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A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management Chapter 4.

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Presentation on theme: "A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management Chapter 4."— Presentation transcript:

1 A Proactive and Positive Approach to Classroom Management Chapter 4

2 Chapter 4: Expectations When your expectations are clear students never have to guess how you expect them to behave.

3 Chapter 4: Expectations Task 1: Clarify CHAMPS Expectations for Instructional Activities Task 2: Clarify CHAMPS Expectations for Transitions Task 3: Prepare Lessons to Communicate your Expectations

4 CHAMPS Conversation Can students talk to each other? Level 0Silence Level 1Whisper Level 2Soft conversation Level 3Presentational Level 4Outside Help How do they get your attention? H C

5 CHAMPS Activity What is the task or end product? M Movement Can the students move about? P Participation What does the behavior look or sound like? A S Success!

6 Task 1: Expectations for Instructional Activities The first step in defining your behavioral expectations is to make a list of activities in which your students will participate on a day to day basis.

7 Instructional Activities Stand-N-Share (Kagan, 2009)

8 Instructional Activities Teacher Lecture Co-Taught lesson Experiment Independent Seatwork Small Groups Whole groups Direct Instruction Stations Peer Tutoring Cooperative Groups

9 CHAMPS Activities Worksheet Step 1: Make a list of the activities you have in your daily schedule. Step 2: Prioritize the needs of your classroom based on which activities appear to be the most difficult at this time for you and your students.

10 CHAMPS Activities Worksheet Step 3: Select one activity from your priority list. Write it at the top of the CHAMPS Activity Worksheet.

11 CHAMPS Activities Worksheet Step 4: Complete the CHAMPS Activity Worksheet by answering each question on the worksheet. Remember you are only describing your expectations for one activity at a time.

12 CHAMPs Classroom Activity Worksheet Activity: Independent seatwork C ONVERSATION Can students engage in conversations with each other during this activity? If yes, about what? Yes, level 2 ( Only about work assigned ) With whom? Only students they sit next to How many students can be involved in a single conversation? Only two How long can the conversation last? Only about a minute then back to work H ELP How do students get questions answered? How do students get your attention? Put up red card and mark the question that needs help If students have to wait for help, what should they do while they wait? Continue working on the rest of the assignment A CTIVITY What is the expected end product of this activity? (Note: This may vary from day to day.) Short follow up review to mini lecture MOVEMENT Can students get out of their seats during the activity? If yes, acceptable reasons include: Pencil Yes Restroom yes, after signing out Drink No Hand in/pick up materials yes Other: Do they need permission from you? Only for the restroom P ARTICIPATION What behaviors show that students are participating fully and responsibly? Looking at papers, writing or doing what task requires What behaviors show that a student is not participating? wandering around the room, talking about something other than assignment, not doing task

13 Task 2: Clarify CHAMPS Expectations for Transitions Transition times, or times when students transition from one activity to the next, can be problematic in terms of student behavior. It could end up costing valuable instruction time.

14 Transition Activities 1.Before the bell rings. 2.After the bell rings. 3.Getting out paper, pencil, and heading paper. 4.Getting a book out and opening to a particular page. 5.Moving to and from groups. 6.Cleaning up. 7.Trading papers for corrections. 8.Handing things out 9.Handing things back 10.Opening and dismissal routines. 11.Leaving the classroom for another activity. 12.Putting things away. 13.Handing in work.

15 Pay attention to the “level of structure” your students need.

16 The more structure your class requires, the more specific and tightly orchestrated you need to make your expectations for transitions.

17 CHAMPS Transition Worksheet Step 1: Make a list of the transitions you have in your daily schedule. Step 2: Prioritize the needs of your classroom based on which transition appears to be the most difficult at this time for you and your students.

18 CHAMPS Transition Worksheet Step 3: Select one transition from your priority list. Write it at the top of the CHAMPS Transition Worksheet.

19 CHAMPS Transition Worksheet Step 4: Complete the CHAMPS Transition Worksheet by answering each question on the worksheet. Remember you are only describing your expectations for one transition at a time.

20 CHAMPS Transition Worksheet Transition: C ONVERSATION Can students engage in conversations with each other during this transition? If yes, clarify how (so that they are keeping their attention on completing the transition). H ELP How do students get questions answered? How do students get your attention? A CTIVITY Explain transition. What will be different afterwards? (e.g., change in location, use of different materials, etc.). Include time criteria (i.e., how long it should take). M OVEMENT If the transition itself DOES NOT involve getting out of seats, can students get out of their seat for any reason during the transition? If "yes," what are acceptable reasons? If the transition itself involves out-of-seat movement, can a student go elsewhere, for example, to sharpen a pencil? P ARTICIPATION What behaviors show that students are participating in the transition fully and responsibly? What behaviors show that a student is not participating appropriately in the transition?

21 CHAMPS Transition Worksheet Step 5: Prepare to teach the expectations you have described using the information in. Task 3: Prepare Lessons on Expectations.

22 Task 3: Prepare Lessons on Expectations Develop a preliminary plan and prepare lessons for teaching your CHAMPS expectations to students.

23 Three Step Process 1. Teach your expectations before the activity or transition begins 2. Monitor student behavior by circulating and visually scanning. 3. Provide feedback during the activity and at the conclusion of the activity. Begin the cycle again for the next activity/transition

24 Options to organize the content of your expectations Create a list T-Chart: “looks like/sounds like” Visual Displays – Overheads – Flip Charts Demonstrations Practice and Rehearsal Opportunities Modeling/Role Playing

25 Things to Think About 1.How detailed do your lessons need to be? 2.How long do you anticipate having to actively teach the lessons? 3.What is the best way to organize the content you are teaching?

26 Things to Consider Your own teaching style Level of Structure (high, medium, low) Age and sophistication of your students

27 “If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.” “if a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach” If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach”. If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.” If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we…. …….teach? …….punish?” Why do we OVERTLY teach our expectations?

28 “ Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?” Tom Herner (NASDE President) Counterpoint, 1998, p.2

29 CHAMPS Things To Do Checklist

30 Self Reflection with Checklist Read through the 16 essential elements. Check all the elements you have in place. Celebrate your success and what is currently working for you. Review the essential elements that are not in place and prioritize 1 through 5. Review the text, read the information you need. Find a strategy that matches the level of structure you need and your personal style. Match the structural needs of your students to each activity & transition. Work on one or two elements at a time.


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