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Author Workshop: Effectively Communicating Your Research National Taiwan University 26 March 2014 Jeffrey Robens, PhD Download at: edanzediting.com/ntu.

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Presentation on theme: "Author Workshop: Effectively Communicating Your Research National Taiwan University 26 March 2014 Jeffrey Robens, PhD Download at: edanzediting.com/ntu."— Presentation transcript:

1 Author Workshop: Effectively Communicating Your Research National Taiwan University 26 March 2014 Jeffrey Robens, PhD Download at: edanzediting.com/ntu

2 Author Workshop: Effectively Communicating Your Research Fu Jen University 26 March 2014 Jeffrey Robens, PhD Download at: edanzediting.com/fju

3 About Jeff… Author Senior Editor Peer reviewer University of Pennsylvania

4 Be an effective communicator S Choose the best journal to reach your target audience Logically present your research in your manuscript Prepare effective titles and abstracts Convey the significance of your work to journal editors Properly revise your manuscript after peer review Choose the best journal to reach your target audience Logically present your research in your manuscript Prepare effective titles and abstracts Convey the significance of your work to journal editors Properly revise your manuscript after peer review Your goal should not only to be published, but also to be widely read/cited in the field

5 Journal selection Section 1 Download at: edanzediting.com/ntu

6 Journal selection Section 1 Download at: edanzediting.com/fju

7 Journal selection Factors to consider when choosing a journal Aims & scope Readership Open access Which factor is most important to you? Indexing

8 Journal selection Evaluating significance How new are your findings? Novelty How broadly relevant are your findings? Relevance What are the important real-world applications? Appeal

9 Journal selection Insert your proposed abstract Journal Selector –

10 Journal selection Recommended journals Filter by: Impact factor Publishing frequency Open access Filter by: Impact factor Publishing frequency Open access Journal Selector –

11 Journal selection Semantic matching terms Journal’s IF, aims & scope, and publication frequency Journal’s IF, aims & scope, and publication frequency Similar published articles Have they published similar articles recently? Have you cited some of these articles? Journal Selector –

12 Journal selection Tips to identify the most suitable journal S Identify the interests of the journal editor Editorials Review articles Special issues Editorials Review articles Special issues

13 Journal selection Tips to identify the most suitable journal S Editorials Review articles Special issues Editorials Review articles Special issues Editorials Review articles Special issues Editorials Review articles Special issues Editorials Review articles Special issues Editorials Review articles Special issues Manuscript Journal editor’s interests Journal AJournal BJournal C

14 Journal selection Tips to identify the most suitable journal S Identify the interests of the journal editor Identify the interests of the readers Editorials Review articles Special issues Editorials Review articles Special issues Most viewed Most cited Most viewed Most cited

15 Journal selection Tips to identify the most suitable journal S Most viewed Most cited Most viewed Most cited Most viewed Most cited Most viewed Most cited Most viewed Most cited Most viewed Most cited Manuscript Reader’s interests Journal AJournal BJournal C

16 Manuscript structure Section 2 Download at: edanzediting.com/ntu

17 Manuscript structure Section 2 Download at: edanzediting.com/fju

18 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Use your figures to structure your manuscript Where to start?  Your findings are why you want to publish your work  Form the basis of your manuscript  First step, is to logically organize your findings Figure 1 Figure 2 Table 1 Figure 3 Logical presentation Is anything missing? ? Additional analyses?

19 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Where to start?  Your findings are why you want to publish your work  Form the basis of your manuscript  First step, is to logically organize your findings Figure 1 Figure 2 Table 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Logical presentation New data Use your figures to structure your manuscript

20 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Prepare an outline Now that you know what findings you are going to present, you know what you need to write about Introduction Methods Results Discussion What background information you will introduce What background information you will introduce What analyses you will describe What findings you will present What interpretations, limitations, and implications you will discuss

21 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Introduction General introduction Specific aims Aims Current state of the field Problem in the field

22 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Literature review How did these lead to more recent studies? What are the knowledge gaps? What is your hypothesis? What did earlier studies show? Previous studies Previous studies Current study Current study

23 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Identify an important problem State aims that directly address this problem Identify an important problem State aims that directly address this problem Writing the Introduction Problem …little has been conducted to qualitatively assess whether self- efficacy and peer influence affect the likelihood of students engaging in academic dishonesty. Nora & Zhang Asia Pacific Educ Rev. 2010; 11: 573–584. Aims The purpose of this study is threefold: first, to determine the effect of peer attitudes and behaviour on the likelihood of cheating; secondly, to establish the significance of self-efficacy in promoting academic integrity; lastly, to ascertain effective ways of deterring academic dishonesty.

24 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Methods How it was done Methodology/analyses Constructs/parameters Measures/outcomes Methodology/analyses Constructs/parameters Measures/outcomes Quantification methods Statistical tests Quantification methods Statistical tests Who/what was used Participants Instruments Data collection Participants Instruments Data collection How it was analyzed Study design Consult a statistician

25 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Results 1.Initial observation 2.Characterization 3.Application 1.Initial observation 2.Characterization 3.Application Logical presentation Example: 1.Observe a correlation between depression and Internet use 2.Characterize the severity of depression, time spent online, websites visited 3.Demonstrate decreased Internet use improves severity of depression Example: 1.Observe a correlation between depression and Internet use 2.Characterize the severity of depression, time spent online, websites visited 3.Demonstrate decreased Internet use improves severity of depression

26 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Results 1.Initial observation 2.Characterization 3.Application 1.Initial observation 2.Characterization 3.Application Each subsection corresponds to one figure Each subsection corresponds to one figure What you found, not what it means Logical presentation Subsections Factual description

27 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Discussion Summary of findings Relevance of findings Implications for the field Implications for the field Similarities/differences Unexpected results Counter-arguments Limitations

28 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Discussion – the end The Spanish version of AIDA showed good psychometric properties in Mexico and can be used to assess the construct “pathology-related identity integration vs. diffusion” with reliability, validity, and content equivalence in comparison with the original AIDA questionnaire. This finding supports the cross-cultural generalizability of the underlying concept and confirms the importance of culture-specific test adaption in addition to literal translation of the questionnaire. Nevertheless, some items should be improved. Therefore, the test version of “AIDA Spanish – Mexico” should be further adapted and should be tested in a more heterogeneous population. Conclusion Implications Future directions Why your work is important to your readers Kassin et al. Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health. 2013; 7: 25.

29 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Linking your ideas General background Objectives Methodology Results and figures Summary of findings Implications for the field Relevance of findings Problems in the field Logically link your ideas throughout your manuscript Current state of the field Introduction Methods Results Discussion

30 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Linking your ideas …no research has examined how interacting with Facebook influences subjective well-being over time. We addressed this issue by…measuring in-vivo behavior and psychological experience over time. These analyses indicated that Facebook use predicts declines in…subjective well-being… Problem Objectives Conclusion Discussion Introduction Kross et al. PLoS ONE 2013; 8: e69841.

31 Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Writing effective conclusions Your conclusion is a summary of your findings Your conclusion should be the answer to your research problem that is supported by your findings Emphasizes how your study will help advance the field Emphasizes how your study will help advance the field

32 Thank you! Any questions? Follow us on Like us on Facebook facebook.com/EdanzEditing Download and further reading edanzediting.com/ntu Jeffrey Robens:

33 Thank you! Any questions? Follow us on Like us on Facebook facebook.com/EdanzEditing Download and further reading edanzediting.com/fju Jeffrey Robens:

34 Who’s hungry? First impressions are important!

35 Titles and abstracts Section 3 Download at: edanzediting.com/ntu

36 Titles and abstracts Section 3 Download at: edanzediting.com/fju

37 Customer Service Titles and abstracts Important points Summarize key finding Contains keywords Less than 20 words Summarize key finding Contains keywords Less than 20 words Avoid Effective titles Your title should be a concise summary of your most important finding Questions Describing methods Abbreviations “New” or “novel” Questions Describing methods Abbreviations “New” or “novel”

38 Customer Service Titles and abstracts Abstract First impression of your paper Importance of your results Validity of your conclusions Relevance of your aims Relevance of your aims Judge your writing style Probably only part that will be read

39 Customer Service Titles and abstracts Sections of an abstract Aims Background Methods Results Conclusion Why the study was done Your hypothesis Analyses Most important findings Conclusion/implications Concise summary of your research

40 Customer Service Titles and abstracts Unstructured abstract Political thought and behavior play an important role in our lives, from ethnic tensions in Europe, to the war in Iraq and the Middle Eastern conflict, to parliamentary and presidential elections. However, little is known about how the individual's political attitudes and decisions are shaped by subtle national cues that are so prevalent in our environment. We report a series of experiments that show that subliminal exposure to one's national flag influences political attitudes, intentions, and decisions, both in laboratory settings and in “real-life” behavior. Furthermore, this manipulation consistently narrowed the gap between those who score high vs. low on a scale of identification with Israeli nationalism. The first two experiments examined participants' stance toward the Israeli–Palestinian conflict and the Jewish settlers in the West Bank. Experiment 3 examined voting intentions and actual voting in Israel's recently held general elections. The results portray a consistent picture: subtle reminders of one's nationality significantly influence political thought and overt political behavior. Hassin et al. PNAS. 2007; 104: 19757‒19761.

41 Customer Service Titles and abstracts Unstructured abstract Conclusion The results portray a consistent picture: subtle reminders of one's nationality significantly influence political thought and overt political behavior. Results Furthermore, this manipulation consistently narrowed the gap between those who score high vs. low on a scale of identification with Israeli nationalism. The first two experiments examined participants' stance toward the Israeli– Palestinian conflict and the Jewish settlers in the West Bank. Experiment 3 examined voting intentions and actual voting in Israel's recently held general elections. Methods We report a series of experiments that show that subliminal exposure to one's national flag influences political attitudes, intentions, and decisions, both in laboratory settings and in “real-life” behavior. Background Political thought and behavior play an important role in our lives, from ethnic tensions in Europe, to the war in Iraq and the Middle Eastern conflict, to parliamentary and presidential elections. However, little is known about how the individual's political attitudes and decisions are shaped by subtle national cues that are so prevalent in our environment. Hassin et al. PNAS. 2007; 104: 19757‒19761.

42 Journal Editors are busy!

43 Cover letters Section 4 Download at: edanzediting.com/ntu

44 Cover letters Section 4 Download at: edanzediting.com/fju

45 Coverage and Staffing Plan Cover letters Abstract: First impression for readers Abstract: First impression for readers Cover letters are the first impression for the Journal Editor Significance Relevance Significance Relevance Writing style Interesting to their readers? Is your work important?

46 Coverage and Staffing Plan Cover letters Dear Dr Ellenbogen, Please find enclosed our manuscript entitled “Presenteeism among Taiwanese employees: Personality and job stress”, which we would like to submit for publication as a Research Paper in Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal. This study examines presenteeism, the situation in which workers are present at work, but their ability to do their jobs is impaired by physical or mental symptoms. This topic is important to companies as studies have found that the costs of presenteeism can be higher than medical costs associated with treating the underlying conditions. Currently, the relationships between common mental health symptoms and presenteeism, as well as the effects of job strain and workplace social support, are unclear. We aimed to evaluate these relationships and consider the effect of personality traits on both presenteeism and common mental health symptoms. We used an online questionnaire incorporating several well-established and verified questionnaires to assess presenteeism, mental disturbance, job strain and workplace support, and temperament and character. We found that common mental health symptoms are a good predictor of presenteeism. Although workplace social support is generally agreed to reduce the severity of common mental health symptoms, we found no direct effect on presenteeism. Our results clearly link presenteeism to common mental health symptoms, and also show the negative effects of strain and poor workplace support. This study is of interest to researchers, managers, mental health clinicians and occupational health specialists interested in the issue of workplace stress and its management. This study is likely to lead to an improved approach to preventing and managing both presenteeism and common mental health symptoms, and is applicable worldwide. Therefore, we feel this manuscript is particularly suitable for Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal and of great interest to its readers. Give the background to the research What was done and what was found Interest to journal’s readers A good cover letter We would also like to suggest the following reviewers for our manuscript… Editor’s name Manuscript title Publication type Recommend reviewers “Must-have” statements

47 Coverage and Staffing Plan Cover letters “Must-have” statements Not submitted to other journals Source of funding Authors agree on paper/journal Original and unpublished No conflicts of interest Authorship contributions Disclaimers about publication ethics

48 Coverage and Staffing Plan Cover letters Recommending reviewers Where to find them? From your reading/references, networking at conferences How senior? Aim for mid-level researchers Who to avoid? Collaborators (past 5 years), researchers from same institution Collaborators (past 5 years), researchers from same institution Look for reviewers who have published in your target journal

49 Coverage and Staffing Plan Cover letters Choose internationally 1 or 2 reviewers from Asia 1 or 2 reviewers from Europe 1 or 2 reviewers from North America 1 or 2 reviewers from Asia 1 or 2 reviewers from Europe 1 or 2 reviewers from North America Journal Editors want to see an international list for 2 reasons: 1.Shows that you are familiar with your field worldwide 2.Shows that your research is relevant worldwide Increased readership → increased citations → increased impact factor Journal Editors want to see an international list for 2 reasons: 1.Shows that you are familiar with your field worldwide 2.Shows that your research is relevant worldwide Increased readership → increased citations → increased impact factor

50 Peer review Section 5

51 Peer review What reviewers are looking for The study The manuscript Relevant hypothesis Good study design Appropriate methodology Good data analyses Valid conclusions Relevant hypothesis Good study design Appropriate methodology Good data analyses Valid conclusions Logical flow of information Manuscript structure and formatting Appropriate references High readability Logical flow of information Manuscript structure and formatting Appropriate references High readability Abstract and Introduction Methods Results and Figures Discussion

52 Peer review Dr Mark Ellenbogen Editor-in-Chief Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal 3 September 2013 Dear Dr Ellenbogen, Re: Resubmission of manuscript reference No. WJS Please find attached a revised version of our manuscript originally entitled “Presenteeism among Taiwanese employees: Personality and job stress,” which we would like to resubmit for consideration for publication in the Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal. The reviewer’s comments were highly insightful and enabled us to greatly improve the quality of our manuscript. In the following pages are our point-by-point responses to each of the comments. Revisions in the manuscript are shown as underlined text. In accordance with the first comment, the title has been revised and the entire manuscript has undergone substantial English editing. We hope that the revisions in the manuscript and our accompanying responses will be sufficient to make our manuscript suitable for publication in the Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal. Address editor personally Manuscript ID number Thank reviewers Highlight major changes Writing response letters

53 Peer review Agreeing with reviewers Reviewer Comment: In your analysis of the data you have chosen to use a somewhat obscure fitting function (regression). In my opinion, a simple Gaussian function would have sufficed. Moreover, the results would be more instructive and easier to compare to previous results. Response: We agree with the reviewer’s assessment of the analysis. Our tailored function, in its current form, makes it difficult to tell that this measurement constitutes a significant improvement over previously reported values. We describe our new analysis using a Gaussian fitting function in our revised Results section (Page 6, Lines 12–18). Agreement Revisions Location

54 Peer review Disagreeing with reviewers Reviewer Comment: In your analysis of the data you have chosen to use a somewhat obscure fitting function (regression). In my opinion, a simple Gaussian function would have sufficed. Moreover, the results would be more instructive and easier to compare to previous results. Response: Although a simple Gaussian fit would facilitate comparison with the results of other studies, our tailored function allows for the analysis of the data in terms of the Smith model [Smith et al., 1998]. We have now explained the use of this function and the Smith model in our revised Discussion section (Page 12, Lines 2–6).

55 Peer review Reviewer Comment: In your analysis of the data you have chosen to use a somewhat obscure fitting function (regression). In my opinion, a simple Gaussian function would have sufficed. Moreover, the results would be more instructive and easier to compare to previous results. Response: Although a simple Gaussian fit would facilitate comparison with the results of other studies, our tailored function allows for the analysis of the data in terms of the Smith model [Smith et al., 1998]. We have now explained the use of this function and the Smith model in our revised Discussion section (Page 12, Lines 2–6). Evidence Revisions Location Disagreeing with reviewers

56 Peer review Reviewer comment: Currently, the authors’ conclusion that this questionnaire is appropriate for cross-cultural analyses is not completely valid because their participants all resided in Taiwan. They should also show the questionnaire’s validity in participants living in other countries. “Unfair” reviewer comments Reasons why reviewers might make these comments  Current results are not appropriate for the impact factor of the journal  Reviewer is being “unfair” Reasons why reviewers might make these comments  Current results are not appropriate for the impact factor of the journal  Reviewer is being “unfair”

57 Peer review “Unfair” reviewer comments What you should do  Do the experiments, revise, and resubmit to the same journal  Withdraw submission and resubmit current manuscript to a journal with a different scope or lower impact factor  Contact the journal editor if you feel reviewer is being unfair  Do the experiments, revise, and resubmit to the same journal  Withdraw submission and resubmit current manuscript to a journal with a different scope or lower impact factor  Contact the journal editor if you feel reviewer is being unfair

58 If rejected, what should you do? Option 1: New submission to the same journal  Fully revise manuscript  Prepare point-by-point responses  Include the original manuscript ID number Option 1: New submission to the same journal  Fully revise manuscript  Prepare point-by-point responses  Include the original manuscript ID number Option 2: New submission to a different journal  Revise manuscript  Reformat according to the author guidelines Option 2: New submission to a different journal  Revise manuscript  Reformat according to the author guidelines

59 If accepted, what’s next?  Promote your work on social networks Twitter, LinkedIn  Respond to post-publication comments  Present your work at conferences Allows you to discuss your work personally with your peers Get feedback about your work and future directions Networking and collaborations

60 Be an effective communicator S Choose the best journal to reach your target audience Logically present your research in your manuscript Prepare effective titles and abstracts Convey the significance of your work to journal editors Properly revise your manuscript after peer review Choose the best journal to reach your target audience Logically present your research in your manuscript Prepare effective titles and abstracts Convey the significance of your work to journal editors Properly revise your manuscript after peer review Your goal should not only to be published, but also to be widely read/cited in the field

61 Thank you! Any questions? Follow us on Like us on Facebook facebook.com/EdanzEditing Download and further reading edanzediting.com/ntu Jeffrey Robens:

62 Thank you! Any questions? Follow us on Like us on Facebook facebook.com/EdanzEditing Download and further reading edanzediting.com/fju Jeffrey Robens:


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