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Who’s Who? Kim Ferguson, Director of Student Support Services and College and Career Readiness Rebecca Rider, Director of Special Education Beth Lambert,

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Presentation on theme: "Who’s Who? Kim Ferguson, Director of Student Support Services and College and Career Readiness Rebecca Rider, Director of Special Education Beth Lambert,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Who’s Who? Kim Ferguson, Director of Student Support Services and College and Career Readiness Rebecca Rider, Director of Special Education Beth Lambert, Student Support Team (SST) and 504 Facilitator Dr. Margaret Kidder, Coordinator of Psychological Services Deborah Somerville, Coordinator of Health Services 1

2 Our Objectives: Discuss the continuum of support in BCPS for students with ADHD and executive functioning needs Share strategies and supports

3

4 ADHD Defined ADHD is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by a pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity- impulsivity that is present prior to age 12 years, in two or more settings, where the symptoms interfere with, or reduce the quality of, social academic, or occupational functioning. American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, VA , American Psychiatric Association, 2013.

5 ADHD Diagnoses Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Combined Type
Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Predominantly Inattentive Type Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Predominantly Hyperactive- Impulsive Type

6 Executive Functioning Defined
Executive Functioning involves the use of higher level cognitive functions to select and achieve goals, or develop problem solutions, such as: Planning Organization Time Management Working Memory Metacognition

7 Executive Functioning Defined
Executive Functioning also includes cognitive functions that guide our behavior in order to reach goals and problem solutions, such as: Response inhibition Emotional control Sustained attention Task initiation Flexibility Goal directed persistence Dawson, Peg, and Guare, Richard, Executive Skills in Children and Adolescents: A Practical Guide to Assessment and Intervention, Second Edition, New York: The Guilford Press, 2010.

8 Prevalence Approximately 11% of children 4-17 years of age (6.4 million) have been diagnosed with ADHD as of 2011 as reported by parents The percentage of children with an ADHD diagnosis continues to increase, from 7.8% in 2003 to 9.5% in 2007 and to 11.0% in 2011 Boys (13.2%) were more likely than girls (5.6%) to have ever been diagnosed with ADHD 1 in 5 high school boys 1 in 11 high school girls Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

9 Prevalence The average age of ADHD diagnosis was 7 years of age, but children reported by their parents as having more severe ADHD were diagnosed earlier Prevalence of ADHD diagnosis varied substantially by state, from a low of 5.6% in Nevada to a high of 18.7% in Kentucky Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

10 Prevalence In Maryland, parents reported approximately 11.8% of children have been diagnosed with ADHD by a health care provider at one point in time In 2011, 8.9% of children in Maryland had current ADHD reported by parents ---a decrease from 9.1% in 2007 5.8% of children in Maryland were reported to be taking medication compared to 6.1% nationally Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention

11 Multi-Disciplinary Task Force
In 1999, BCPS assembled a multi- disciplinary task force, including parents and community members, to address the issue of ADHD and learning

12 Goals of the Task Force Develop processes to better screen, identify, and intervene with students exhibiting behaviors of inattention, hyperactivity and/or impulsivity Maintain students who exhibit behaviors of inattention, hyperactivity and/or impulsivity in general education Reduce the number of inappropriate referrals to IEP Teams for special education services for students with ADHD Differentiate instruction to meet the learning needs of students with ADHD Provide resources for students, families, and school staff Strengthen the collaboration with parents while improving outcomes for students

13 ADHD Identification and Management Guide
Purposes: Provide an outline of the SST process for supporting students Provide information for teachers and staff in meeting the needs of students Promote collaboration between school staff and parents in the use of evidence-based interventions that support student behavior and student achievement in the school setting

14 ADHD Identification and Management Guide
August First edition of the guide Revisions in 2001, 2006, and 2012 More broadly accepted NICHQ Vanderbilt Assessment Scale (VAS) replaced DuPaul-IV in the 2012 edition of the guide as the screening tool used in schools

15 Access to ADHD Identification and Management Guide
Click on “Our System” Click on “Offices” Click on “Student Support Services” Go to “Manuals” on bottom left side bar

16 Behavioral/ Social/ Emotional Skills
A Continuum of Support Frequency, Intensity, Duration Tier 3: Intensive Interventions Tier 2: Targeted Interventions Academic Behavior Organization of materials Time management Work Completion Tier 1: Prevention and Early Intervention Behavioral/ Social/ Emotional Skills Academic Skills Instructional Practices and Interventions

17 Teacher Level Teams Review observable and measurable data to help clarify the concern, set a goal, and identify an intervention Collaborate with the parent Implement individual interventions consistently for approximately days Maintain observable and measurable data to periodically monitor the student’s response

18 The Facts First grader struggled with following classroom routines and expectations Did not complete classwork consistently or accurately Left homework materials at school Struggled with using and managing materials and physical space Often could not keep hands and feet to self Few positive peer relationships

19 Turn and Talk!

20 Problem Solving Teacher met with school counselor and parent
Implemented a system of visual cues for basic classroom routines Parent and teacher developed a consistent method for monitoring homework and student progress Provided extra space and opportunities for movement within the classroom

21 Problem Solving Set a timer with specific goals for work completion paired with a brief break to engage in preferred activity Provided positive reinforcement and social acknowledgement when goals were met Provided leadership roles Counselor met with the student and a few friends several times in a lunch bunch group to teach and reinforce specific social skills

22 Positive Outcomes Student is completing work
Has established several positive peer relationships Able to follow morning and afternoon routine as well as classroom expectations without direct teacher support

23 Behavioral/ Social/ Emotional Skills
A Continuum of Support Frequency, Intensity, Duration Tier 3: Intensive Interventions Tier 2: Targeted Interventions Academic Behavior Organization of materials Time management Work Completion Tier 1: Prevention and Early Intervention Behavioral/ Social/ Emotional Skills Academic Skills Instructional Practices and Interventions

24 Student Support Team (SST)
General education, problem solving team Addresses the complex needs of students who have not adequately responded to classroom- based interventions matched to individual needs over time Reviews any relevant information and data regarding behavior, learning, and response to interventions provided by teachers, parents, and health care providers

25 Student Support Team (SST)
May request the Vanderbilt Assessment Scale (VAS) for screening of inattentive, impulsive, and/or hyperactive behaviors Results of the VAS may be used to develop a SST Plan, which is a general education intervention plan

26 Elementary SST Plan Example

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28 Secondary SST Plan Example

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30 Who Can Diagnose ADHD? ADHD may be diagnosed and documented for educational purposes in BCPS by the following qualified professionals: Licensed Physician Licensed Nurse Practitioner Certified School Psychologist Licensed Psychologist

31 Section 504 Section 504 is a federal civil rights statute that protects students with disabilities from discrimination Schools and institutions that receive federal funding must provide eligible students with disabilities equal opportunity to participate in all academic and non academic services the school offers Students who are eligible receive instruction through the general education curriculum Schools must also provide appropriate accommodations based on individual needs

32 Who’s Eligible? Student must have a:
Documented physical or mental impairment Substantial limitation to one or more major life activities Decisions about 504 eligibility should be made without considering the effects of mitigating measures, such as: Medication Assistive Technology Other reasonable accommodations

33 504 or IEP for ADHD Section 504 IDEA Functional definition
Thirteen disability categories Formal assessments are not generally necessary Specific evaluation procedures General education with accommodations Specialized instruction and supplementary aids and services Periodic review Annual review General educator is generally the case manager Special educator is generally the case manager

34 The Facts Intermediate student struggled with organization and completion of assignments Diagnosed with ADHD SST considered 504 eligibility and developed and implemented a 504 Plan SST met again to determine additional supports due to a decline in classroom performance and behavior

35 Turn and Talk!

36 Problem Solving SST considered accommodations to address the amount of work and type of assignments that were “essential” for grading Incorporated morning “check in” with homeroom teacher and afternoon “check out” with last period teacher Used “outside the box” thinking to provide non traditional instruction

37 Problem Solving (Cont’d)
Implemented a “negotiation” strategy for teachers and student to set specific and agreed upon goals for work completion Peer support for agenda and materials (“Buddy Checks”) Provided teachers professional development specific to the student’s learning characteristics and best practices

38 Positive Outcomes Student appears motivated by use of technology and the non traditional classes Teachers and students regularly negotiate and develop short term goals for work completion Overall grades have increased when compared to last year Positive working relationship between teachers, students, and parents

39 Strategies and Supports
Organization and Planning Check in/check out Agenda assistance Use of electronic calendars Dropbox for assignments

40 Strategies and Supports
Work Completion Prioritize “essential” assignments that demonstrate mastery of concepts/skills and must be graded Provide alternative ways to respond for written assignments when appropriate Reduce the amount of work, but not complexity of the assignment

41 Strategies and Supports
Attention to Task Utilize auditory signals such as a timer set to random intervals Shorten work periods to coincide with student’s length of attention and pair with movement breaks Technology

42 Strategies and Supports
Memory Daily student checklists for routines, materials, tasks to complete, etc, Pair written and oral instructions with a visual cue to help with retrieval of information Use device to take pictures of important information

43 Strategies and Supports
Impulse Control Pre-corrections Private cuing and conferencing Daily progress sheets Supervise students closely during periods of transitions

44 Strategies and Supports
Control of Motor Activity Provide structured breaks Planned, purposeful movement Fidgets Use of word processing device for assignments and note-taking

45 Strategies and Supports
Social/Emotional Needs Morning, mid-day, afternoon check ins Teach and reinforce self-regulation strategies Teach and reinforce emotional regulation strategies Cool down zones Social stories Meet with school counselor one-on-one or in groups

46 Teacher Training New Teacher Training Countywide Training
School-Based Training Training for individual teachers as follow-up to specific cases

47 Turn and Talk In your group, discuss the following:
What’s working at home and school Personal success stories

48 Contact Information OFFICE PHONE Student Support Services and College and Career Readiness Special Education Psychological Services Health Services

49 Thank You!


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