics of Newspapers Newspapers Provide the most current information of the three types of periodicals. Published daily or weekly. Not considered as scholarly as a journal article

28 28 Characteristics of Newspapers Newspapers (continued) Intended to communicate the news rather than provide in-depth research. Considered a “primary source” as events are recorded /reported at the time they occur. Present information in a short, concise manner.

29 29 Characteristics of Government Documents Government Documents Are items published under the authority of a governmental agency. Can be considered primary source material. Can be produced at local, state, and federal government levels – municipal (city), county, state legislature, or federal agencies such as the U. S. Congress or Department of Education.

30 30 Characteristics of Statistical Information Statistical Information Contains data that may be presented in the form of tables or charts and may not include narrative passages. Are often compilations of data from a variety of separate resources. Currency of the data varies depending upon the source of the data. End of Part I Back to Table of Contents

31 31 Characteristics of the Web World Wide Web Offers a variety of current, historical, research, secondary, and primary information. Currency of the information depends upon the author of the page or site–-some are updated daily, while others are not kept up-to-date. Accuracy/Authority always in question.

32 32 Evaluation Criteria Consider these points when evaluating books, periodicals, articles, web pages, newspapers, etc. Accuracy Authority Objectivity Currency or Timeliness Coverage or Scope http://www.virtualchase.com/quality/criterial_print.html Back to Table of Contents

33 33 Criteria for Evaluating Information “Accuracy describes information that is factually irrefutable and complete.” “Consider the editing and publishing policy of the source: Is it peer-reviewed?” You should be able to verify factually correct information. “Are there two or more reliable sources that provide the same information?” http://www.virtualchase.com/quality/criterial_print.html

34 34 Criteria for Evaluating Information “ Authority refers to the expertise or recognized official status of a source.” “Consider the reputation of the author and the publisher.” “When working with legal or government information, consider whether the source is the official provider of the information.” “Authors recognized as experts amongst their peers are usually cited and reviewed in the literature” and should be verifiable. http://www.virtualchase.com/quality/criterial_print.html

35 35 Criteria for Evaluating Information “Objectivity is the bias or opinion expressed when a writer interprets or analyzes facts.” Is the author using persuasive language? Is the author presenting other viewpoints, providing the reader with a balanced point of view? Is the reason for presenting the information clear? Is something being advertised? Is the author wanting to influence change? http://www.virtualchase.com/quality/criterial_print.html

36 36 Criteria for Evaluating Information “Currency or timeliness refers to information that is current at the time of publication.” “Consider publication, creation, and revision dates”-- are they apparent in the information? “Beware of Web site scripting that automatically reflects the current day’s date on a page.” http://www.virtualchase.com/quality/criterial_print.html

37 37 Criteria for Evaluating Information Coverage or scope “refers to the extent to which a source explores a topic.” “Does the information cover the period of time of interest to you?” What is included? “What is excluded?” http://www.virtualchase.com/quality/criterial_print.html

38 38 The Criss Library Homepage The Library homepage URL is http://library.unomaha.edu/ http://library.unomaha.edu/ You will find links to: Research Tools Services Collections About the Library Help Ask a Librarian Start of Part II Back to Table of Contents

39 39 The Library Homepage: Layout and Services The library homepage includes function buttons for Research Tools, Services, About the Library, Help, Ask a Librarian, and the Library Catalog.

40 40 Link to Research Tools Click the Research Tools function button to search the Library Catalog, find articles in databases, use the Locate Journals service, use the Research Wizard, search area library catalogs, and access SCOLA, etc.

41 41 Link to Services — Organized by Patron Type Click here for information about Services. The information is organized by patron type. Select your patron type to find information about a variety of Criss Library services.

42 42 Link to Collections Click here to learn more about the various Criss Library Collections, such as the Afghanistan Collection, University Archives, etc.

43 43 About the Library About the Library will provide “nuts and bolts” information including library hours, maps, parking, contacts and library directory, etc.

44 44 Help Link The Help page will provide an FAQ link for more information about library services and resources, as well as directions, maps and parking information.

45 45 Ask a Librarian Reference Service 24/7 You can ask reference questions any hour of the day or night. This page will provide information on how to call us, ask by email, or ask via Instant Messaging (IM) via Meebo.

46 46 The Library Catalog Links Click the Library Catalog links to search for items held in the library’s collection. Select the Advanced Catalog Search link for more precise results.

47 47 Key Access Points for Beginning Research The library homepage includes access points to the Library Catalog, Databases, Locate Journals service, and the Internet. The following slides will help you navigate these links and services.

48 48 Access Tools What is an access tool? An access tool is used to locate different types of information. We will examine four access tools: Criss Library Catalog (for books, journals, media, etc.) Indexes or Databases (for scholarly, peer-reviewed and other articles) Locate Journals service (to find full-text access to articles in print or electronic sources) Search Engines (ex. Google for web sites) Back to Table of Contents

49 49 The Criss Library Catalog Let’s start our investigation of access tools with a look at the Criss Library Catalog. The Criss Library Catalog is the tool that will help you find the items held in our collection: Books Periodicals Media (music CD’s, DVD’s, videos) Reference materials Government Documents Back to Table of Contents

50 50 The Criss Library Catalog The Library Catalog will tell you: What materials we hold in our collection Where the item is located in the library What the status of the item is – available, checked out, reserve, library use only, etc. What periodicals are on the shelves (and sometimes, links to electronic databases that index that periodical)

51 51 The Criss Library Catalog A word about periodicals Remember that the Library Catalog will tell you what periodicals we subscribe to in print (sometimes including an electronic link to a database), but to get at the citation or content of the journals, you must look in a print or electronic index.

52 52 Search the University Library Catalog Search options include: Quick Search – keyword Advanced Search – Boolean operators, truncation, and proximity Journal Title Subject – Library of Congress Subject Headings Author Title Other search options – LCSH, SuDocs, etc. Back to Table of Contents

53 53 Quick Search Click on the Advanced Catalog Search link for more options. Type your search term here to perform a quick keyword catalog search from the library omepage.

54 54 Advanced Search Other options include searching by title, author, subject, journals, reserves and databases. Advanced searching helps you retrieve more precise results by combining terms with Boolean operators, such as AND, OR or AND NOT. It also allows for searching by material type, location, language, date range, etc.

55 55 Advanced Search: Boolean Operators Boolean operators are used to narrow or expand searches. They include the words, AND, OR, and AND NOT. AND “AND" narrows searches Example: love and marriage results will show only items with both terms in search fields

56 56 Advanced Search: Boolean Operators Boolean logic is used to narrow or expand searches. OR “OR" expands searches Example: love or marriage Results will show items with either term in search fields Parentheses can be used around Boolean operators to group similar concepts. Example: (college or university)

57 57 Advanced search: Boolean Operators Boolean logic is used to narrow or expand searches. AND NOT “AND NOT" removes terms Example: love and not marriage results will show items with "love" that do not refer to "marriage”

58 58 Advanced Search: Truncation Truncation Allows asterisks to the right of a word fragment: One asterisk will look for 1-5 more characters Two asterisks will look for as many letters as necessary to complete the word Examples: indiv* will find individual indiv** will find individual, individualism, individuality, etc.

59 59 Advanced Search: Proximity Proximity Two ways to find words near each other: Use "near" to find words in any order Example: church near state Use “within #” to find words within a specified number range Example: Church within 3(#) words of State would retrieve results with the words church and state in any order within 3 words of one another.

60 60 Search the Criss Library Catalog Books Books may provide a more in-depth or historical understanding of the topic but may not be as current as a journal article. Circulating books are shelved on the third floor. Reference books are shelved behind the reference desk.

61 61 Search the Criss Library Catalog Periodicals Refers to items published “periodically” such as: Journals Magazines Newspapers Formats for periodicals might include: Microfiche or microfilm Print Electronic

62 62 Search the Criss Library Catalog Media Other materials are held in the library besides books and periodicals. The Criss Library has a musical score collection, a video/DVD collection, and a CD collection. The Archives and Special Collections also has materials related to UNO history and other specialized collections for use in the library.

63 63 Search the Criss Library Catalog Reference Materials The Reference Department holds materials that are non- circulating but are for use in the library. Dictionaries, encyclopedias, reference volumes, almanacs, print indexes, and other items are available here.

64 64 Search the Criss Library Catalog Government Documents The Criss Library is a designated depository of materials printed by the U. S. Printing Office. Items are located on the first floor, and most documents may be checked out just like books. Items declared “non-circulating” include certain reference items (e.g. decennial census summary reports or special collections materials such as the Congressional Record).

65 65 Search for Reserves and Electronic Reserves Reserves and Electronic Reserves Your instructors may place items on reserve for your class, which means they are set aside in some manner to allow for convenient access for your class. Items may be held at the Circulation Desk or placed on E-reserves--an electronic link available to you via a password that your teacher should provide.

66 66 Search for Reserves and Electronic Reserves End of Part II Back to Table of Contents Services Click on the Services function button to find materials placed on Reserve. Select your “patron type” (ex. UNO Student) and scroll down the page until you find Reserves & Electronic Reserves. Reserve materials may be in print, electronic, or streaming audio format and may be searched by course name or instructor.

67 67 Electronic Indexes and Databases The Criss Library Catalog vs. Electronic Indexes and Databases We mentioned earlier that the Library Catalog provides information on the journal holdings in our collection but not on the specific content of the journals. To access the content of journals, we must search in a electronic database or in a print or electronic index. Start of Part III Back to Table of Contents

68 68 Electronic Indexes and Databases The Library Homepage provides several access points for locating databases. The Alphabetical List in the catalog is one option. You may also search in the section Find Articles in Databases either by subject or full list. You may also click on the Top 10 Databases list.

69 69 Access Points for Electronic Indexes and Databases by subject link Find databases using the library catalog.

70 70 Access Points – Database Links Several options for locating databases by title are available through the Criss Library Catalog, including an alphabetical list, a subject list and the new Top 10 Databases list.

71 71 Access Points – by Subject Click on this drop-down menu to search for a database by the subject or discipline.

72 72 Access Points – by Subject A new option exists for locating databases by subject or discipline through the Criss Library Catalog. I’ve selected History as my subject area or discipline and a list of apro- priate databases is provided. Each database has a description with dates of coverage.

73 73 Access Points – by Subject After clicking on the subject list for History, you will find the list of suggested databases recom- mended for research in history.

74 74 Access Points – by Subject List By clicking on the link to the database JSTOR, you will be directed to the JSTOR homepage.

75 75 Access Points – by Alphabetical List By typing in the letter “h” on the alphabetical list, you will be directed to the database names that begin with the letter “h”.

76 76 Access Points – by Top 10 Databases Click on these links to search through an abbreviated list of the ten most frequently accessed databases at the Criss Library. EBSCO’s Academic Search Premier and Lexis-Nexis Academic are listed here.

77 77 Electronic Indexes and Databases The Criss Library subscribes to over 100 electronic indexes and databases. The Criss Library has databases that provide a general overview of a broad range of topics as well as some that are more subject specific and in-depth. We will examine two general databases: Academic Search Premier for journal articles and Lexis Nexis for newspaper articles. Back to Table of Contents

78 78 Electronic Indexes and Databases Academic Search Premier and Lexis Nexis Academic We will now focus our attention on two important databases: Academic Search Premier for journal articles Lexis Nexis Academic for newspaper articles

79 79 Electronic Indexes and Databases Academic Search Premier Academic Search Premier is the world’s largest academic multi-disciplinary database. Academic Search Premier provides full text for nearly 4,700 publications, including full text for more than 3,600 peer-reviewed journals.

80 80 Electronic Indexes and Databases Academic Search Premier PDF back files to 1975 or earlier are available for well over one hundred journals, and searchable cited references are provided for more than 1,000 titles. This database is updated on a daily basis via EBSCOhost.databases provided to us through EBSCO.

81 81 Academic Search Premier: How to Access It Academic Search Premier To access Academic Search Premier from the library homepage, select one of the following access points: Alphabetical List Subject List Top 10 Databases List

82 82 Academic Search Premier: Several Access Options Click on “A” in the Alphabetical List, to find the link for the database Academic Search Premier.

83 83 Academic Search Premier: Several Access Options Click on “E” for EBSCO in the Alphabetical List to find the vendor for the database Academic Search Premier.

84 84 Academic Search Premier: Several Access Options By clicking on the link to EBSCO Connect, you will find Academic Search Premier listed as the second option under all EBSCO Indexes.

85 85 Academic Search Premier: How to Access Click here to access Academic Search Premier.

86 86 Academic Search Premier: The Interface The EBSCO interface: notice the database name. Type your search terms here.

87 87 Academic Search Premier: A Sample Search Type your search terms here.

88 88 Academic Search Premier Searching in Academic Search Premier As you see in the previous search, I used the terms, “church,” “state,” and “ten commandments.” The Boolean operators are already set as a default to “AND.” The following screen will show other search options.

89 89 Academic Search Premier: Search Options Notice search field options

90 90 Academic Search Premier: Boolean Operators Notice Boolean operators (and, or and not) to refine your search.

91 91 Academic Search Premier: Limiting Results Local Titles means UNO subscribes to the journal. Full Text means either links to full text, or HTML and/or PDF documents available. Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals means you are selecting research articles.

92 92 Academic Search Premier: Limiting Results Academic Search Premier search hints Your instructor will often ask that you find “peer- reviewed,” “scholarly,” or “research” articles. Academic Search Premier allows you to limit your results to include only the “scholarly” (peer-reviewed) journals. You may also see the distribution of articles retrieved from the different categories of periodicals-- “Academic Journals,” “Magazines,” and “Newspapers.”

93 93 Academic Search Premier: Periodical Options You may click on either periodical option to limit your results to that type of periodical (academic journals, magazines or newspapers.

94 94 Academic Search Premier: Available Full Text Formats This record shows the article is available in three formats: Linked Full Text, HTML Full Text, and PDF Full Text. Clicking on the UNO Subscribes link will show the Library Catalog record.

95 95 Academic Search Premier: Available Full Text Formats HTML Full Text The HTML Full Text option will be a text version of the document but is not a scanned image of the original. HTML Full Text files are smaller than PDF documents and require less memory if e-mailing or saving to a disk or other storage space.

96 96 Academic Search Premier: Available Full Text Formats PDF Full Text The PDF version is a scanned image of the document. The item will appear just as it looks in the original print journal or magazine. PDF files are large and require a lot of memory. PDF files require Adobe Reader to open.

97 97 Academic Search Premier: Available Full Text Formats UNO Subscribes: The UNO Subscribes link indicates that the Criss Library subscribes to this journal in print, and the link will direct you to the Library Catalog record. It does not guarantee that the volume/issue you are seeking is available as the subscription may have stopped. It is important that you note the date, volume, and issue numbers of your citation in order to determine if the library holds the item you need.

98 98 Academic Search Premier: Evaluating Your Result List Academic Search Premier results What can you tell about the results retrieved in this search? Are they relevant to the topic? Are they current? What types of journals are they appearing in? Scholarly? Popular? Newspapers? What about the author’s bias? Is it apparent?

99 99 Electronic Indexes and Databases Lexis Nexis Academic This database includes nearly 5,000 publications including newspapers, newsletters, magazines, wire services, federal and state court opinions, federal and state statutes, federal regulations, law reviews and SEC filings. Lexis Nexis indexes the Omaha World-Herald. Lexis Nexis is primarily full-text. Back to Table of Contents

100 100 Electronic Indexes and Databases o Lexis Nexis Academic To access Lexis Nexis from the library homepage, select one of the following access points: Alphabetical List Subject List Top 10 Databases List

101 101 Lexis Nexis: How to Access Click on the letter “L” to access Lexis Nexis Academic from the Alphabetical List.

102 102 Lexis Nexis – How to Access Click here to access Lexis Nexis Academic from the Alphabetical List. Notice other Lexis Nexis options.

103 103 Lexis Nexis – How to Access Click here to access Lexis Nexis from the Top 10 Databases list.

104 104 Lexis Nexis: The Interface The Lexis Nexis interface

105 105 Lexis Nexis: Power Search Click here for Power Search. The Power Search option will allow us to refine our search strategy to retrieve more relevant results.

106 106 Lexis Nexis: A Sample Search Power Search page

107 107 Lexis Nexis Use Lexis Nexis Power Search for more targeted searching: Lexis Nexis requires that you complete three steps. Enter search terms (terms and connectors or natural language) Select sources Specify dates

108 108 Lexis Nexis: Search Options Enter search terms here

109 109 Lexis Nexis: Search Options To find out more about connectors, click on the View Connectors link. It will describe how to refine your search using terms like and, or and “and not” (Boolean operators) as well as other ways to retrieve the most relevant results.

110 110 Lexis Nexis: Search Options Select from the list of available search options. Clicking on the View Connectors link will pull up this page. It explains how to develop a search strategy. You can review Boolean Searching (and, or and “and not”) and learn about other proximity commands that may help you refine your search.

111 111 Lexis Nexis: Search Options Click on the link Add keywords (Index Terms) to find the most appropriate terms for your search.

112 112 Lexis Nexis: Search Options Click on Add keywords (Index Terms) to see how the keyword or keywords you selected are categorized in Lexis Nexis. The categories are Company, Industry, Subject, and Geography with a default of All terms. When I type in the word “Church,” I retrieve companies with the name “Church,” affiliated church industries, and the subject heading “church” including a link for “Church and State”.

113 113 Lexis Nexis: Search Options The drop-down menu allows you to select from the list of available source options including local, regional, national and international news and wire services.

114 114 Lexis Nexis: Search Options Select a specific date or date range to narrow your search. You may search for items published as recently as today, or as far back as the late 1970’s.

115 115 Lexis Nexis: A Sample Search I entered the search terms, “church,” “state,” and “ten commandments” from U.S. Newspapers and Wires within the previous month.

116 116 Lexis Nexis: A Sample Search Clicking on the link Show will allow you to select what section of the document will be searched, such as body, headline, dateline, etc. This is useful when you need to broaden or narrow your result list.

117 117 Lexis Nexis: A Result List Here is a sample document result list. Clicking on the drop-down menu will allow you to select other viewing options. They include List, Expanded List, Full Doc- ument, Full with Indexing, KWIC and Custom. (Custom will not be covered in this presentation.)

118 118 Lexis Nexis: Expanded List Option An example of the Expanded List option.

119 119 Lexis Nexis: Full Document Here is the full text of an article.

120 120 Lexis Nexis: Full with Indexing Notice the search terms appear in red in the article. This happens when we Select the options Full Document and Full with Indexing.

121 121 Lexis Nexis: KWIC Option Select KWIC to see keywords In context.

122 122 Lexis Nexis: Delivery Options Lexis Nexis provides several delivery options. Lexis Nexis allows you to print either citations or full articles. Lexis Nexis allows you to e-mail citations or full articles. Lexis Nexis allows you to save citations or full text articles. Lexis Nexis allows you to export bibliographic references to Refworks.

123 123 Lexis Nexis: Delivery Options By clicking on the different icons, you can print, e-mail, save or export bibliographic references.

124 124 Lexis Nexis: Print Option Click on the print icon and a new window opens to prepare your print job.

125 125 Lexis Nexis: E-mail Option Click on the e-mail icon and a new window opens to allow you to send the document or citation via e-mail.

126 126 Lexis Nexis: Save Option Click on the save icon and a new window opens to allow you to download the document or citation.

127 127 Lexis Nexis: Export Bibliographic Citation Option Click on the book icon and a new window opens to allow you to directly export your citation into Refworks.

128 128 Locate Journals Service Another service the Criss Library provides is the Locate Journals service. Locate Journals shows where journals are available full-text (electronically or in print). Locate Journals allows you to Search for journal titles Determine if journals are available electronically and/or in print Determine if and where journals are available in full text

129 129 Locate Journals Service Back to Table of Contents Enter a journal name to find out where the journal is available in full text. You may search by title, ISSN number, alphabetically, or by Subject.

130 130 Locate Journals Service: A Sample Search Note the default selection option, “Title begins with.” I have typed in the search box the search terms, “Church and State.”

131 131 Locate Journals Service: A Result Page Our search using the default selection option, “Title begins with” and the search terms, “Church and State,” retrieved one record. We can see from the record that the item is available in the Criss Library Catalog and from 06/01/1996 to present in the electronic database Academic Search Premier.

132 132 Locate Journals Service: A Sample Search Locate Journals may be searched by known or unknown titles In the previous search, I typed in the terms “church and state,” and one journal appeared in my result list. Note that coincidentally, Church and State is also the actual name of a journal. You may type in a known title or words of a title as well. Locate Journals will tell you where the journal is indexed and in what format(s) it is available.

133 133 Locate Journals Service: A Result Page Note the coverage dates When you select the option, Title contains all words, and you type in the words, “Church and State,” you retrieve two results. The first journal title is Church & State and the second is the Journal of Church and State. Although these titles are similar, they are different journals. Note that they are both available from the Criss Library and Academic Search Premier but only Journal of Church and State is available through WilsonOmniFile Full Text Select.

134 134 Locate Journals Service: A Result Page When you select the option, Title equals, and type in the words, “Church and State,” you retrieve one result for the journal title Church & State. Avoid ampersands when you are creating a search string.

135 135 Locate Journals Service: A Result Page 0009-6334 This record provides the journal Information for Church & State.

136 136 Locate Journals Service: Full Text Access Link Result page for the electronic version of the journal Church and State indexed in the data- base, Academic Search Premier. Notice the option to search within a particular publication issue.

137 137 Locate Journals Service: Print Holdings Access Link The result page for the print version of the journal Church and State in the Criss Library Catalog.

138 138 A Brief Review Library Resources So far, we have looked at the Criss Library Catalog, Electronic Indexes and Databases, and the Locate Journals Service. These resources are helpful for finding books and periodical articles in journals and newspapers. Back to Table of Contents

139 139 A Brief Review (continued) Library Resources The Criss Library subscribes to electronic resources that we access through the Internet. These resources are paid for with student fees and other funding and are not available remotely to people unaffiliated with UNO. What is contained within the indexes has been handpicked by the index providers and may have originated in print format. End of Part III Back to Table of Contents

140 140 World Wide Web: Pros and Cons What is the World Wide Web? The pros… The World Wide Web is made up of billions of web pages on a very wide variety of topics. The Web can be a good source of information for some topics and some types of information, particularly current information. Start of Part IV Back to Table of Contents

141 141 World Wide Web: An Introduction What is the World Wide Web? The cons… The World Wide Web is not the best source for all information. Anyone can create and post Web pages on anything s/he wants whether they are an expert in the field or a fifth grader. No one is monitoring the credibility or accuracy of the information posted.

142 142 World Wide Web: Evaluation Criteria In addition to the previously discussed evaluation criteria-- accuracy, authority, objectivity, currency/timeliness, and coverage/scope, remember to consider closely the following points: Audience – Who is the intended audience--a student, a political party member, a consumer, someone familiar/unfamiliar with the topic? Purpose – Why has this page been created--promotion, commerce, scholarly work, personal expression, other? Back to Table of Contents

143 143 World Wide Web Search Engines A search engine is a tool primarily used to locate information on the Web. Similar to the indexes we looked at earlier, search engines can be general or subject-specific.

144 144 World Wide Web: Google We will now take a moment to look at a few sites that might relate to the topic of “separation of church and state and the ten commandments in public buildings.” We’ll use Google for our search. We’ll skip to the Advanced Search option. Our initial search terms will be “church and state” and “separation” and “ten commandments.” Back to Table of Contents

145 145 World Wide Web: Google Skip this interface page and click on the Advanced Search Interface page.

146 146 World Wide Web: Google’s Advanced Search Page Find results by entering search terms or phrases here – notice your choices. Back to Table of Contents

147 147 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search A sample search

148 148 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results Notice the URL of each result. Does it indicate a possible bias? In this search, many of the URL’s have a religious or political tag indicating a possible bias in the content. Be aware of this!

149 149 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results Notice the URL of each result. What is the domain name in the URL? Is it a.com site., a.org site, a.gov site, a.net site? What does that tell you? Here is an example of a pbs.org site, a news site for public broadcasting. Be aware of this!

150 150 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results Here is the pbs.org site. What do you notice in this site? Is there any indication of the author or publisher of the site? What about the accuracy, authority, objectivity, currency, coverage purpose and audience?

151 151 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results The site is presenting an interview with Judge Roy Moore, the Alabama judge who was removed from office for defying a federal court ruling to remove the monument of the Ten Commandments from the courthouse.

152 152 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results The site is also presenting an opposing side to Judge Roy Moore, the Reverend Barry Lynn, from the group Americans United for the Separation of Church and State.

153 153 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results Scrolling down the pbs.org site, the site lists the financial sponsors, another helpful piece of information in evaluating the point of view of a site. How would you evaluate this site?

154 154 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results Here is another site with the URL: http://www.biblelight.net/bill-of-rights.htm Does the URL provide a clue to the content? From what you see here, what can you find out about the author of this site?

155 155 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results Understanding the limits of a Power Point presentation, what else can you learn about this site from what you see here? Remember to consider the purpose, authority, scope and audience as you research sites.

156 156 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results To find the author for this site, I had to scroll down to the bottom of the page. Does the author appear to be a scholar? A student? A politician? A citizen?

157 157 World Wide Web: Google Advanced Search Results Here is the author’s home page. How would you evaluate whether to use this site in your Research?

158 158 World Wide Web No single Power Point presentation can illustrate the complexities of evaluating the vast amount of material on the web. You now have criteria to consider that will help you make sense of it. Remember: Accuracy, Authority, Objectivity, Currency, Coverage, Audience and Purpose

159 159 Conclusion This presentation has guided you through the library resources by type and access tools available to you for your research. Our hope is that you will become critical and confident users of information. GOOD LUCK! For more information or assistance, contact the Criss Library Reference Desk at (402) 554-2992 End of Part IV End of Presentation Back to Table of Contents


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