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Results-Oriented Transition Planning: Compliance Combined with Good Planning Practices Presented by Heidi Wyman, Dawn Breault, and Jen Cunha for NHRESPONDS.

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Presentation on theme: "Results-Oriented Transition Planning: Compliance Combined with Good Planning Practices Presented by Heidi Wyman, Dawn Breault, and Jen Cunha for NHRESPONDS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Results-Oriented Transition Planning: Compliance Combined with Good Planning Practices Presented by Heidi Wyman, Dawn Breault, and Jen Cunha for NHRESPONDS Dec. 13, 2011

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3 MEASURABLE POST SECONDARY GOALS Indicator 13 Question 1: Is there an appropriate measurable postsecondary goal (MPSG) or goals that covers education or training, employment and, as needed, independent living?

4 PSG are goals that are to be met after high school graduation, not while in high school. Must have a PSG in education/training and employment. PSG for independent living, if applicable. The IEP team should determine if an independent living PSG is needed based on the information in the student’s present level of performance and interests. 4 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

5 Post Secondary Goals ~ Compliance Compliance = 1 education/training PSG and 1 employment PSG for students who do not need an independent living PSG. Compliance = 1 education/training PSG and 1 employment PSG and 1 independent living PSG for students who need an independent living PSG. 5 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

6 Post Secondary Goals ~ Noncompliance Noncompliance = no PSGs at all. Noncompliance = PSGs are included, but are not measurable. Noncompliance = 1 PSG for education, but 0 for employment or vice versa. 6 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

7 7 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

8 PSG Compliance vs. Noncompliance In ComplianceNot in compliance After high school graduation, McKenzie will enroll in a two-year training program in the area of auto mechanics. McKenzie wants to study auto mechanics. After high school, McKenzie will work part time in an auto body garage. McKenzie is thinking about applying for a summer job. Upon completion of high school, Amy will receive on the job training in horticulture while working as a farm hand at a local farm. Amy likes plants and wants to learn more about that. Upon completion of high school, Amy will work full time as a farm hand at a local farm. Amy hopes to work at a farm. 8 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

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10 Common Concerns and Challenges Accountability Student has no idea what they want to do Student has a constant flow of ideas Student/family refuses to think or talk about it Parent/family has very different vision from student

11 Parent Feelings Shock Acceptance  Depression Hope  Denial Bargaining  Guilt Anger  Shame Panic  Isolation 

12 Activity Find a partner One person is student, one is case manager/teacher/transition coordinator Pick a student ‘story’ (preferably one that you know well enough to use as your “case study” today) Complete Student Input Questionnaire

13 UPDATING ANNUALLY Indicator 13 Question #2: Is (are) the postsecondary goals(s) updated annually?

14 Reviewers will not be reviewing previous IEPs. This question is contingent on Question 1 being in compliance. If question 1 is in compliance, then question 2 is also in compliance, based on the fact that the IEP being reviewed is current. If the IEP being reviewed is not the current IEP, then this question is also not in compliance. 14 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

15 AGE APPROPRIATE TRANSITION ASSESSMENT Indicator 13 Question #3: Is there evidence that the measurable post secondary goals were based on age appropriate transition assessment?

16 Reviewers expect to see the age appropriate transition assessment(s) to support the IEP transition plan in the student’s IEP folder. This assessment(s) should support the PSG, the transition service needs, etc. Assessments are ongoing and can be formal and/or informal. If the assessment doesn’t support the PSGs then it is not in compliance. 16 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

17 Transition assessment Part of an ongoing process Formal and informal Assessment data serve as the common thread in the transition process Forms the basis for defining goals and services to be included in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)” (The Division on Career Development and Transition (DCDT) of the Council for Exceptional Children defines p ).

18 Types of Transition Assessment informal behavioral assessment information aptitude tests interest and work values inventories intelligence tests achievement tests personality or preference tests career maturity or readiness tests self-determination assessments work-related temperament scales transition planning inventories

19 Great Resource: National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center’s Transition Assessment Guide /Tag.pdf

20 Life Skills Assessment Situational Assessment Functional Behavior Assessment Person Centered Planning Informational Interviewing Activities Career Maturity Rating Scale Adaptive Behavior Scales Work-Related Temperament Scales Futures Plan Careercruising.com Basic Informal Questionnaire Standardized Testing A three-tiered approach to transition assessments

21 Examples of Assessments from onsite visits Questionnaires completed by the student, or in conjunction with the student, regarding their personal interests, believed strengths, goals for after high school, etc. Career Cruising or other online similar versions Vocational Assessments Guidance office documentation from meetings with student IEP meeting notes from discussions with the student 21 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

22 Examples of Assessments from onsite visits Adaptive Behavior/ Daily Living Skills Assessment Interest Inventories Personality or preference tests Career Military or readiness tests Observation notes/student feedback from job shadows Intelligence/Achievement Tests 22 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

23 Activity What transition assessment info is available about this student? What information is needed? 23

24 Life Skills Assessment Situational Assessment Functional Behavior Assessment Person Centered Planning Informational Interviewing Activities Career Maturity Rating Scale Adaptive Behavior Scales Work-Related Temperament Scales Futures Plan Careercruising.com Basic Informal Questionnaire Standardized Testing A three-tiered approach to transition assessments

25 TRANSITION SERVICES Indicator 13 Question #4: Are there transition services in the IEP that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her postsecondary goal(s)?

26 Transition Service(s) must reasonably enable the student to meet his/her PSGs. Compliance = at least one transition service that addresses a transition need related to the PSGs. Noncompliance = no transition services listed in IEP or no transition service that will reasonably enable student to meet PSGs. 26 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

27  Should focus on academic and functional achievement to facilitate movement from school to post-school life  For each postsecondary goal, transition services can include:  Instruction  Related Services  Community Experience  Development of Employment and Post-School Objectives  Acquisition of Daily Living Skills  (if appropriate)  Functional Vocational Evaluation (if appropriate) 27 Transition Services

28  Coordination inside AND outside school  Team TO DO list  May require an extra meeting or two  Include creative thinkers who know the student  Agencies who are expected to pay MUST BE INVITED AND AGREE TO provide the service; DO NOT include services from an organization that has not agreed to provide them Address needs for Self-Advocacy and Self-Awareness training and Exploration Activities

29 Communicating with families about Transition Services Everyone has a role Think beyond agencies and systems Making connections

30 Activity Brainstorm the activities that could address functional and academic gaps Try not to get bogged down by specifics (how, who, etc.) at this stage

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34 Examples of Transition Services from onsite visits Self-Advocacy Skills Instruction Personal banking instruction Work related social skills instruction Resume writing, online job application writing, etc instruction Voter registration instruction ELO, internship or job shadowing experience related to their PSG(s) Travel instruction (using the bus schedule during class instruction) 34 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

35 Examples of Transition Services cont. Food preparation and kitchen hygiene instruction Instruction in telling and calculating time Contacting disability services/resource centers on college campuses/training centers, etc. Any service(s) that will teach the student how to support themselves once they are in the real world (after graduation) without the support of the high school that will reasonably enable the student to reach their PSGs. 35 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

36 COURSE OF STUDY Indicator 13 Question 5: Do transition services include courses of study that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her postsecondary goal(s)?

37 Courses of study must be listed for all years in the current IEP. Courses of study must support PSGs. Just having courses listed does not equal compliance. To be in compliance, the courses of study must reasonably enable the student to meet his/her PSGs listed in the IEP. 37 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

38 Course of Study  NH Rules require that this is in the IEP at AGE 14 and that a “vocational component” is included when vocational education is an anticipated pathway  Consider ELOs, Work-based learning and alternative learning plans  Another reason to plan ahead: activities outside the school must comply with Department of Labor School to Work rules

39 Communicating with families about the Course of Study Families do not know what is required for graduation How does this translate for my child? Diploma options – Staying past age 18 Course of Study vs. Schedule

40 ANNUAL GOALS Indicator 13 Question 6: Is (are ) there annual IEP goals related to the student’s transition services needs?

41 You must have at least one annual goal that is related to a transition service need listed in the IEP. The annual goal does not have to be titled “transition” but it must clearly relate back to the transition service need. 41 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

42 Annual IEP Goal Questions  What skills and knowledge must the student attain this academic year that are necessary for achieving the identified post-secondary goals?  What skills and knowledge does the student currently have that support their post-secondary goals?

43 Activity Look at the transition services you came up with for your student Is there at least one service that requires the student to increase skill or knowledge? What might an annual goal measure and how?

44 STUDENT INVITATION Indicator 13 Question 7: Is there evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team mtg?

45 Invitation or Meeting notice must be clearly addressed and delivered to the student Can be hand delivered, snail-mailed, etc. Documentation that this took place must be included in the student’s IEP folder. A copy of the invite/meeting notice is sufficient for meeting this requirement. 45 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

46 CONSENT FOR AGENCY INVITATION Indicator 13 Question 8: If appropriate, is there evidence that a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority?

47 If an outside agency is listed as responsible for a transition service in the IEP for the current year, the reviewers will expect to find proof that parental or adult student consent was given to invite the outside agency to the IEP meeting. If the outside agency was invited by the parent, then there is no need for proof of consent in the IEP folder. 47 NHDOE, BUREAU OF SPECIAL EDUCATION NOVEMBER 18, 2011

48 THANK YOU! Homework if you are registered for session #2: Review one student’s IEP using the I13 Checklist. – Is the IEP in compliance? – What are the primary issues with compliance? – Did the student engage in IEP development? Did they actively participate in their IEP meeting? Why or why not?


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