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Anchor Activity Check Out the Student Voice Handouts

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1 Anchor Activity Check Out the Student Voice Handouts
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Check Out the Student Voice Handouts As we wait for people to arrive: Read through Student Voice Initiative One-Pager and/or the Principals Want to Know handout(s) Complete the Anchor Activity: Ticket in the Door alone or with a partner I’d (we’d) like to learn more about… Student voice is… I am (we are) familiar with… Student voice is evident in my (our) school(s) and classrooms by… A goal I have today is… Review the Student Voice Initiative handout and complete the sentences: Encourage participants to begin the anchor activity once they have introduced themselves at their table. Facilitators will need to ensure that: Handouts 1, 2 & 3 are on the tables NOTE: There can be an opportunity to debrief the anchor activity later in the session Tables may be set up by school, division, department or randomly depending on the needs of the group. Table groups of 4-6 participants are recommended.

2 Student Success Learning to 18 Student Voice Module
Summer Program Summer 2011 Welcome to the Student Success/Learning to 18 Student Voice Summer Program.

3 Student Voice Summer Program 2011
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Focus for Student Voice Module: Introduction to Student Voice Initiate exploration of… “How might we invite students to co-create their learning communities?” Explain to participants that the Ministry has provided some common introductory modules and that the board has selected a focus and developed the program in response to local needs. This is the first year that the one-day Student Voice Module has been offered. Outline why your board has chosen to focus on Student Voice and how your board has designed the afternoon session to focus on specific board initiatives. An option for the afternoon would be to run a SpeakUp in a Box with the group.

4 Materials Review *Required For Student Voice Module*
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE *Required For Student Voice Module* Handouts 1 & 2 – Student Voice Initiative one-pager, Principals Want to Know newsletter Handout 3 - Ticket in the Door Handout 4 - Making Connections Organizer Handout 5 – BINGO Recording Sheet Handout 6 – 9 Student Voice Indicators Handout 7 – Hart’s Ladder Handout 8 – Suggested Further Reading SpeakUp in a Box –one for each participant

5 Module Agenda 1 2 3 Minds On Action Consolidation
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE 1 Minds On Setting the stage – the provincial context Learning Goals/Essential Questions Introduction Activity / Debriefing Anchor Activity Inviting Student Voices - Student Voice DVD Research & Student Engagement – Students Said Activity Action The Student Voice Initiative Overview Hart’s Ladder: Assessment of Student Participation – Read, Pair, Share Activity Consolidation Exploring SpeakUp in a Box Making Connections Organizer Suggested further reading Student Voice Module Conclusion  2 3 The agenda for the Module is set up using the three part lesson plan; Minds On, Action and Consolidation Blank templates are available at Minds On Establishing a positive learning environment Connecting to prior learning and/or experiences Setting the context for learning Action Introducing new learning or extending/reinforcing prior learning Providing opportunities for practice and application of learning (guided – independent) Consolidation Helping students demonstrate what they have learned Providing opportunities for consolidation and reflection

6 Minds On Setting the Stage – the provincial context
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Setting the Stage – the provincial context Learning Goals/Essential Questions Introduction Activity / Debriefing Anchor Activity Inviting Student Voices - Student Voice DVD Research & Student Engagement – Students Said Activity

7 Provincial Context Core priorities: High Levels of Student Achievement
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Core priorities: High Levels of Student Achievement Reducing the Gaps in Student Achievement Increased Public Confidence in Our Publicly Funded Schools The work of Student Success/learning to 18 addresses the three core priorities for education in Ontario. The core priorities and supporting strategies are outlined in detail in Reach Every Student: Energizing Ontario Education (Winter 2008). The program supports the Ministry of Education’s core priorities of higher levels of student achievement, reduced gaps in student achievement, and increased public confidence in publicly funded education.

8 School Effectiveness Framework
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE From the Student Achievement Division The 2010 School Effectiveness Framework is a self-assessment tool, grounded in research and professional learning, used to promote school improvement and student success. The first draft was released for implementation in elementary schools in Feedback lead to the K-12 refinement and further refinements were made in From September 2010 to 2012 the K-12 SEF will be implemented in all elementary and secondary schools in Ontario.

9 School Effectiveness Framework
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE A Support For School Improvement And Student Success * Student Voice and the School Effectiveness Framework 3.1 The teaching and learning environment is inclusive and reflects individual student strengths, needs and learning preferences. 3.2 School programs incorporate students’ stated priorities and reflect the diversity, needs and interests of the school population. 3.3 Students are partners in conversations about school improvement. 3.4 Explicit strategies are in place to enable students to demonstrate strong citizenship skills such as leadership, teamwork and advocacy. From the Student Achievement Division The 2010 School Effectiveness Framework is a self-assessment tool, grounded in research and professional learning, used to promote school improvement and student success. The first draft was released for implementation in elementary schools in Feedback lead to the K-12 refinement and further refinements were made in From September 2010 to 2012 the K-12 SEF will be implemented in all elementary and secondary schools in Ontario. Student Voice and the School Effectiveness Framework 3.1 The teaching and learning environment is inclusive and reflects individual student strengths, needs and learning preferences. 3.2 School programs incorporate students’ stated priorities and reflect the diversity, needs and interests of the school population. 3.3 Students are partners in conversations about school improvement. 3.4 Explicit strategies are in place to enable students to demonstrate strong citizenship skills such as leadership, teamwork and advocacy.

10 Supporting the Instructional Core
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Leading Learning – leadership This slide how provincial direction, district priorities and school improvement efforts support classroom instruction. It also shows how classroom data and narrative inform school planning which in turn inform the district and province about student learning needs and the policy, program and professional learning supports that may be needed. When learning leadership is imagined as a prism, student voice can be thought of as part of the core.

11 Example Board (BIPSA) School (SIPSA) Classroom
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Board (BIPSA) School (SIPSA) Classroom (planning for teaching and learning) Professional Learning Cycle (collaborative inquiry) Host a forum involving students to gather feedback on the 4 pillars Students host a forum using SpeakUp in a Box to identify what helps and hinders their learning and their ideas about what adults and students can do. Senior Social Science course Action Research using collaborative inquiry: (Plan, Act, Observe, Reflect)For example: Divide into a project team of 3 or 4 students.  You are a team of policy advisers in the Ministry of Education in Ontario. Along with several other teams in the province, you have been assigned to conduct original research into student engagement among students in Grades etc. This slide shows how the Board Improvement Plan can be connected to the School Improvement Plan and the classroom.

12 A Professional Learning Cycle
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE The Professional Learning Cycle All boards in Ontario are engaged in the implementation of collaborative inquiry as a vehicle for professional learning. The professional learning cycle is used by teams of educators as a process for professional learning. The cycle begins when educators examine data (including student work) to determine a student learning need. The identified need becomes the focus for professional learning. Learning occurs during team meetings and in-between meetings when educators share practice, analyse student work or participate in workshops or seminars to build their knowledge-base. Provide an example of how the professional learning cycle could be used in relation to your module. In the first phase of the cycle, PLAN, a learning team examines data and evidence to determine an area of student learning need. Once a specific need is highlighted, the team determines the learning that is important for them as educators, in order to plan instruction that addresses the needs of their students. The team decides what evidence (e.g., a common evaluation task) will be analysed at the end of the cycle to indicate the extent to which the student need has been addressed. In ACT, the second phase of the professional learning cycle, members of the learning team implement the strategies and actions that they planned in the first part of the cycle. During this early implementation phase, seeking student feedback and assessing for learning are continuous so that instruction can be adjusted according to the emerging needs of students. Learning team members continue to learn in their selected areas through means established in the PLAN phase – such as observing colleagues, co-teaching, engaging in a book study and/or through practice and reflection. The OBSERVE phase, occurs in mid-unit or mid-implementation and focuses on monitoring student learning and sharing instructional practice. The learning team takes a good look at evidence of student learning - including student work and student feedback - to see if students are on track or if an alternate approach is required to help them achieve or be more fully engaged. Educators share their practice in a variety of ways – including analysis of each other’s plans and strategies to find solutions to current issues - or simply to share alternative approaches. Although reflection is part of each phase of the cycle, it is in the REFLECT phase, at or near the end of a unit, that the team comes together to determine if what was initiated in the PLAN phase has worked – Have educators learned what was necessary to begin to address the needs of their learners? Have the student needs been met? In the REFLECT phase, to address these questions, team members share and discuss student assessment results, reflect on their own learning and instructional practice and determine next steps.

13 Student Success Grades 7-12 Key Elements
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTION Differentiated Instruction Math GAINS Literacy GAINS Professional Learning Cycle Student Voice School Effectiveness Framework INTERVENTIONS Credit Rescue / Recovery Transitions Supports/Taking Stock Children and Youth in Care Re-engagement Strategy Supervised Alternative Learning School Support Initiative PROGRAMS Specialist High Skills Major Dual Credits Expanded Cooperative Education Ontario Skills Passport Board Specific Programs LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT Student Success Leaders Student Success Teachers Student Success School and Cross Panel Teams This slide provides an overview of the Student Success/Learning to 18 programs and initiatives for Grades They can be clustered under the four main headings. Student Voice can assist each element and the MSAC Report 2009, 9 Student Voice Indicators and MSAC Report 2010 provide a sumar Student Voice Effective Instruction: The teaching and learning environment is inclusive and reflects individual student strengths, needs and learning preferences. Programs: School programs incorporate students’ stated priorities and reflect the diversity, needs and interests of the school population. Student Voice indicators #3 and 4. Interventions: Students are partners in conversations about school improvement and have indicated in the 9 SV Indicators that they would like to share their ideas on what helps and hinders their learning (e.g. SpeakUp in a Box) Leadership Development: Student Success Leaders, Teachers and School and Cross Panel teams –distribute leadership to include students. Students have identified in the #2 Student Voice indicator there should be strategies in place to help students learn leadership, teamwork and communication skills.

14 Pyramid of Preventions and Interventions
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Program Change In-School Interventions In-Class Interventions In-School & In-Class Preventions Re-entry to School ALL SOME FEW The Pyramid of Interventions is being applied across Ontario and comes from the thinking of Rick Dufour. He suggests that with extra time and support and a explicit plan in place, students will not fall through the cracks. The more preventions and interventions that are invested at the bottom of the pyramid the less likely students will rise to the top of the pyramid, and become more at risk. Schools should develop their own strategies at each level of the pyramid. Ask participants to suggest where Student Voice is on the pyramid. Stress that the Student Voice initiative is NOT an intervention but a program for all students.

15 Learning Goals In this session participants are learning how to:
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE In this session participants are learning how to: explain student voice and why it is important to learning; access support and resources for Student Voice through colleagues, the board and the ministry; invite students to co-create environments that promote student engagement and use this important information for improving their learning. In the summer sessions, as in classrooms, all students work on the same overall learning goals based on the same curriculum expectations and their learning is assessed and evaluated using common success criteria.

16 Essential Questions What is the Student Voice Initiative?
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE What is the Student Voice Initiative? How might I invite students to co-create environments that promote student engagement in their learning? How do I increase my access to assistance and resources? By the end of the day session all participants will be able to answer the essential questions. Participants are reminded that they will all be able to answer the same questions and demonstrate the same learning goals but that they will be applying their learning in different ways back in their schools to meet their specific school context and student needs. Stress again that in a DI classroom all students work on the same learning goals / essential questions based on the curriculum expectations. They may learn and demonstrate their learning in different ways but the curriculum expectations and success criteria are the same for all learners Participants will develop/refine their answers to these three questions as they work through the module.

17 Making Connections Organizer
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Making Connections Session Learning Goals Note how your learning in each part of the session connects with the learning goal(s). Sample Success Criteria We are learning to explain student voice and why it is important to student learning. explain student voice and its connection to student engagement identify strategies to invite students to join the conversation about what engages them in their learning give examples of ways students have indicated helps strengthen their sense of belonging (classroom and school) and participation give examples of ways student voice connects to either overall curriculum expectations and/or four pillars of learning: Community Culture and Caring, Pathways, Literacy and Numeracy We are learning to access support and resources for Student Voice through colleagues, the board and the Ministry list the Student Voice resources know where to access the Student Voice supports and resources Navigate the Student Voice website to access related Ministry resources Network with colleagues We are learning how to invite students to co-create environments that promote student engagement? Support students in using SpeakUp in a Box for them to provide important information for improving their learning; Incorporate initiatives/structures into the classroom that promote student voice and provide students with opportunities to be partners in their own learning. Design tasks and use strategies such as Focused Dialogue, Final Word and other equitable structures for the emergence of different viewpoints and voices. The Making Connections Organizer (Handout 4) Participants can record their connections on this page. Encourage participants to revisit this organizer often throughout the session to make connections to their work.

18 Building Inclusion & Anchor Activity Debrief
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Strategy: Partner Introduction Instructions: Choose a partner from table group. Decide who will be the interviewer and who will be interviewed. For one minute, the interviewer will tell his/her partner all the things he/she does not know about his/her partner, including why she/he is taking the Student Voice Module and something interesting from the Anchor Activity. The partner being interviewed then responds for two minutes giving information they are comfortable sharing. Partners switch roles and repeat the strategy. Reform into a table group. Each set of partners introduce one another to the table group and share their partners reasons for the taking this module and one thing they found interesting from the Anchor Activity. Continue until everyone has been introduced to the table group by their partners. Ask table groups to introduce themselves to one another following the Partner Introduction strategy as described in this slide. Reinforce the importance of building inclusion in any new group as well as the importance for students to feel known, valued and respected in order to honestly ‘voice’ their opinions, ideas, questions and concerns.

19 Whole Group Debrief SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE What are some of the common and/or different reasons people are taking this module. What did you learn about each other? What did you learn about student voice from one another? Why is it important to build inclusion in any group? How do you build inclusion in your classrooms so that it is a safe/respectful place for students to express their voices? Debrief the partner introduction using these questions as a guide. Reinforce that many of the strategies used in today’s session have been successful with students and might be considered for use in their schools/classrooms. For further reading: Research for Teachers: Carl Rogers and classroom climate

20 Inviting Student Voices
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE What are you wondering about Student Voice or the SV Summer Program? View the Student Voice DVD. Reflect on the video by filling in responses to the BINGO template (Handout 5). Each group member shares a response for ONE box with table group. Bingo is a simple graphic organizer which can be used to focus listening and recording new information. The ultimate goal of the session is to move from knowing to doing; apply knowledge of Student Voice to plan and develop something that can be used in the school and classroom to increase the engagement of all learners.

21 BINGO FREE A reason students want to have a voice.
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE A reason students want to have a voice. One way students can have a voice in schools. One Ministry student voice resource. What is one of the 9 Student Voice Indicators? FREE What is MSAC? How you might use this DVD with your students? Something you found surprising in this DVD. Something you would like to try. Optional : Set personal learning goals based on the common learning goals because it helps participants take responsibility for their own learning. Shared responsibility for learning is a key feature of DI. Consider providing time for a discussion on the use of learning goals /goal setting with students.

22 Research & Student Engagement
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Student Engagement is a measure of the extent to which students: participate in academic and non-academic activities identify with and value schooling outcomes make a serious personal investment in their learning Defining what student engagement is. *This and the following slides draw upon the research of Dr. Doug Willms , with permission.

23 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE 25% prevalence of students with low engagement This is a world Ranking of PISA scores of students with low engagement, shows that Canada has a 25% disengagement. Also to show that Canada is not the only country who has this problem.

24 Socio-Economic Gradient
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Vertical axis are reading scores…majority of scores fall between level 2 and level 4. Horizontal Axis shows socioeconomic status, 0 is the average community. Blue dots private school Red and green are urban and rural public schools. Shows that economic status does not have a correlation to reading scores, i.e. a resilient youth in a poor community can succeed.

25 Socio-Economic Gradient
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Pink and light yellow are poor communities. Pie charts with large red and yellow sections have very disengaged/differently engaged students. Shows that there is a correlation between economic status of community and level of engagement….different to performance. Economic status effects engagement and engagement effects performance.

26 Socio-Economic Gradient
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Average Participation in Sports & Clubs 67% Longitudinal study that shows various trends. Interesting for comparisons between grades also can be used when thinking about how they’re school matches up and doesn’t match up to these trends.

27 Critical Learning Threshold
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Engagement is a function of development We must be aware of the developmental features of Student Voice. Student Voice is something that is enabled, not built. Students have the capacity to for thoughts and ideas, but cannot necessarily express them. They must first learn a common language, and be able to read and write in that language, before they can truly communicate. The research shows that students generally stop LEARNING to READ and instead are READING to LEARN by a certain critical threshold. Recognizing this critical threshold, we are able to identify the age at which empowerment, participation, engagement, and voice are in the best interests of the students development. Grade 7 onwards, self-determination is key.

28 Considering Flow 67% SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE
67% Beyond the traditional evaluation method (ie rubric), the research shows engagement begins with meaningful assessment. Considering learning factors such as flow, wherein a student self-assess their own strength of learning, will improve the classroom environment. We need to know how and when students learn best- graphs such as this help greatly.

29 Engagement as Learning Learning
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Learning Quality Instruction Enabling Content Time Learning is a function of engagement; engagement is a function of learning. We must understand that the EASIEST way to improve academic outcomes, important as they are, is to improve engagement levels. The research now shows unequivocally that students learn best when they have a sense of belonging and self-efficacy. This however, is a shift from the orthodoxy. Where before the two were separate, and learning prioritized above all, we must embed a culture which recognizes them as equal priorities. Engagement

30 Tell Them From Me Outcomes
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Outcomes thelearningbar.com 67% Drivers of Student Outcomes This is example of a self-assessment tool for students that reflects the shift in pedagogy. A holistic range of factors are considered when evaluating learning. Though a broad education methodology, this logic model shows how we can create measurable outcomes, and begin to link the research with evidence from our schools.

31 Raising the Bar SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE
Richer students do not necessarily perform better; richer schools do not necessarily do better. Engagement is an equalizer. When a student is engaged, they are equipped to succeed because self-efficacy is bolstered. We know the answer is not socio-economic, it is the far simpler, but perhaps unorthodox, solution found in first building a sense of belonging.

32 Students Said… SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE MSAC students were asked: “In order to increase student engagement in schools, principals, teachers and other school leaders should…” The top three responses from students were: Build a strong extra-curricular program that builds a sense of belonging, self-confidence& enjoyment of school, particularly for those students at risk. Encourage and support teachers to build strong relationships with students. Foster a teaching approach that includes designing learning tasks that are focused on students’ interests. MSAC Students undertook a Forced Choice Leadership Priorities roundtable activity at their first meeting on May 9th, They were provided with 13 leadership options to choose from, they were then encouraged to pick 7 priorities, with no reference to ranking, and then were asked to rank the 7 priorities in order of importance when compared to each other (from their perspective).

33 Students Said… Go to the response that interests you
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Go to the response that interests you Discuss response and how it relates to Dr. Willms research Share a thought with the larger group Activity: Post Student Responses on the walls Encourage participants to go to the response that interests them Discuss response and how it relates to Dr. Willms research Share thought with the larger group

34 Action SpeakUp – The Student Voice Initiative Overview
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE SpeakUp – The Student Voice Initiative Overview 9 Student Voice Indicators - Final Word Hart’s Ladder: Assessment of Student Participation – Read, Pair, Share Action Introducing new learning or extending/reinforcing prior learning Providing opportunities for practice and application of learning (guided – independent)

35 The Student Voice Initiative
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE SpeakUp’s Key Messages Involve students meaningfully in articulating what would help to strengthen their engagement in their learning environments, in which they are required to stay until age 18 or graduation (Bill 52). Ensure that all students feel a sense of belonging in their classrooms and in their school and are able to participate in decisions impacting on their educational experience; Re-engage students and close the gap in achievement for students who are not experiencing success, by learning more about how they learn and what helps them learn;

36 Regional Student Forums
Main Components SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Regional Student Forums SpeakUp Projects SpeakUp in a Box MSAC SpeakUp in a box – Classroom level – any student can apply for a kit SpeakUp Projects – Classroom/school level – any students can apply to run a project Regional Student Forums – Board level – students are either selected or express interest to attend Regional Student Forums Minister’s Student Advisory council (MSAC) – any student can apply – 60 student are appointed

37 Minister’s Student Advisory Council
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE INITIATIVE TERMS OF REFERENCE Provide ongoing student perspectives, recommendations, and consultations on the Ministry of Education’s policies, programs and practices Provide advice and feedback on the activities more specifically related to the Ministry’s student engagement activities Participate in student forums, events or conferences to discuss student-related issues Learn about strategic planning and the formation of government policy, programs and practices The Council is composed of: 60 students from each of the 6 regions and 3 francophone regions to represent students’ diverse backgrounds: Students grades 7-12 Students with special needs English Language Learners A range of engaged to disengaged and recently re-engaged students Students not in school Reserved membership for representatives from the OSTA (3) and FESFO (3) *Over 600 students applied for a seat on the MSAC

38 Regional Student Forums
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE One-day consultations with students to share ideas on how to respect all students’ voices and how to strengthen their engagement in learning. The 9 Student Voice Indicators, which drive the Student Voice Initiative, emerged from Regional Forums in 2009. In 2011, the focus for discussion was student councils and how they can strengthen engagement academically among all students and hear all students’ voices. A diversity of students selected from a range of destinations and levels of engagement, grades, gender, non-traditional leaders, those on student students council or not, student trustees, and MSAC members).

39 9 Student Voice Indicators
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE 1. Based on students’ interests, expand the available extra-curricular options to include enrichment, peer support, academic support and activities. 2. Make more explicit the strategies designed to support student learning of life skills (e.g. leadership, teamwork, communication). 3. Ensure the learning environment is inclusive socially (i.e. opportunities to talk about issues such as mental health, bullying, racism, diversity, inclusion) 4. Ensure the learning environment is inclusive academically (i.e. teachers know the individual students and their learning styles, what helps and hinders their learning). 5. Build on the SpeakUp to ensure all students feel welcomed and empowered in their schools. 6. Provide students with the opportunity to give feedback on their learning experience in order to achieve success. 7. Consult students and inform them on decisions that impact their educational experience. 8. Ensure students’ experience of education is equitable wherever they live in Ontario (i.e. curriculum, classroom materials, and qualified teachers). 9. Commit to ensuring eco-friendly practises in their schools and classrooms (i.e. composting, recycling, green roofs, and healthier food options). Dr. Willms’ research connects students sense of belonging and opportunities to participate both academically and socially as indicators of student engagement. Dr. Ferguson’s Early School Leavers report indicates that a sense of belonging acts as a protective factor for students at risk. The Transition Research emphasizes Being, Belonging and Becoming Indicator #6: John Hattie in Visible Learning sights that is important for teachers and students to seek and give feedback and for teachers to adapt teaching as a result of feedback from learners.

40 SpeakUp Projects SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE INITIATIVE Grants for student-led projects (up to $1000 per project) Student-led projects that focus on strengthening engagement in the under-engaged are the priority Over 4000 student-led SpeakUp projects, in 900 schools, have received grants since projects were approved in Applications for will be posted on in the fall of 2011.

41 2010-2011 SpeakUp Project Examples
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE The Ideas Exchange: Student Education - Student Action, a city-wide conference in an alternative education setting Saving Our Selves, a teen health and wellness fair IMPACT- Random acts of kindness, a campaign to abolish bullying and create a safe school environment through positive actions

42 SpeakUp in a Box SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE SpeakUp in a Box contains everything needed for 30 students to discuss: What helps you engage in your learning? What holds you back from engaging in your learning? What can adults do to improve how education looks and feels? What can students do to improve how education looks and feels? Students are to share their ideas with staff and the Ministry. They may apply for a grant to lead a SpeakUp project designed as a result of what they learned. Students and teachers may request a kit by ing: *Thanks to Speak Out Alberta for sharing their idea.

43 Student Voice Success Criteria
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE School boards and schools establish a process for consulting and communicating the outcome of the consultation about decisions that impact on them Including all students in the provision for student voice, not just those who are on student council or most comfortable expressing their voice. Visible teaching involves: Making learning the explicit goal Sharing challenging learning intentions and success criteria Seeking and giving feedback; Adapting teaching as a result of feedback from learners Planning interventions that deliberately encourage mastery of these intentions Visible learning involves students: Being committed to and open to learning Being involved in setting challenging learning intentions and success criteria Seeking feedback from learning SV Indicators represent the feedback of over 1500 students from across Ontario on what helps strengthen their engagement and ensures all voices are heard. SV Indicator #6: Allow students to give feedback on their learning experiences in order to achieve success.

44 Take Five SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Take a few moments to re-read the Student Voice Initiative and Principals Want to Know handouts with your new understanding of the Student Voice Initiative main components: MSAC SpeakUp Projects Regional Student Forums 9 Student Indicators SpeakUp in a Box Student Voice Success Criteria Take a moment to jot down some emerging ideas in your Making Connections organizer. Explain it is important to provide opportunities for participants to pause, reflect, make and record some connections. Participants may use their ‘Making Connections’ organizer or record ideas as they wish.

45 Hart’s Ladder - Read, Pair, Share
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Read Read through Hart’s Ladder on levels of Student Engagement. Consider where you would place your school today. Pair, share Share with a partner your thoughts about how you could infuse one or more of the Ministry’s Student Voice initiatives to move your school ‘up the ladder’. Distribute Handout 7 – Hart’s Ladder. Optional background information on the Hart’s Ladder of Children’s Participation. About the Ladder: Sociologist Roger Hart wrote a book called Children's Participation: The Theory And Practice Of Involving Young Citizens In Community Development And Environmental Care for UNICEF in 1997.  This groundbreaking work put the work of young people and adult allies around the world in the context of a global movement for participation, offering needed guidance and criticism of many efforts. The "Ladder of Children's Participation," also called the "Ladder of Youth Participation," is one of many significant tools from the book. This ladder can be used to self-assess the level of student engagement within schools and/or classrooms. Facilitate a 8-12 minute ‘read, pair, share’ within table groups or with other partners in the room if you feel it would be beneficial to extend discussions outside of table groups.

46 Types of Engagement SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE
8) Young people-initiated, shared decisions with adults Projects or programs are initiated by young people and decision-making is shared between young people and adults. These projects empower young people while at the same time enabling them to access and learn from the life experience and expertise of adults. 7) Young people-initiated and directed Young people initiate and direct a project or program. Adults are involved only in a supportive role. 6) Adult-initiated, shared decisions with young people Projects or programs are initiated by adults but the decision-making is shared with the young people. 5) Consulted and informed Young people give advice on projects or programs designed and run by adults. The young people are informed about how their input will be used and the outcomes of the decisions made by adults. 4) Assigned but informed Young people are assigned a specific role and informed about how and why they are being involved. 3) Tokenism Young people appear to be given a voice, but in fact have little or no choice about what they do or how they participate. 2) Decoration Young people are used to help or "bolster" a cause in a relatively indirect way, although adults do not pretend that the cause is inspired by young people.   1) Manipulation Adults use young people to support causes and pretend that the causes are inspired by young people.   Adapted from Hart, R. (1992) Overview of 8 steps on Hart’s Ladder. Facilitate group discussion of any of these steps if participants to clarify the ‘ladder’ process and ‘step’ descriptions. NOTE: Hart’s Ladder represents just one approach of deconstructing engagement and analyzing its various forms. While the image of a ladder is a powerful one, we must remember that student engagement does not necessarily reflect a hierarchy. The key point of this slide is that ‘engagement’ is not an end in itself; we must learn to be explicit about the nature and quality of the engagement we are seeking. In other words, meaningful engagement need not always take the form of step 8 because other steps may be more appropriate for the context.

47 Consolidation Exploring SpeakUp in a Box Making Connections Organizer
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Exploring SpeakUp in a Box Making Connections Organizer Suggested further reading Student Voice Module - Conclusion Consolidation Helping students demonstrate what they have learned Providing opportunities for consolidation and reflection

48 Unpacking SpeakUp in a Box
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE As a whole group, discuss: Has anyone had the opportunity to use this resource? If yes, how has it been used in your school? What connections can you make between this resource and overall curriculum expectations and/or four pillars of learning: Community Culture and Caring, Pathways, Literacy and Numeracy? Distribute the ‘Speakup in a Box’ resource kits to each participant. SpeakUp in a Box was developed as a response to students stated interest in hosting forums in their own school. Alberta’s Speak Out initiative, which Ontario advised generously, shared their concept in return. SpeakUp in a Box asks the following questions to small groups of students who discuss in roundtable format. What helps you engage in your learning? What holds you back from engaging in your learning? What can adults do to improve how education looks and feels? What can students do to improve how education looks and feels? All the materials are provided including: Instructions for Host Facilitator Instructions for Table Facilitator Ice-breaker instructions DVD for the Student Voice initiative overview Post-its for clustering ideas Dots for dotmocracy Name tags, Tent cards, pens Step by step instructions Brown envelope and post card to send back to the Ministry of Education so they can learn more about what students’ ideas are. Time for forum: 2 hours #’s of students: 30 Focus: Students in Grades 7-12

49 Consolidation Task In table groups: Explore the Speakup in a Box
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE In table groups: Explore the Speakup in a Box Discuss ideas for using it in schools Identify a ‘first’ next step to share with principals, students and school communities in September

50 Making Connections-Take 5
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Take 5 minutes to return to your Making Connections Template. Fill in information, ideas, insights & questions that you would like to take into this afternoon’s meeting and/or back to your schools in September. Invite participants to record new information and emerging ideas, insights and questions on the Making Connections organizer. They can bring these into the afternoon session as they begin the process of exploring opportunities for Student Voice initiatives in their board and schools.

51 Suggested Reading REFERENCES SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE
Bragg, S., (2007). Consulting young people: a review of the literature. Creative Partnerships. Levin, B., (2000). Putting students at the centre in education reform. International Journal of Educational Change, 1(2), https://www.creative-partnerships.com/data/files/consulting-young-people-13.pdf 155–172. Levin, B & Pekrul, S., (2007). Building Student Voice for School Improvement. In D. Thiessen & A. Cook-Sather (Eds.), International Handbook of Student Experience in Elementary and Secondary School, 711–726. Cook-Sather, A., (2007).What Would Happen if We Treated Students as Those With Opinions That Matter? The Benefits to Principals and Teachers of Supporting Youth Engagement in School, NASSP Bulletin, 91, 343. Mitra, D., (2007). Student Voice in School Reform: from Listening to Leadership. In D. Thiessen & A. Cook-Sather (Eds.), International Handbook of Student Experience in Elementary and Secondary School, 727–744. Ferguson, B. & Tilleczek, K., Boydell, K., Rummens, J. A., (2005). Early School Leavers: Understanding the Lived Reality of Student Disengagement from Secondary School, Ontario Ministry of Education. Oldfather, P., (1995). Songs “come back most to them”: Students’ experiences as researchers Theory into Practice, 34(2), 131. Fielding, M., (2004). Transformative approaches to student voice: Theoretical underpinnings, recalcitrant realities. British Educational Research Journal, 30(2), 295–311. Rudduck, J., Chaplain, R., & Wallace, G., (1996). School Improvement: What Pupils Can Tell Us? David Fulton Publishers Ltd., London. Fielding, M & Bragg, S., (2003). Students as Researchers, Making a Difference. Cambridge: Pearson Publishing. Rudduck, J., (2007). Student Voice, Student Engagement, and School Reform. In D. Thiessen & A. Cook-Sather (Eds.), International Handbook of Student Experience in Elementary and Secondary School, Flutter, J. and Rudduck, J. (2004) Consulting Pupils: What’s in it for Schools?, London: RoutledgeFalmer Hattie, J., (2009) Visible Learning, A Synthesis of over 800 Meta-Analyses relating to Achievement, Routledge, New York, N.Y. (p. 118) and p. 173) Willms, J.D. (2003) Student Engagement at School: a sense of belonging and participation: Results from PISA Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. p. 34. Distribute Handout #8 and explain it is optional additional reading and current research.

52 Conclusion SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE Students cannot Speak Up alone. How can teachers and administrators enrich a shared conversation with students in schools? Thanks to all facilitators and participants for their participation!

53 Feedback THANK YOU! Please provide session feedback
SS/L-18ITEB STUDENT VOICE MODULE THANK YOU! Please provide session feedback using the online survey link provided by your facilitator.

54


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