Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Anchor Activity 1 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Check Out the Student Voice Handouts As we wait for people to arrive:  Read through Student Voice.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Anchor Activity 1 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Check Out the Student Voice Handouts As we wait for people to arrive:  Read through Student Voice."— Presentation transcript:

1 Anchor Activity 1 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Check Out the Student Voice Handouts As we wait for people to arrive:  Read through Student Voice Initiative One-Pager and/or the Principals Want to Know handout(s)  Complete the Anchor Activity: Ticket in the Door alone or with a partner Review the Student Voice Initiative handout and complete the sentences: Student voice is… I am (we are) familiar with… Student voice is evident in my (our) school(s) and classrooms by… A goal I have today is… I’d (we’d) like to learn more about…

2 Student Success Learning to 18 Student Voice Module Summer Program Summer 2011

3 Student Voice Summer Program SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Focus for Student Voice Module: “How might we invite students to co-create their learning communities?” Introduction to Student Voice Initiate exploration of…

4 Materials Review 4 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE *Required For Student Voice Module* 1.Handouts 1 & 2 – Student Voice Initiative one-pager, Principals Want to Know newsletter 2.Handout 3 - Ticket in the Door 3.Handout 4 - Making Connections Organizer 4.Handout 5 – BINGO Recording Sheet 5.Handout 6 – 9 Student Voice Indicators 6.Handout 7 – Hart’s Ladder 7.Handout 8 – Suggested Further Reading 8.SpeakUp in a Box –one for each participant

5 Module Agenda 5 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Minds On – Setting the stage – the provincial context – Learning Goals/Essential Questions – Introduction Activity / Debriefing Anchor Activity – Inviting Student Voices - Student Voice DVD – Research & Student Engagement – Students Said Activity Action – The Student Voice Initiative Overview – Hart’s Ladder: Assessment of Student Participation – Read, Pair, Share Activity Consolidation – Exploring SpeakUp in a Box – Making Connections Organizer – Suggested further reading – Student Voice Module Conclusion 1 2 3

6 Minds On 6 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE  Setting the Stage – the provincial context  Learning Goals/Essential Questions  Introduction Activity / Debriefing Anchor Activity  Inviting Student Voices - Student Voice DVD  Research & Student Engagement – Students Said Activity

7 Provincial Context 7 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE High Levels of Student Achievement Reducing the Gaps in Student Achievement Increased Public Confidence in Our Publicly Funded Schools Core priorities:

8 School Effectiveness Framework 8 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE

9 School Effectiveness Framework 9 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Student Voice and the School Effectiveness Framework 3.1 The teaching and learning environment is inclusive and reflects individual student strengths, needs and learning preferences. 3.2 School programs incorporate students’ stated priorities and reflect the diversity, needs and interests of the school population. 3.3 Students are partners in conversations about school improvement. 3.4 Explicit strategies are in place to enable students to demonstrate strong citizenship skills such as leadership, teamwork and advocacy. A Support For School Improvement And Student Success * /literacynumeracy/Framework_ english.pdf

10 Supporting the Instructional Core 10 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Leading Learning – leadership

11 Example 11 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Board (BIPSA) School (SIPSA) Classroom (planning for teaching and learning) Professional Learning Cycle (collaborative inquiry) Host a forum involving students to gather feedback on the 4 pillars Students host a forum using SpeakUp in a Box to identify what helps and hinders their learning and their ideas about what adults and students can do. Senior Social Science course Action Research using collaborative inquiry: (Plan, Act, Observe, Reflect)For example: Divide into a project team of 3 or 4 students. You are a team of policy advisers in the Ministry of Education in Ontario. Along with several other teams in the province, you have been assigned to conduct original research into student engagement among students in Grades etc.

12 A Professional Learning Cycle 12 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE

13 Student Success Grades 7-12 Key Elements 13 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE PROGRAMS o Specialist High Skills Major o Dual Credits o Expanded Cooperative Education o Ontario Skills Passport o Board Specific Programs LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT o Student Success Leaders o Student Success Teachers o Student Success School and Cross Panel Teams EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTION o Differentiated Instruction o Math GAINS o Literacy GAINS o Professional Learning Cycle o Student Voice o School Effectiveness Framework INTERVENTIONS o Credit Rescue / Recovery o Transitions Supports/Taking Stock o Children and Youth in Care o Re-engagement Strategy o Supervised Alternative Learning o School Support Initiative

14 Pyramid of Preventions and Interventions 14 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE ALL SOME FEW Program Change In-School Interventions In-Class Interventions In-School & In-Class Preventions Re-entry to School

15 Learning Goals 15 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE In this session participants are learning how to:  explain student voice and why it is important to learning;  access support and resources for Student Voice through colleagues, the board and the ministry;  invite students to co-create environments that promote student engagement and use this important information for improving their learning.

16 Essential Questions 16 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE 1.What is the Student Voice Initiative? 2.How might I invite students to co-create environments that promote student engagement in their learning? 3.How do I increase my access to assistance and resources?

17 Making Connections Organizer 17 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Making Connections Session Learning Goals Note how your learning in each part of the session connects with the learning goal(s). Sample Success Criteria We are learning to explain student voice and why it is important to student learning.  explain student voice and its connection to student engagement  identify strategies to invite students to join the conversation about what engages them in their learning  give examples of ways students have indicated helps strengthen their sense of belonging (classroom and school) and participation  give examples of ways student voice connects to either overall curriculum expectations and/or four pillars of learning: Community Culture and Caring, Pathways, Literacy and Numeracy We are learning to access support and resources for Student Voice through colleagues, the board and the Ministry  list the Student Voice resources  know where to access the Student Voice supports and resources  Navigate the Student Voice website to access related Ministry resources  Network with colleagues We are learning how to invite students to co-create environments that promote student engagement?  Support students in using SpeakUp in a Box for them to provide important information for improving their learning;  Incorporate initiatives/structures into the classroom that promote student voice and provide students with opportunities to be partners in their own learning.  Design tasks and use strategies such as Focused Dialogue, Final Word and other equitable structures for the emergence of different viewpoints and voices.

18 Building Inclusion & Anchor Activity Debrief 18 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Strategy: Partner Introduction Instructions: 1.Choose a partner from table group. Decide who will be the interviewer and who will be interviewed. For one minute, the interviewer will tell his/her partner all the things he/she does not know about his/her partner, including why she/he is taking the Student Voice Module and something interesting from the Anchor Activity. The partner being interviewed then responds for two minutes giving information they are comfortable sharing. 2.Partners switch roles and repeat the strategy. 3.Reform into a table group. Each set of partners introduce one another to the table group and share their partners reasons for the taking this module and one thing they found interesting from the Anchor Activity. Continue until everyone has been introduced to the table group by their partners.

19 Whole Group Debrief 19 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE What are some of the common and/or different reasons people are taking this module. What did you learn about each other? What did you learn about student voice from one another? Why is it important to build inclusion in any group? How do you build inclusion in your classrooms so that it is a safe/respectful place for students to express their voices?

20 Inviting Student Voices 20 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE View the Student Voice DVD. Reflect on the video by filling in responses to the BINGO template (Handout 5). Each group member shares a response for ONE box with table group. What are you wondering about Student Voice or the SV Summer Program?

21 BINGO 21 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE A reason students want to have a voice. One way students can have a voice in schools. One Ministry student voice resource. What is one of the 9 Student Voice Indicators? FREE What is MSAC? How you might use this DVD with your students? Something you found surprising in this DVD. Something you would like to try.

22 Research & Student Engagement 22 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE participate in academic and non- academic activities identify with and value schooling outcomes make a serious personal investment in their learning Student Engagement is a measure of the extent to which students: * This and the following slides draw upon the research of Dr. Doug Willms, with permission.

23 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 23 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE 25% prevalence of students with low engagement

24 Socio-Economic Gradient 24 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE

25 Socio-Economic Gradient 25 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE

26 Socio-Economic Gradient 26 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Average Participation in Sports & Clubs 67%

27 Critical Learning Threshold 27 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Engagement is a function of development

28 Considering Flow 28 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE 67%

29 Engagement as Learning 29 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Learning Quality Instruction Enabling Content Time Engagement

30 Tell Them From Me 30 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE 67% Outcomes Drivers of Student Outcomes thelearningbar.com

31 Raising the Bar 31 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE

32 Students Said… 32 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE MSAC students were asked: “In order to increase student engagement in schools, principals, teachers and other school leaders should…” The top three responses from students were: 1.Build a strong extra-curricular program that builds a sense of belonging, self-confidence& enjoyment of school, particularly for those students at risk. 2.Encourage and support teachers to build strong relationships with students. 3.Foster a teaching approach that includes designing learning tasks that are focused on students’ interests.

33 Go to the response that interests you Discuss response and how it relates to Dr. Willms research Share a thought with the larger group Students Said… 33 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE

34 Action 34 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE  SpeakUp – The Student Voice Initiative Overview  9 Student Voice Indicators - Final Word  Hart’s Ladder: Assessment of Student Participation – Read, Pair, Share

35 The Student Voice Initiative 35 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE SpeakUp’s Key Messages I nvolve students meaningfully in articulating what would help to strengthen their engagement in their learning environments, in which they are required to stay until age 18 or graduation (Bill 52). E nsure that all students feel a sense of belonging in their classrooms and in their school and are able to participate in decisions impacting on their educational experience; R e-engage students and close the gap in achievement for students who are not experiencing success, by learning more about how they learn and what helps them learn;

36 Main Components 36 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Regional Student Forums SpeakUp Projects SpeakUp in a Box MSAC

37 Minister’s Student Advisory Council 37 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE INITIATIVE Provide advice and feedback on the activities more specifically related to the Ministry’s student engagement activities Participate in student forums, events or conferences to discuss student-related issues Learn about strategic planning and the formation of government policy, programs and practices The Council is composed of: 60 students from each of the 6 regions and 3 francophone regions to represent students’ diverse backgrounds: o Students grades 7-12 o Students with special needs o English Language Learners o A range of engaged to disengaged and recently re-engaged students o Students not in school o Reserved membership for representatives from the OSTA (3) and FESFO (3) Provide ongoing student perspectives, recommendations, and consultations on the Ministry of Education’s policies, programs and practices * Over 600 students applied for a seat on the MSAC TERMS OF REFERENCE

38 Regional Student Forums 38 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE One-day consultations with students to share ideas on how to respect all students’ voices and how to strengthen their engagement in learning. The 9 Student Voice Indicators, which drive the Student Voice Initiative, emerged from Regional Forums in In 2011, the focus for discussion was student councils and how they can strengthen engagement academically among all students and hear all students’ voices. A diversity of students selected from a range of destinations and levels of engagement, grades, gender, non-traditional leaders, those on student students council or not, student trustees, and MSAC members).

39 9 Student Voice Indicators 39 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE 1. Based on students’ interests, expand the available extra-curricular options to include enrichment, peer support, academic support and activities. 2. Make more explicit the strategies designed to support student learning of life skills (e.g. leadership, teamwork, communication). 3. Ensure the learning environment is inclusive socially (i.e. opportunities to talk about issues such as mental health, bullying, racism, diversity, inclusion) 4. Ensure the learning environment is inclusive academically (i.e. teachers know the individual students and their learning styles, what helps and hinders their learning). 5. Build on the SpeakUp to ensure all students feel welcomed and empowered in their schools. 6. Provide students with the opportunity to give feedback on their learning experience in order to achieve success. 7. Consult students and inform them on decisions that impact their educational experience. 8. Ensure students’ experience of education is equitable wherever they live in Ontario (i.e. curriculum, classroom materials, and qualified teachers). 9. Commit to ensuring eco-friendly practises in their schools and classrooms (i.e. composting, recycling, green roofs, and healthier food options).

40 Grants for student-led projects (up to $1000 per project) Student-led projects that focus on strengthening engagement in the under-engaged are the priority Over 4000 student-led SpeakUp projects, in 900 schools, have received grants since projects were approved in Applications for will be posted on in the fall of SpeakUp Projects 40 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE INITIATIVE

41 SpeakUp Project Examples 41 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE The Ideas Exchange: Student Education - Student Action, a city-wide conference in an alternative education setting Saving Our Selves, a teen health and wellness fair IMPACT- Random acts of kindness, a campaign to abolish bullying and create a safe school environment through positive actions

42 SpeakUp in a Box 42 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE SpeakUp in a Box contains everything needed for 30 students to discuss: 1.What helps you engage in your learning? 2.What holds you back from engaging in your learning? 3.What can adults do to improve how education looks and feels? 4.What can students do to improve how education looks and feels? Students are to share their ideas with staff and the Ministry. They may apply for a grant to lead a SpeakUp project designed as a result of what they learned. Students and teachers may request a kit by ing: *Thanks to Speak Out Alberta for sharing their idea.

43 Student Voice Success Criteria 43 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE School boards and schools establish a process for consulting and communicating the outcome of the consultation about decisions that impact on them – Including all students in the provision for student voice, not just those who are on student council or most comfortable expressing their voice. Visible teaching involves: – Making learning the explicit goal – Sharing challenging learning intentions and success criteria – Seeking and giving feedback; – Adapting teaching as a result of feedback from learners – Planning interventions that deliberately encourage mastery of these intentions Visible learning involves students: – Being committed to and open to learning – Being involved in setting challenging learning intentions and success criteria – Seeking feedback from learning

44 Take Five 44 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Take a few moments to re-read the Student Voice Initiative and Principals Want to Know handouts with your new understanding of the Student Voice Initiative main components:  MSAC  SpeakUp Projects  Regional Student Forums  9 Student Indicators  SpeakUp in a Box  Student Voice Success Criteria Take a moment to jot down some emerging ideas in your Making Connections organizer.

45 Hart’s Ladder - Read, Pair, Share 45 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Read Read through Hart’s Ladder on levels of Student Engagement. Consider where you would place your school today. Pair, share Share with a partner your thoughts about how you could infuse one or more of the Ministry’s Student Voice initiatives to move your school ‘up the ladder’.

46 Types of Engagement 46 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE 8) Young people-initiated, shared decisions with adults Projects or programs are initiated by young people and decision-making is shared between young people and adults. These projects empower young people while at the same time enabling them to access and learn from the life experience and expertise of adults. 7) Young people-initiated and directed Young people initiate and direct a project or program. Adults are involved only in a supportive role. 6) Adult-initiated, shared decisions with young people Projects or programs are initiated by adults but the decision-making is shared with the young people. 5) Consulted and informed Young people give advice on projects or programs designed and run by adults. The young people are informed about how their input will be used and the outcomes of the decisions made by adults. 4) Assigned but informed Young people are assigned a specific role and informed about how and why they are being involved. 3) Tokenism Young people appear to be given a voice, but in fact have little or no choice about what they do or how they participate. 2) Decoration Young people are used to help or "bolster" a cause in a relatively indirect way, although adults do not pretend that the cause is inspired by young people. 1) Manipulation Adults use young people to support causes and pretend that the causes are inspired by young people. Adapted from Hart, R. (1992)

47 Consolidation 47 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE  Exploring SpeakUp in a Box  Making Connections Organizer  Suggested further reading  Student Voice Module - Conclusion

48 Unpacking SpeakUp in a Box 48 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE As a whole group, discuss:  Has anyone had the opportunity to use this resource?  If yes, how has it been used in your school?  What connections can you make between this resource and overall curriculum expectations and/or four pillars of learning: Community Culture and Caring, Pathways, Literacy and Numeracy?

49 Consolidation Task 49 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE In table groups:  Explore the Speakup in a Box  Discuss ideas for using it in schools  Identify a ‘first’ next step to share with principals, students and school communities in September

50 Making Connections-Take 5 50 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Take 5 minutes to return to your Making Connections Template. Fill in information, ideas, insights & questions that you would like to take into this afternoon’s meeting and/or back to your schools in September.

51 Suggested Reading 51 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Bragg, S., (2007). Consulting young people: a review of the literature. Creative Partnerships. https://www.creative-partnerships.com/data/files/consulting- young-people-13.pdf Cook-Sather, A., (2007).What Would Happen if We Treated Students as Those With Opinions That Matter? The Benefits to Principals and Teachers of Supporting Youth Engagement in School, NASSP Bulletin, 91, 343. Ferguson, B. & Tilleczek, K., Boydell, K., Rummens, J. A., (2005). Early School Leavers: Understanding the Lived Reality of Student Disengagement from Secondary School, Ontario Ministry of Education. Fielding, M., (2004). Transformative approaches to student voice: Theoretical underpinnings, recalcitrant realities. British Educational Research Journal, 30(2), 295–311. Fielding, M & Bragg, S., (2003). Students as Researchers, Making a Difference. Cambridge: Pearson Publishing. Flutter, J. and Rudduck, J. (2004) Consulting Pupils: What’s in it for Schools?, London: RoutledgeFalmer Hattie, J., (2009) Visible Learning, A Synthesis of over 800 Meta- Analyses relating to Achievement, Routledge, New York, N.Y. (p. 118) and p. 173) Levin, B., (2000). Putting students at the centre in education reform. International Journal of Educational Change, 1(2), 155–172. Levin, B & Pekrul, S., (2007). Building Student Voice for School Improvement. In D. Thiessen & A. Cook-Sather (Eds.), International Handbook of Student Experience in Elementary and Secondary School, 711–726. Mitra, D., (2007). Student Voice in School Reform: from Listening to Leadership. In D. Thiessen & A. Cook-Sather (Eds.), International Handbook of Student Experience in Elementary and Secondary School, 727–744. Oldfather, P., (1995). Songs “come back most to them”: Students’ experiences as researchers Theory into Practice, 34(2), 131. Rudduck, J., Chaplain, R., & Wallace, G., (1996). School Improvement: What Pupils Can Tell Us? David Fulton Publishers Ltd., London. Rudduck, J., (2007). Student Voice, Student Engagement, and School Reform. In D. Thiessen & A. Cook-Sather (Eds.), International Handbook of Student Experience in Elementary and Secondary School, Willms, J.D. (2003) Student Engagement at School: a sense of belonging and participation: Results from PISA Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. p. 34. REFERENCES

52 Conclusion 52 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Students cannot Speak Up alone. How can teachers and administrators enrich a shared conversation with students in schools?

53 Feedback 53 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Please provide session feedback using the online survey link provided by your facilitator. THANK YOU!

54


Download ppt "Anchor Activity 1 SS/L-18ITEB 2011 STUDENT VOICE MODULE Check Out the Student Voice Handouts As we wait for people to arrive:  Read through Student Voice."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google