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The Nuts & Bolts of Developing a Fundraising Plan Oklahoma Museums Association November 6, 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "The Nuts & Bolts of Developing a Fundraising Plan Oklahoma Museums Association November 6, 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Nuts & Bolts of Developing a Fundraising Plan Oklahoma Museums Association November 6, 2008

2 Source: The Fundraising School, 2002

3 Mission statement Goals Objectives Programs & Services Finances Governance Staffing Facilities & service delivery Planning & Evaluation History Case resources document the following aspects of the organization:

4 Developing The Case

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6 In making the transition from building the internal case to developing external case, the focus is on answering the following questions:

7 Steps to Developing a Fundraising Plan Step #1Determine Your Budget Step #2List Your Prospects Step #3Define Your Campaign Step #4Define Your Fundraising Methods

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10 Fundraising Plan Outline Case for Support Staffing Prospects Gift Range Table Timeline Role & Authority of Volunteer Leadership Campaign Materials & Communication Gift Counting & Recognition Budget

11 Case For Support Definition—The Case for Support is the set of carefully prepared reasons why the institution merits financial support, including its resources, needs, potential for greater service and future plans. Included for this campaign is a strategic plan to thoroughly renovate the existing space in the W. Don Beaver Science Building, while also constructing a new teaching, research and laboratory space by the year Gifts will be sought to fund construction of a new 28,000 square foot laboratory complex adjacent to the existing science facility. Plans have been drawn for a new two story structure that will house eight teaching labs, faculty/student research labs and support space. 1. Description$7,000, PurposeScience Laboratories Initiative (Science Building expansion) 3. See Appendix I for the full Case for Support.

12 Staffing A. Advancement Staff Organization & Execution 1. Size The effectiveness of the Campaign will depend upon staffing. The leadership and volunteers of the Science campaign will need to have the full-time assistance of the most experienced and able staff available. All of the present development officers of the University will be involved in the operation of the Campaign. Among the officers who will have key responsibilities for the leadership and major gifts part of the campaign are: Major Gift Officers (Gresham, Alexander, Crabtree, Martin) Call Matrix/Pace 15 face-to-face in 60 day season (Alexander, Crabtree, Martin) Determine Major Gift Officer Portfolio: 75 or 150 (determine place of stewardship/maintenance of existing prospects). There will be weekly development meetings (President attending monthly). 2. Job descriptions Job Descriptions exist for the Vice-President, Assistant to the President for Endowment Dev. & Planned Giving, and the Executive Director of Development. It is recognized as we move forward that SNU is moving toward a sustaining model for fundraising. As such, ongoing planning for effective staffing is necessary. Among the future anticipated growth points is a need for a full-time Corporate and Foundation Relations officer. This person would facilitate and significantly prepare foundation proposals at a pace unprecedented for our institution and be SNU’s face to the corporate community. B. Other staff roles 1. President – The role of the President in the campaign is crucial. As the University’s most effective and articulate representative, it will be essential for him to be involved in certain key negotiations in the early stages of the Campaign and for closing on some prospect solicitations as the Campaign moves through its various phases. 2. Provost – Must be available for advice and counsel on Campaign matters as they relate to the faculty and academic planning. 3. Select science and nursing faculty -- Active leadership of the Science faculty will be essential, as well as participation in the solicitation of lead gifts as requested.

13 Staffing (contd.) B. Other staff roles 1. President – The role of the President in the campaign is crucial. As the University’s most effective and articulate representative, it will be essential for him to be involved in certain key negotiations in the early stages of the Campaign and for closing on some prospect solicitations as the Campaign moves through its various phases. 2. Provost – Must be available for advice and counsel on Campaign matters as they relate to the faculty and academic planning. 3. Select science and nursing faculty -- Active leadership of the Science faculty will be essential, as well as participation in the solicitation of lead gifts as requested.

14 Realities of a gift range table – Projected gifts of these amounts will be needed $7 Million Gift Table ProspectsGiftsAveragingEqualingTotaling 31$1,000, $500,000$2,000,000$3,000, $250,000$1,250,000$4,250, $100,000$1,000,000$5,250, $50,000$ 750,000$6,000, $25,000$ 625,000$6,625, $10,000$ 300,000$6,925,000 Many <$10,000$ 75,000$7,000, Loren GreshamDavid AlexanderJohn MartinMichael Crabtree Major Gifts AlumniSNU FundPlanned Giving Comm & MktFoundationsEndowment Dev 4. Stewardship, gift recognition, and appropriate signage (see Appendix III)Prospects

15 Prospects A. Requirements Realities of a gift range table – Projected gifts of these amounts will be needed: $7 Million Gift Table B. Prospect Identification – Among an identified pool of 358 alumni prospects, we believe there to be approximately 20 identified and viable potential donors of $100,000 or above whose first giving priority with SNU is the Sciences. 1. Prospecting Because the overall number of prospects needed is not sufficient, prospect identification and rating will be vital to the success of the campaign. It is recommended that of the various methods proposed for rating, the individual one-on-one method be used predominately. 2. Database analysis and electronic screening – At the time of A Transforming Vision, an extensive electronic screening was conducted with an outside vendor, P!N. 3.Field research -- One-on-one individual prospect rating. 4.Surveying – A decision needs to be made as to whether or not we are going to survey our 3,000 science alumni to secure employment information from them and to assess their perceptions of our institutional needs for improved equipment and facilities. C. Research 1. Priority – Working within constraints of limited time, resources and staff, every effort will be made to be sure we choose prospects carefully for additional research. 2. Policies and procedures – Major gift prospecting is a “sights-raising” search for giving potential. Potential is an indication of a person’s capacity to give, not to be confused with prosperity, which is a factor of interest and our ability to cultivate and to sell the program. 3. Security – With respect to donor research, we embrace the confidentiality statement of the Association of Professional Researchers for Advancement (APRA): “Confidential information about constituents (donors and non-donors), as well as confidential information of the institutions in oral form or on electronic, magnetic, or print media are protected in order to foster a trusting relationship between the constituent and the institution. This means that the information is not available for anyone except development professionals, and their agents, to see.” D. Portfolio Management The portfolio and prospect management program is managed on behalf of Southern Nazarene University by the Office for University Advancement, in accordance with its designation by the SNU Board of Trustees as the officially designated fundraising office for Southern Nazarene University. The Vice-President for University Advancement, in consultation with the President, has ultimate administrative authority for the program, including formulations and revisions of the Campaign Plan and Case for Support. 1. System design a.) Qualification/Initial Contact/Discovery b.) Relationship Building c.) Cultivation d.) Solicitation e.) Stewardship 2. Data tracked – Information will be tracked through call reports placed in the Actions Tab of Raisers Edge; names of peer reviewers will be captured and kept on RE files. Within 48 hours after a donor call, the development officer will: a) Place a single sentence summary on RaisersEdge highlighting the call; b) Prepare a call report on the G drive with a more complete call description and a listing of next intended action; c) Notify the Director of Advancement Services that the reports are completed.

16 Campaign Timeline Broad Outline of Solicitation Activity A. Planning Phase Draft Preliminary Timetable Conduct campaign feasibility study Build Major Gift Prospect Lists; Research SNU Relationships Develop Communications and Marketing Plans Begin Case Stating Process Develop Staff Organization Plan and Campaign Budget Begin Corporate and Foundation Advance Gifts Efforts (Ron Mercer) Begin Soliciting Leadership Gifts. B. Leadership Gifts and Leadership Recruitment Phase 1. Organization – Development staff 2. Goal -- $4 million 3. Strategy a.) Fall 2007—Solicit Leadership Gifts b.) Winter Solicit $100,000 Gifts; Identify OKC community prospects; Recruit, select volunteers for rating/soliciting. c.) Conduct Prospect Screening and Rating Process d.) Spring Produce campaign newsletter

17 Campaign Timeline C. Major Gifts Phase 1. Organization – Development staff with very limited volunteer assistance 2. Goal -- $2 million 3. Strategy 4. Prospects – Analyze survey information for proposed implementation. D. Public Phase and Special Gifts Plan 1. Organization – Staff with limited faculty and staff and other volunteer support a.) Public Kickoff Event–January Goal -- $1 million 3. Strategy a.) Continue Adding Names to Major Gifts Prospect List b.) Continue Prospective Donor Contact and Cultivation as Required c.) Summer 2008—Solicit $25,000 Gifts d.) Continue corporate and foundation solicitations e.) Fall Public/Grassroots f.) Continue Distribution of Campaign Information to News Media and Prospects g.) Continue to Organize and Train Limited Volunteer Leadership h.) Ongoing recognition of Donors of Major Gifts i.) Campaign Victory Celebration 4. Prospects -- Continue to employ survey results for informing prospect visits and solicitations November 1, 2009: Goal for 100 percent of campaign dollar objective.

18 Volunteer Leadership Volunteer Leadership Role and Authority 1. SNU Board of Trustees 2. SNU Foundation Board a. Corporate and Foundation Gifts Committee (with engagement from SNU Foundation Board members and other select volunteers) 3. Project Committee – Science Faculty, building professionals, others 4. Individual Gifts Committee – select faculty & staff and other volunteers B. Job Descriptions 1. Campaign Committee – limited size, working task group 2. Volunteer Solicitors – organized by three general divisions: generosity -- (volunteers who are leadership givers themselves); chronology – (volunteer alumni from the decades soliciting decadal alums); academic – (volunteers soliciting others within their own majors). C. Identification and recruitment D. Training 1. Orientation sessions – will be conducted for volunteers on an “as needed” basis, usually one-on-one or in small groups. 2. Solicitation skills – Every attempt will be made to pair volunteers with staff, so that experience can be balanced with inexperience and intuitive people skills can be balanced with seasoned solicitation abilities.

19 Campaign Communications A vigorous effort will be made to interpret the Campaign through various written and audio-visual materials, public events and special events for Campaign leaders, volunteers and participants. Eventually, a campaign newsletter may be published to keep leaders and donors informed of Campaign progress. Through Southern Light and various forms of printed and electronic media as may be appropriate, the campus will seek to keep the constituencies and the general public informed of the importance of this program to the future of the University. A. Pre-Announcement 1. Insider’s case -- The case is articulated in The SNU Science Initiative— 2010: Excel, Equip, Expand, Empower. 2. Campaign plan 3. Solicitation materials – Talking Paper; Campaign Newsletter 4. Two-dimensional renderings 5. Three dimensional models? 6. Survey to gain awareness and buy-in B. Post-announcement 1. Project brochure 2. Volunteer handbook or short printed guide 3. Videos 5. Telephone/Mail materials

20 Campaign Communications A. Pre-announcement Themes 1. Institutional, off-campus media – We must determine how best to attract off-campus media to our Science-focused news. 2. Primary Responsibility — Communications & Marketing B. Campaign Announcement 1. Purposes – To whom are we telling this story? 2. Participants 3. Description 4. Planning 5. Publicity C. Post-announcement Publicity 1. Purposes 2. Targeted audiences 3. Media 4. Responsibilities and authority D. Other Special Events 1. Ground breaking – coincide closely with the beginning of construction so that ground breaking is the natural beginning to the work to follow. 2. Campaign completion 3. Facility dedication 4. Other E. Staffing – Primary responsibility and authority resides with Communications & Marketing

21 Gift Counting A. Policy 1. Authority – rests with the President and the V.P. for Business & Finance as to the acceptability of any particular campaign gift that may fall outside the range of generally accepted gifts as provided for in the established SNU Gift Acceptance Policy. 2. Eligible purposes – for the purposes of this campaign, only gifts to construct the Science laboratories, retrofit the existing W. Don Beaver Science building or to purchase equipment to be utilized in Science classes is to be counted for campaign purposes 3. Pledge period—Gifts may be paid over a maximum of five years; because of the need to begin construction, shorter payout periods of 2-3 years will be encouraged. B. Implementation 1. President’s Office/Involvement 2. Development Staff 3. Campaign Committee 4. Board of Trustees

22 Gift Recognition A. Purpose 1. Appreciation 2. Promotion 3. Solicitation tool B. Current practice 1. Acknowledgement – It is the goal of the Office of Advancement Services to produce and mail gift acknowledgements within 48 hours of receipt. 2. Gift clubs – For annual SNU Fund gifts, recognition clubs are as follows:a.) Sponsor $1 - $499 b.) Partner $500 - $999 c.) The Gresham Circle Silver $1,000 - $2,499 d.) The Gresham Circle Gold $2,500 - $4,999 e.) The Gresham Circle Platinum $5,000 - $9,999 f.) The President’s Roundtable $10,000 - $24,999 g.) The President’s Ivy Ring Society $25, Outright gifts 4. Deferred gifts

23 Gift Recognition (contd.) C. Campaign Recognition 1. Naming Opportunities (see Appendix IV) 2. Memento – What takeaway items will be provided? Will we use a themed Homecoming reunion giveaway for these years? 3. Special events 4. Volunteers

24 Budget The cost of this campaign, above the operating budget for the Office for University Advancement will be funded by dollars given to the campaign. All gifts to the campaign may be assessed a fee to help cover campaign expenditures. All campaign materials and gift negotiations will include a disclosure indicating how the campaign is to be financed.

25 Contact Information John F. Martin Assoc. Vice President for University Advancement Southern Nazarene University Bethany, Oklahoma v: 405/ f: 405/


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