Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Realizing Results: Integrating Early Childhood Outcomes (ECO) with the IEP 31 st Annual KDEC Conference February 28, 2013 Wichita, Kansas Presented by.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Realizing Results: Integrating Early Childhood Outcomes (ECO) with the IEP 31 st Annual KDEC Conference February 28, 2013 Wichita, Kansas Presented by."— Presentation transcript:

1 Realizing Results: Integrating Early Childhood Outcomes (ECO) with the IEP 31 st Annual KDEC Conference February 28, 2013 Wichita, Kansas Presented by Phoebe Rinkel, M.S., TASN-KITS Chelie Nelson, Ph.D. TASN-KITS Tiffany Smith, M.S., KSDE

2 The New Frontier for Early Childhood The goals of the IDEA are no longer simply to ensure that services are available for children with disabilities and their families but also to demonstrate that those children and families are achieving positive outcomes as a result of participating in them. This is the new frontier for all early childhood programs (Hebbeler, 2008).

3 Session Objectives Understand the connections among – Functional assessment – Developing meaningful IEP Goals – Measuring the 3 global child outcomes Identify benefits and challenges of integrating ECO with IEP process Begin program self-assessment and planning for integration of ECO with IEP process Leave with resources to support your efforts to improve practices and outcomes for children

4 First articulated by the ECO Center stakeholders group in 2004, this goal recently was adopted by the expert workgroup that created the 2012 Key Practices Underlying the IEP Process: The overarching goal of preschool special education is to enable young children to be active and successful participants in home, school and community settings resulting in positive outcomes for children and their families. 4 Goal of Preschool Special Education

5 1)Positive social emotional skills (including positive social relationships) 2)Acquisition and use of knowledge and skills (including early language/communication and for preschool, literacy) 3)Use of appropriate behaviors to meet their needs ECO Center, Global Child Outcomes of Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education

6 Integrating ECO into the IFSP/IEP process to support improved practices, measurement, and positive outcomes for children and families Understanding and using ECO data for program improvement Refining the process for measuring and reporting ECO Developing guidance & training to support local teams in -use of approved curriculum based assessment -completing the Child Outcomes Summary Form -entering COSF data into the Outcomes Web System Designing the process for measuring and reporting ECO to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) Implementation Timeline for Kansas ECO

7 Developing High-Quality, Functional IFSP Outcomes and IEP Goals Developing High-Quality, Functional IFSP Outcomes and IEP Goals ath/ifspoutcomes- iepgoals/ifspoutcomes-iepgoals.asp ath/ifspoutcomes- iepgoals/ifspoutcomes-iepgoals.asp presented in collaboration with

8 8 Goal Understand the connections among: Functional Assessment Developing meaningful IEP Goals Measuring the 3 global child outcomes

9 Functional assessment is the means by which we accomplish an integrated process, including developing individual outcomes/goals as well as determining the rating for each of the three global child outcomes. 9 Making the Connection: Using Functional Assessment

10 Assessment of the young child’s skills in the real life contexts of family, culture and community rather than discrete isolated tasks irrelevant to daily life 10 “the science of the strange behavior of children, with strange adults, in strange settings for the briefest possible period of time.” Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979) What is Functional Assessment?

11 Our Focus Shifts FromTo Knows how to make eye contact, smile, and give a hug Initiates affection toward caregivers and respond to others’ affection Knows how to imitate a gesture when prompted by others Watches what a peer says or does and incorporate it into his/her own play Uses finger in pointing motion Points to indicate needs or wants Shows a skill in a specific situation Uses a skill in actions across settings and situations to accomplish something meaningful to the child 11 Functional Assessment

12 Families and familiar, knowledgeable caregivers in the child’s life Providers Teachers Others, less familiar, can also contribute 12 Who performs Functional Assessment?

13 Over time: “One-time observations even in the natural context, are insufficient and often misleading.” 13 When is Functional Assessment performed? Bagnato, S.J., Neisworth, J.T., & Pretti-Frontczak, K.( 2010)

14 Knowing the purpose for the assessment is important Observation is essential: keep a focus on being objective vs. subjective Record keeping is key: qualitative vs. quantitative Hearing from others who know the child is critical—involve families! 14 How is Functional Assessment Performed?

15 Listen to the family story Observe and ask about the child’s day-to-day routines and activities related to -Social interactions -Engagement -Independence Ask parents to show or describe Observe how the parent engages the child Observe the child in play 15 Involving Families

16 Only in the children’s natural everyday settings, activities, and routines 16 Where is Functional Assessment performed?

17 Functional Assessment is Authentic The more realistic or natural the task, – the more motivated the child – the more applicable it is to everyday events and situations Authentic tasks and circumstances reinforce – competency-based approach to the education of young children – assessment of all disciplines across complex skills and processes – generalization of learning across settings Delaney, E. (1999)

18 Functional Assessment is Authentic Authentic tasks require the assessor to make no inferences about a child's capabilities, because the behaviors sampled are directly observable. Delaney, E. (1999)

19 19 “Everything that can be measured counts, but not everything that counts can be measured.” Usefulness of Conventional Assessment: To distinguish typical from atypical performance To provide one more source of information Conventional Assessment

20 Yields a real picture of the child Guides identification of functional individualized outcomes and goals Supports strengths- based approach 20 Why is Functional Fundamental?

21 21 Goal Understand the connections among: Functional Assessment Developing meaningful IEP Goals Measuring the 3 global child outcomes

22 2012 – 2013 IEP Training for Kansas Schools Kansas State Department of Education Technical Assistance System Network Early Childhood: Writing IEPs for Young Children hp/iep-training-coaching- resources

23 Linking the IEP and ECO Process

24 Using Information from the DBRF to Develop PLAAFP Age- appropriate skills/ behaviors Immediate foundational skills/behavio rs (3-6 months delay) Skills/behavi ors of much younger child

25 Using Information from the DBRF to Develop PLAAFP

26 Example Outcome 2: Acquire and Use of Knowledge and Skills Outcome 2: Acquiring and using knowledge and skills. Johnny has acquired some beginning concept knowledge. He is able to classify objects by size and basic attribute, name colors, understand beginning concepts (colors, size, prepositions), name 5 letters of his name, and count up to two objects correctly. He is beginning to create representational drawings, cut out shapes with straight lines, and is able to write three letters of his first name. When listening to a story or talking about immediate events, he is able to answer simple factual questions. Johnny has more difficulty with tasks that are less concrete. When given 2 or 3 step directions, Johnny will follow the first step but requires adult support for the remainder of the steps. This makes it difficult for Johnny to function independently within a preschool classroom. He has difficulty asking questions and answering “how” and “why” questions. During a small group story time, Johnny answered 1 of 6 “how/why” questions asked about the story, which indicates Johnny has difficulty with story comprehension.

27 Making Additional Connections Between ECO Ratings and PLAAFP In the area of acquiring and using knowledge and skills, Johnny is demonstrating many age appropriate skills as well as functioning that shows immediate foundational skills. Johnny also exhibits a significant number of skills in this area that are more like those of a much younger child.

28 Selecting Functional High-Priority Goals Things child can learn from a responsive teacher and other children in a quality early childhood environment Things child can learn given special materials, extra attention, and practice within the general curriculum Things child can learn given individualized instruction ALL Some Few

29 Curriculum vs. IEP Goals  Which are curriculum goals for the end of pre-k? 1.Demonstrate an understanding that the last number spoken represents the set. 2.Rote count to 10 3.Add two groups of concrete objects by counting the total 4.Use blocks/beads to extend patterns 5.Identify some known letters of the alphabet in words 6.Make some letter-sound combinations 7.Produce rhyming words 8.Copy some familiar words 9.Tell stories based on personal experiences

30 What kinds of Goals are Functional? Meaningful in the context of everyday living Integration of behaviors or skills Crucial for participation in daily routines ( increases independence and/or adaptability ) Needed across a variety of situations

31 Is It Functional? By May 20XX, when participating in a 20 minute or less large group, Paul will attend (sit on spot, look at teacher, respond when prompted) needing fewer than 2 verbal prompts for 3 out of 4 consecutive days. Meaningful in the context of everyday living Integration of behaviors or skills Crucial for participation in daily routines ( increases independence and/or adaptability ) Needed across a variety of situations

32 Is It Functional? By May 20XX, during small groups, Abby will imitate sounds and words with 80% accuracy. Meaningful in the context of everyday living Integration of behaviors or skills Crucial for participation in daily routines ( increases independence and/or adaptability ) Needed across a variety of situations

33 Is It Functional? By Sept. 20XX, when presented with tasks requiring comparison of groups of 1-5 objects, will identify how many objects are in each group without counting in 8/10 trials. Meaningful in the context of everyday living Integration of behaviors or skills Crucial for participation in daily routines ( increases independence and/or adaptability ) Needed across a variety of situations

34 Is It Functional? By May 20XX, when given a model, John will draw horizontal and vertical strokes in 8 out of 10 trials. Meaningful in the context of everyday living Integration of behaviors or skills Crucial for participation in daily routines ( increases independence and/or adaptability ) Needed across a variety of situations

35 Is It Functional? By May 20XX, when sitting in a chair with arms or other supports (pads and a footrest), Ellie will feed herself using a spoon for at least half of the meal on 3 out of 4 consecutive days. Meaningful in the context of everyday living Integration of behaviors or skills Crucial for participation in daily routines ( increases independence and/or adaptability ) Needed across a variety of situations

36 Is It Functional? By May 20XX, when given a set of items, Paul will match colors with 80% accuracy Meaningful in the context of everyday living Integration of behaviors or skills Crucial for participation in daily routines ( increases independence and/or adaptability ) Needed across a variety of situations

37 Is It Functional? By May 20XX, during a 5 minute play period, while playing games with an adult and one other child, Jordan will independently ask 2 or more questions using a picture communication system for 3 consecutive days. Meaningful in the context of everyday living Integration of behaviors or skills Crucial for participation in daily routines ( increases independence and/or adaptability ) Needed across a variety of situations

38 Is It Functional? By Sept. 20XX, after hearing a story read and having 5 target words defined, will use 2 or more of the target words to answer questions about the story on three consecutive days. Meaningful in the context of everyday living Integration of behaviors or skills Crucial for participation in daily routines ( increases independence and/or adaptability ) Needed across a variety of situations

39 Step 1: Determine the academic (preschool activities) and functional area(s) based on identified needs. Following directions Step 2: What routine(s) or activity(ies) does this affect? Outdoor activities Step 3: Draft the condition and behavior portion of the goal [routines or activities] during outdoor activities, Nathan will stop, wait, and stay with others by following directions for his safety Step 4: Draft the criterion portion of the goal and add the time frame By Dec. 20xx, …… 2 out of 3 opportunities across 3 consecutive days 39 Develop Functional IEP Goals Adapted from McWilliam, R.A. (2006)

40 40 Integrating the IEP meeting and ECO rating

41 Additional Potential Benefits of Integrating ECO and IEP Processes Streamlined, more efficient paperwork and use of staff time Less missing child and/or family outcomes data Improved authentic assessment practices: providers connect assessment and evaluation information to both processes Improved family understanding of their child’s functioning Improved family understanding of the purpose of EI/ECSE and their participation in services and supports Improved providers’ understanding of the meaningful connection between the child and family outcomes and the purpose of EI/ECSE NECTAC, 2012

42 PLAAFP Measurable Annual Goals Services

43 43 Info from IFSP/IEP process Determine Eligibility Develop Outcomes/ Goals Select Routines, Activities Settings Develop Strategies/Obj ectives Determine People and Resources (Services) Determine Frequency and Intensity Determine Criteria to Measure Progress Family hopes Family concerns priorities Family resources Child needs Child strengths Child interests Behaviors in Settings Desired activities Using Information from Functional Assessment within the IFSP/IEP Process

44 Integrated Outcomes-IEP Process

45 45 Goal Understand the connections among: Functional Assessment Developing meaningful IEP Goals Measuring the 3 global child outcomes

46 Measuring ECOs Functional IEP goals and services provided during participation in daily activities and routines allows for ongoing assessment of early childhood outcomes for – Progress monitoring – Making decisions about intervention practices – Rating outcomes at exit.

47 Why Use the Outcomes?? Socially validated – reflect what we are trying to achieve Functional They’re integrated – emphasize the whole child Flexible – not wedded to one particular assessment, curriculum, or level of child functioning Early Childhood Outcomes Center

48 Opportunities for Outcomes Measurement in IEP Process Part C to B Transition Meeting Curriculum Based Assessment Parent Input IEP Development/Eligibility Ongoing Intervention Annual IEP Review Transition/Exit Early Childhood Outcomes Center

49 Benefits of Integrating ECO with the IEP Process Provides better understanding of child’s functional skills and abilities across settings Provides a better understanding of child’s functional limitations and need for assistive technology Keeps team from automatically selecting next test item as intervention/goal Helps family know what is expected at that age and where child is functioning now Sharing responsibility for evaluation strengthens partnership with families Focuses conversation on functional—not isolated— skills and behaviors ECO Center, 2010

50 Early Steps to Integrating ECO with the IEP Process In the review of existing data, look for information related to the ECOs. IF the child is transitioning from a Part C Infant Toddler Program, organize the discussion of the child at the 90 day transition meeting in relation to the ECOs. During the evaluation, probe for information on caregiver concerns related to the ECOs. – Encourage families to describe their child’s typical day in the context of ECO areas, such as how he interacts with others, how he learns and solves problems, and how he gets his own needs met. Compare the child’s functional skills and behaviors with those expected for other children his age.

51 Early Steps to Integrating ECO with the IEP Process Include functional authentic assessment in the evaluation that will provide the team with information on all three ECO. – Consider the child’s functioning in the context of everyday activities and routines, in the three ECO areas. Document supporting evidence for ECO rating throughout the assessment and evaluation process During the IEP meeting, organize the discussion of the child in relation to the ECO; – Discuss how the child is functioning in the ECO areas and how the child’s skill’s and behaviors in the ECOS areas compare with other children the same age. In the PLAAFP, organize the description of strengths and need as they relate to the three outcome areas.

52 NEXT Steps in Integrating ECO with the IEP Process Share information about the 3 global outcomes and the ratings process with families during the evaluation and eligibility process. Use information from the DBRF, Child Outcomes Summary narrative, and language (not numbers) from the COSF ratings to describe PLAAFPs (this means COSF must be completed as part of the evaluation/eligibility/IEP process). Determine the ratings as part of the IEP process (initially and annually thereafter). Continue to update curriculum based assessment information quarterly, or as recommended by publisher, for ongoing progress monitoring.

53 Potential Challenges to Integrating ECO and IEP Processes IEP formats currently require domain specific PLAAFPs Some districts require goals linked to standards Philosophical views differ regarding strengths vs deficit based IEPs

54 Next Steps: Self Assessment Exploration Stage: Assessing Readiness Articulate desired changes Compare approaches Explore implementation Conduct public awareness Hexagon for Integrating Outcomes Exploration Tool m

55 Next Steps: Self Assessment Installation Stage: Planning for Implementation Secure Leadership Support Develop a communication plan Develop message & materials Build an implementation team Determine system supports Build training and technical assistance capacity Develop an implementation plan

56 Next Steps: Self Assessment Installation Stage: Planning for Implementation Integrating Child Outcomes Measurement with the Individualized Education Program (IEP) Process: Implementation Rating Scale Integrating Child Outcomes Measurement with the IEP Summary Worksheet ion.cfm#FlowChartsandActivities

57 ECO/IEP Integration Support KSDE TASN Tiffany Smith, KSDE Phoebe Rinkel, TASN-KITS Chelie Nelson, TASN-KITS

58 Messages From Our Sponsors Thank you for completing your evaluation!

59 References Bagnato, S.J., Neisworth, J.T., & Pretti-Frontczak, K. Linking Authentic Assessment and Early Childhood Intervention -Best Measures for Best Practices, Second Edition. Brookes Publishing, Baltimore, MD Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The Ecology of Human Development: Experiments by Nature and Design. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Jung, L. (2003). More is better: Maximizing natural learning opportunities. Young Exceptional Children, 6(3), Key Practices Underlying the IEP Process: Supporting Family Participation, Inclusive Practices and Positive Outcomes for Preschool Children with Disabilities, 2012 (Workgroup on Principles and Practices for the IEP Process). Retrieved from iepgoals/Key_Principles_IEP_Process.pdf iepgoals/Key_Principles_IEP_Process.pdf McWilliam, R.A. (2006). Steps to build a functional outcome. Retrieved from pdf pdf


Download ppt "Realizing Results: Integrating Early Childhood Outcomes (ECO) with the IEP 31 st Annual KDEC Conference February 28, 2013 Wichita, Kansas Presented by."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google