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LONG TERM GOALS LONG TERM GOALS Developing critical thinking skills and grooming the slow learners to secure good grades with the help of 21 st century.

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Presentation on theme: "LONG TERM GOALS LONG TERM GOALS Developing critical thinking skills and grooming the slow learners to secure good grades with the help of 21 st century."— Presentation transcript:

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2 LONG TERM GOALS LONG TERM GOALS Developing critical thinking skills and grooming the slow learners to secure good grades with the help of 21 st century methods and make learning Mathematics fun.

3 SHORT TERM GOALS Modifying my questioning strategy and encouraging independent and collaborative work through group discussions that will enhance their skills and improve their concepts by the aid of the 21 st century technology.

4 INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES AND TASKS 21st Century Mission NCLB “ No Child Left Behind “ Instructions / Strategies will comprise of: QQuizzes. QQuestions involving higher order thinking. UUse of Information technology GGroup activities to build a team work spirit PPresentations to lift their confidence level PPosting of the assigned tasks on wiki & CLMS

5 StrategiesApproachMode Multimedia Presentations Observation SkillsInstructional lessons Questions involving higher order thinking Thinking Skills Questioning skills Worksheets and Questionnaires. Independent and Group work Explanatory Skills Reviewing. Practical Application Team work

6 AUGUSTNOVEMBERSEPTEMBEROCTOBER

7 Bloom's Taxonomy is a hierarchy of skills that reflects growing complexity and ability to use higher-order thinking skills (HOTS).

8 CompetenceSkills DemonstratedQuestion Cues: Knowledge observation and recall of information knowledge of dates, events, places knowledge of major ideas mastery of subject matter list, define, tell, describe, identify, show, label, collect, examine, tabulate, quote, name, who, when, where, etc. Comprehension understanding information grasp meaning translate knowledge into new context interpret facts, compare, contrast order, group, infer causes predict consequences summarize, describe, interpret, contrast, predict, associate, distinguish, estimate, differentiate, discuss, extend Application use information use methods, concepts, theories in new situations solve problems using required skills or knowledge apply, demonstrate, calculate, complete, illustrate, show, solve, examine, modify, relate, change, classify, experiment, discover Analysis seeing pattern organization of parts recognition of hidden meanings identification of components analyze, separate, order, explain, connect, classify, arrange, divide, compare, select, explain, infer Synthesis use old ideas to create new ones generalize from given facts relate knowledge from several areas predict, draw conclusions combine, integrate, modify, rearrange, substitute, plan, create, design, invent, what if?, compose, formulate, prepare, generalize, rewrite Evaluation compare and discriminate between ideas assess value of theories, presentations make choices based on reasoned argument verify value of evidence recognize subjectivity assess, decide, rank, grade, test, measure, recommend, convince, select, judge, explain, discriminate, support, conclude, compare, summarize

9 Types of Questions Within the context of open-ended mathematical tasks, it is useful to group questions into four main categories. 1. Starter questions These take the form of open-ended questions which focus the children's thinking in a general direction and give them a starting point. Examples: How could you sort these ? How many ways can you find to ? 2. Questions to stimulate mathematical thinking These questions assist children to focus on particular strategies and help them to see patterns and relationships. This aids the formation of a strong conceptual network. Examples: What is the same? What is different? 3. Assessment questions Questions such as these ask children to explain what they are doing or how they arrived at a solution. They allow the teacher to see how the children are thinking, what they understand and what level they are operating at. Examples: What have you discovered? How did you find that out? 4. Final discussion questions These questions draw together the efforts of the class and prompt sharing and comparison of strategies and solutions. Examples: Who has the same answer/ pattern/ grouping as this? Why/why not? Have you thought of another way this could be done?

10 SOLUTIONS TO ANTICIPATED CHALLENGES CHALLENGES SOLUTIONS UUncomfortable in group work.  Might feel shy in giving presentation. SStudents might not have computers at home. NNo access to internet at home. DDifficulty in attempting high order thinking questions MMotivation. CCounseling. EEncouragement. MMarking on Individual Efforts. UUse of Internet at school. SSupport sessions.

11 CHALLENGES SStudents might not have computers at home. NNo access to internet at home The question is do we understand what the term literate means in the 21 st century ? “ A person who has his/her personal address “ ---WE NEED A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE --- Every single child in our country might not have a computer nor an internet connection at home but most of them do own a cell phone. Power point is a very useful tool, it can be used to create graphics which can then be utilized to c cc create videos because the data can be stored in phones memory and reviewed anytime to recall the concepts. Modifying the Aids of Teaching.

12 O level math – Educating Pakistan Search “ O level math – Educating Pakistan “ on youtube

13 Educating PakistanFacebook Search “ Educating Pakistan “ on Facebook

14 ENLARGEMENT Scale Factor = +2 Centre Of Enlargement E (0,0) ENLARGEMENT Scale Factor = +2 Centre Of Enlargement E (0,0) The Distance of the Image will be Twice the Distance between Object and E for k = 2. k = +ve  the Image and the Object are on the same side of the E. The Distance of the Image will be Twice the Distance between Object and E for k = 2. k = +ve  the Image and the Object are on the same side of the E. Area of Image = k ² x Area of Object

15 O level math – Educating Pakistan Search “ O level math – Educating Pakistan “ on youtube Educating PakistanFacebook or “ Educating Pakistan “ on Facebook

16 Modifying the traditional methods of teaching.

17 MY LONG TERM GOAL: WAS I REALLY ABLE TO MAKE LEARNING MATHS FUN??? MY LONG TERM GOAL: Developing critical thinking skills and grooming the slow learners to secure good grades with the help of 21 st century methods and make learning Mathematics fun. WAS I REALLY ABLE TO MAKE LEARNING MATHS FUN???

18 As kids we used to construct a few shapes as a part of a game not knowing that they are enhancing our thinking and analyzing skills. Can you Sketch a similar figure without lifting the pen???

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20 x 4 x 1 HIGH ORDER THINKING Construct a SQUARE with the four Irregular ( unequal lengths ) QUADRILATERALS

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22 x 4 x 1 Construct a Bigger Square with the four irregular Quadrilaterals and the SQUARE.

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25 edieval mathematician and businessman Fibonacci (Leonardo Pisano) posed the following problem in his treatise Liber Abaci (pub. 1202): How many pairs of rabbits will be produced in a year, beginning with a single pair, if in every month each pair bears a new pair which becomes productive from the second month on?

26 The expansion would carry forward, with each new pair coming to maturity and starting their own little Fibonacci Series to be added to the whole. Over the months, with no deaths, the rabbit pair expansion would look like this: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89,

27 Anyone can see that by December the poor owner would be inundated with rabbits.

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29 the QUESTION is how did we find this Answer?

30 Each new number in the sequence is the combination of the two numbers before it. Five plus eight makes thirteen. Eight plus thirteen makes twenty-one. and so on.

31 Fibonacci for Fun: The Fibonacci Series has a whole lot of strange and interesting patterns. For example, The sum of any 10 consecutive numbers in the Fibonacci Series is divisible by 11. The square of a Fibonacci number, minus the square the Fibonacci number two terms before it, will yield another Fibonacci number. Piano keys in an octave are made up of Fibonacci Numbers; eight white, five black, and thirteen in all.

32 The Fibonacci sequence makes its appearance in other ways within mathematics as well. For example, it appears as sums of oblique diagonals in Pascal’s triangle:

33 Fibonacci Goes Gold in Art and Architecture Each number in the series is divided by the previous number. One divided by one is one Two divided by one is two Three divided by two is 1.5 Five divided by three is Eight divided by five is Thirteen divided by eight is Twenty-one divided by thirteen is The Golden Mean or The Divine Proportion is and it seems to be everywhere in art and architecture.

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35 what about curves?

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37 13, the unlucky number, is found at position number 7, the lucky number! 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55,

38 PREPARING OUR YOUTH TO HELP THOSE WHO CAN’T AFFORD EDUCATION STUDENTS OF THE CITY SCHOOL GULSHAN CAMPUS

39 RESOURCES Discussion with Teachers www Word Processing Multimedia Spreadsheet applications Intel® Teach Program Getting Started Course Manual Intel Trainers

40 CONCLUSION Implementing The Student-Centered Teaching Methodology Interactive lessons WorkingIndependently Group Work Group Work Questions of High Order Thinking

41 Thank You.


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