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Oakland/East Bay Math Circle 1.Choose a number. Circle it. Cross out all of the numbers in the same row and same column as the number you chose. 2.Choose.

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Presentation on theme: "Oakland/East Bay Math Circle 1.Choose a number. Circle it. Cross out all of the numbers in the same row and same column as the number you chose. 2.Choose."— Presentation transcript:

1 Oakland/East Bay Math Circle 1.Choose a number. Circle it. Cross out all of the numbers in the same row and same column as the number you chose. 2.Choose a number that is not circled or crossed-out. Circle it. Cross out all the numbers in the same row and the same column as the number you chose. 3.Continue the same process of circling and crossing out numbers until there is only one number left. Circle it. 4.Add the six-circled numbers. 5.Choose different numbers and compare the sthe first. Were they the same, or different?

2 Presented by Brandy S. Wiegers Director, Oakland/ East Bay Math Circle

3 What is a Math Circle? Started in Eastern Europe Students + Professional Mathematicians Tuesday, Point Loma Room, 7-9 PM aaahhaa- inspiring mathematical experience community of peers to explore mathematics

4 Overview Oakland/ East Bay Math Circle Activities –Success –Lessons Learned Teachers’ Circle Questions/ Comments

5 Why Oakland/ East Bay?

6 Oakland/ East Bay Math Circle Approach Teacher Based Approach Middle & High School Students Laney College in Oakland Monday meetings, 1 hour

7 Data on Attendance Total student participants in the program : 40 Average weekly student participants : 20 Total teacher/ administrators who have attended the OEBMC Program : 11 Total teacher/ administrators who completed the week-long Summer Teachers’ Circle Program : 11 Average teacher/ administrator participants : 6/7 Total number of schools participating : 8

8 Diversity of Students Sex-Ratio of Students Male : 55 % Female : 45 % Age Totals of Students Middle school (6th-8th grade): 33 (82.5 %) High school (9th -12th) : 6 (15 %) Other (5th grader) : 1 (2.5 % ) Visual Diversity Data of Students Asian: 35 % African-American: 23 % Latino/ Hispanic : 15 % Caucasian : 10% Unknown : 17 %

9 OEBMC Instructors Yaim Cooper, University of California, Berkeley. Charles Crissman, University of California, Berkeley. Yvonne Lai, University of California, Davis. Ezra Gouvea University of California, Davis. Dr. Michael Orkin, Dean of Mathematics, and Sciences at Laney College. Thomas Rike, Retired Mathematics Instructor, Oakland High School. Dr. David G. Ross, Instructor and Chair of Mathematics Department at Laney College. Emily Peters, University of California, Berkeley. Peter Tingley, University of California, Berkeley. Brandy Wiegers, University of California, Davis. Tom Davis, San Jose Math Circle Dr. Tatiana Shubin, OEBTC Director, Professor of Mathematics, San Jose State University. Dr. Zvezdelina Stankova,Berkeley Math Circle Director, Associate Professor at Mills College and UC Berkeley. Joshua Zucker, OEBTC Director, Castilleja School.

10 Overview Oakland/ East Bay Math Circle Activities –Success –Lessons Learned Teachers’ Circle Questions/ Comments

11 Fall 2007 OEBMC Program Students Criss-Cross Probability Mathematics of Origami King Chickens Definitions & Algorithms Population Dynamics Laws of Chance Teachers Math Games (TC) Winning Game Strategies One Player Games(TC) Mobius Strips Geometric Topology Definitions & Algorithms Laws of Chance

12 Criss-Cross - 1st Day of Class An exciting game of skill and strategy! Add two to seven additional points anywhere inside the dotted triangle game board. Players alternate turns drawing a single straight line joining any two points, as long as the segment does not pass through any other points or segments already appearing on the game board. The winner is the last player able to make a legal move. From Sam Vanderveld’s Circle in a Box lectures

13 Criss-Cross - 1st Day of Class An exciting game of skill and strategy! Add two to seven additional points anywhere inside the dotted triangle game board. Players alternate turns drawing a single straight line joining any two points, as long as the segment does not pass through any other points or segments already appearing on the game board. The winner is the last player able to make a legal move. From Sam Vanderveld’s Circle in a Box lectures V = 5 E = 9 F = 6

14 Criss-Cross - 1st Day of Class Lessons Learned: Create the Right Tone- Interactive, Mathematics Future Instructors From Sam Vanderveld’s Circle in a Box lectures

15 Probability 1/2 and 1/2: 1/2 the class got it, the other 1/2 are continuing not to get it Lessons Learned: Understanding what they cover in the curriculum Preparing instructors for students

16 Mathematics of Origami

17 The students FAVORITE set of lessons Lessons Learned Interactive Built on a promise for ninja-stars

18 King Chickens Understanding Relationships Lessons Learned: Probability Returned! Student Enrollment Decreased

19 Algorithms & Definitions Quadratic Formula Lessons Learned: Personal Relationships & Stories- Instructors Relating to the students

20 Mobius Strips AAHHAA Moment “This is so cool- watch this!”

21 Population Dynamics “Rabbits are going to take over the world and make us their pets!” Lessons Learned: Building on Research & Other Resources DO NOT do it alone!

22 Laws of Chance, Airplanes & Winter Activity Book Lessons Learned: Using the Resources of Laney College Listening to the Students Retention

23 Return to Probability

24 2008 Magic Box 1.Choose a number. Circle it. Cross out all of the numbers in the same row and same column as the number you chose. 2.Choose a number that is not circled or crossed-out. Circle it. Cross out all the numbers in the same row and the same column as the number you chose. 3.Continue the same process of circling and crossing out numbers until there is only one number left. Circle it. 4.Add the six-circled numbers. 5.Choose different numbers and compare the sthe first. Were they the same, or different?

25 Preparing for Spring Courses –Teachers –“Green Students” –“Yellow Students” Instructors

26 Overview Oakland/ East Bay Math Circle Activities –Success –Lessons Learned Teachers’ Circle Questions/ Comments

27 Tom Davis, 1:30 Wednesday

28 Teachers’ Circle Year Long Math Circle Program Paid to bring students weekly Receive SJSU course credit for attending monthly 3 hour sessions at Oakland or San Jose + Summer Program Summer Program Throughout the Bay Area Live on campus at UCB, attend classes at MSRI Morning, afternoon & evening classes taught by local mathematicians Paid

29 Teacher Diversity Data Summer Teachers’ Circle Program Teachers/ administrators invited: 17 Total teacher/ administrators who completed the week: 11 Total number of schools who sent participants: 12 OEBMC Program Total teacher/ administrators who have attended: 11 Total number of schools participating : 8

30 OEBMC Teacher Diversity Data Total teacher/ administrators who have attended: 11 Average teacher/ administrator participants : 6 Total number of schools participating : 8 Total number of schools regularly sending students : 5 Sex-Ratio of Participants Male : 36 % Female : 64 % Teaching Focus of Participants Middle school (6th-8th grade): 73 % High school (9th -12th) : 18% Other : 9%

31 My thanks to our sponsors Stephen D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation The Simons Foundation The Firedoll Foundation Laney College Mathematical Sciences Research Institute Oakland Unified School District

32 Thank You! Brandy Wiegers National Association of Math Circles Tuesday, 7-9pm, Point Loma Room

33 What brought me to Oakland? Former UC Davis Explore Math Coordinator Oakland/ East Bay Math Circle Director MSRI National Math Circle Coordinator


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