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IEP Development & Implementation Road Map to Improved Outcomes for Students with ASD.

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Presentation on theme: "IEP Development & Implementation Road Map to Improved Outcomes for Students with ASD."— Presentation transcript:

1 IEP Development & Implementation Road Map to Improved Outcomes for Students with ASD

2 INTRODUCTIONS

3 Improving the Journey Wait for Team Time to Talk –Write / share notes Cell Phones on Silent CONTRIBUTE –Everyone has a contribution to make

4 Your Learning Accountability NOVICE INTERMEDIATE ADVANCED

5 History Lesson: IEP Module Purpose of Tools (POC) Implementation in the follow up year Errors in the IEP Process

6 PLAAFP Goals and Objectives not related to ASD Laundry list of SAS Standard Time for Service Placement decisions predetermined –Lack of LRE in the Process

7 Purpose of this Module NOT Compliance Training in IEP Development “Results will no longer take a back seat to compliance.” Eleanor White, Michigan State Director of Special Education

8 Purpose of this Module IS NOT –Compliance training in IEP development –Cover ALL aspects of IEP development –Address issues related to ALL disabilities –An IEP; Considered Pre-IEP Planning IS –Focus on PROCESS not FORMS –Consider LRE throughout the process –Address the unique needs of students with ASD –Improve IEP Implementation “IEP Implementation CONTINUES to be the most frequent state (MDE) complaint…” 2012 OSE Update

9 Materials for this Road Trip 3 years of IEPs for target student (current IEP and 2 years previous) Progress Reports, Grades, etc. Most recent MET report Most recent REED (Review of Existing Evaluation Data) Curriculum for target student’s grade level: –K-8 GLCEs ( ) –High School Curriculum ( ) District / ISD data report for SPP #5: Education Environments: https://www.mischooldata.org/https://www.mischooldata.org/

10 AGENDA Understanding Special Education –History of Special Education –Vocabulary Lesson –Purpose of the IEP –Ed Benefit Review Developing the IEP –The PLAAFP –Supplementary Aids / Services / Personnel Supports –Goals and Objectives –S. E. Programs/Services and Ancillary/Related Services IEP Implementation –Implementation Fidelity –Measuring Progress

11 FAPE LRE IDEA Navigating the Acronyms REED ASD FBA BIP MET

12 COMMON LANGUAGE ACTIVITY Define / Describe FAPE Define / Describe LRE What is the purpose of an IEP? Describe Special Education

13 OUR DECISIONS HAVE TO ALIGN WITH: THE LAW THE RESEARCH THE DATA

14 WARNING I heard that…. I was told…. PRACTICE IS NOT NECESSARILY LAW, POLICY, or RULE

15 History of Education Horace Mann: –Father of American Education Common Schools / Teach Common Values –EQUALITY Compulsory Education –Tax $$$

16 SPECIAL EDUCATION HISTORY 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education –Schools inherently unequal –“…… human tendencies to prejudge, discriminate against, and stereotype other people by their ethnic, religious, physical, or cultural characteristics…..”

17 Impact of the Brown Decision Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (underprivileged students) PARC and MILLS: Exclusion of students with disabilities Congressional Investigation 1972 of education of children with disabilities –Millions not served 1975: Congress enacted P.L –Children with disabilities have a RIGHT to education –Ensure ACCESS to education Wright & Wright, 2009

18 IDEA Regulations Two fundamental requirements: –That the child will receive FAPE –In the least restrictive environment (LRE).

19 FAPE: What Does the “Appropriate” Mean? Rowley v. Hendrick Hudson Dist. (USSC 1982) 1. The state has "complied with the procedures set forth in the Act." (ex. procedural safeguards / legal requirements, etc.) 2. The IEP is “reasonably calculated to enable the child to receive educational benefits.” ---more than negligible / minimal, but does not require maximizing potential---

20 What is FAPE? IDEA 2004 An educational program that is individualized to a specific child, designed to meet that child's unique needs, provides access to the general curriculum, meets the grade-level standards established by the state, and from which the child receives educational benefit. 20 U.S.C. §1401(9). Ed Benefit = progress over time ( IEP goals, curriculum, social, communication, behavior, etc.) To provide FAPE, schools must provide students with an education that prepares the child for further education, employment, and independent living. 20 U.S.C. §1400(c)(5)(A)(i)

21 2008 Easter Seals Study: –More than 80% of adults with ASD ages live at home with their parents –Compared to approximately 50-59% of typical youth ages (2011 data) (http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/families_households/cb html)http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/families_households/cb html Adults with Autism –With parents or guardian 81% –Independently, with spouse or partner 3% –With other family member/spouse/partner 0% –Supported residence for ppl with special needs 14% –Other 2% Adults with Asperger –With parents or guardian 71% –Independently, with spouse or partner 9% –With other family member/spouse/partner 5% –Supported residence for ppl with special needs 7% –Other 7% National Outcome Data: Housing Easter Seals, 2008

22 National OUTCOME DATA: Employment A University of Wisconsin-Madison 2002 study of 405 adolescents and adults with ASD found that only 10% were in competitive employment. Barnard, et.al –As few as 6% of individuals with ASD have fulltime employment –12% of individuals with Asperger Syndrome are employed despite having average or high than average IQs 2008 Easter Seals Study (Living with Autism): About 6 in 10 children with ASD aged 16 or older have not looked for work, yet 75% of typical children are already working. Even compared to individuals with other disabilities, the employment outcomes for individuals with ASD is significantly lower.

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27 What predicts post-school employment? Students who had the highest degree of integration with age-appropriate peers were more likely to engage in post-school employment IQ, behavior problems, physical disability, and individual demographics did not correlate with integrated employment outcome White, J. & Weiner, J.S. (2004). Influence of least restrictive environment and community based training on integrated employment outcomes for transitioning students with severe disabilities. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 21, 149– 156.

28 Predictors / OutcomesEducationEmploymentIndep. Living Career Awareness P (Potential)P Community Experience P Exit Exam Requirements / High School Diploma Status P Inclusion in General Education M (Moderate)MM Interagency Collaboration PP Occupational Courses PP Paid Employment / Work Experience MMP Parental Involvement P Program of Study P Self Advocacy / Self Determination PP Self Care / Independent Living PPM Social Skills PP Student Support PPP Transition Program MP Vocational Education MM Work Study M

29 FAPE in SUMMARY Compliance with the procedures Individualized Meet that child's unique needs (disability area) Access to the general curriculum (grade-level standards) Educational benefit (progress in education / goals and objectives) Prepares the child for further education, employment, and independent living (socialization skill development / independent skills)

30 IDEA Regulations Two fundamental requirements: –That the child will receive FAPE –In the least restrictive environment (LRE).

31 Defining LRE: Fed Language “To the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities…. are educated in the general education classroom with children who are not disabled…” ….and that special classes, separate schooling, or other removal of children with disabilities from regular education environment occurs only if the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aides and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily.”

32 Two Primary Reasons Students with ASD are Excluded from General Education Settings

33 What is SPECIAL EDUCATION? --not a place --set of supports and services To ensure ACCESS & PROGRESS Where the child RECEIVES special education services is the placement…. The first “where” to consider is…

34 Purpose of the IEP Define Special Education necessary to assure FAPE in the LRE: Access to, participation and progress in…. General Education Curriculum

35 OUR DECISIONS HAVE TO ALIGN WITH: THE LAW THE RESEARCH THE DATA

36 Excerpts of the Outcome Data “The achievement level of students with disabilities does not decrease in general education classrooms.” –Villa, Thousand, Meyers, & Nevin. (1996). Teacher and administrator perceptions of heterogeneous education. Exceptional Children, 63, “Placement in a special education class resulted in lower achievement for students who have lower cognitive ability.” –Kavale & Forness, (1999). Efficacy of special education and related services. Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Retardation.

37 Excerpts of the Outcome Data Cited from: Eason, A.I. and Whitbread, K. (2006) IEP and Inclusion Tips for Parents and Teachers. IEP Resources “Students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms show academic gains in a number of areas, including improved performance on standardized tests, mastery of IEP goals, grades, on-task behavior, and motivation to learn.” (National Center for Education Restructuring and Inclusion, 1995) “Moreover, placement in inclusive classrooms does not interfere with the academic performance of students without disabilities with respect to the amount of allocated time and engaged instructional time, the rate of interruption to planned activities and student achievement on test scores and report card grades.” (York, Vandercook, MacDonald, Heise-Neff and Caughey, 1992)

38 Excerpts of the Outcome Data Cited from: Eason, A.I. and Whitbread, K. (2006) IEP and Inclusion Tips for Parents and Teachers. IEP Resources “Although separate classes, with lower student to teacher ratios, controlled environments, and specially trained staff would seem to offer benefits to a child with a disability, research fails to demonstrate the effectiveness of such programs.” (Lipsky, 1997; Sailor, 2003)

39 Excerpts of the Outcome Data Cited from: Eason, A.I. and Whitbread, K. (2006) IEP and Inclusion Tips for Parents and Teachers. IEP Resources “There is mounting evidence that, other than a smaller class size, “there is little that is special about the special education system,” and that the negative effects of separating children with disabilities from their peers far outweigh any benefit to smaller classes.” (Audette & Algozzine, 1997)

40 CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS “…the implementation of this chapter (33 : IDEA) has been impeded by low expectations, and an insufficient focus on applying replicable research on proven methods of teaching and learning for children with disabilities.” Understanding Federal Law U.S. Code (U.S.C.) 50 Titles Title 20: Education 78 Chapters Chapter 33: IDEA — IV Subchapters Subchapter I: General Provisions 82 Sections -- denoted as § § 1400: Findings / Purpose

41 “Almost 30 years of research and experience has demonstrated that the education of children with disabilities can be made more effective by— –having high expectations for such children and ensuring their access to the general education curriculum in the regular classroom, to the maximum extent possible, in order to— (i) meet developmental goals and, to the maximum extent possible, the challenging expectations that have been established for all children; and (ii) be prepared to lead productive and independent adult lives, to the maximum extent possible; “ CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS

42 GETTING BACK TO THE INTENTION OF THE LAW One Curriculum: –General Education WITH Special Education Support (instead of vs.) NCLB (2002) IDEA Revisions (2004) –Increased Accountability –Improved Outcomes –Research Based Instruction 80/80 Statement OSEP

43 More >> << Less General Education Classroom 80%+ Target 63% MI CIMS Thresholds for Restriction SPP Indicator 5: Educational Environments Targets Continuum of Services Restrictive General Education Classroom 40-79% Target 20.3% General Education Classroom <40% Target 11.9% Separate Facility Target 4.8%

44 District Data Report

45 YOUR DATA

46 Why do we continue to perpetuate a segregated culture? DISCUSSION

47 Incremental Steps YOUR ACCOUNTABILITY Your Behavior Expresses Your Belief System

48 Send a folder of “alternative” work with the student to the general education class? –Have “token” LRE time? –Attend specials only? Have all the special education students eat at one lunch table? –Have a different recess? Use of activities that are inappropriate for the age of the student (ex. Calendar / Clifford). Your Behavior Expresses your Belief System… DO YOU……

49 Your Behavior Expresses your Belief System. DO YOU... Talk about students with ASD in front of them? Use disability-first language? –Use “high functioning” and “low functioning” to describe students? –Talk about students based on their eligibility category rather than their name? (The Autistics) Blame the STUDENT? –Not motivated; Not ready; Unemployable; OTHERS? Adopt a “protective” attitude? –DIGNITY OF RISK!! Talk about the student’s lack of perceived competency rather than their contributions? –LEAST DANGEROUS ASSUMPTION

50 Self Evaluation... Beliefs and Behaviors that PREVENT Integrated Opportunities

51 The point is this…….. THERE ARE BARRIERS TO SUCCESSFULLY EDUCATING STUDENTS WITH ASD….. WE SHOULD NOT BE ONE OF THOSE BARRIERS….. LOU BROWN

52 You did what you did when you knew what you knew….. You now know different – which makes you accountable!!

53 Self Evaluation... Your accountability to the change process Beliefs and Behaviors that SUPPORT Integrated Opportunities

54 Making Change Happen If you write it down, you are more likely to do it…. AND…. If you TELL someone else, you are even MORE likely to do it…. AND…. If you post it, you are that much MORE likely to do it! ! CHANGE

55 NOW WHAT? Personal Accountability (incremental steps) to promote and integrated culture…. Personal Accountability to the IEP, the IEP Process, and IEP Implementation: –Understand our challenges and errors----

56 Educational Benefit Review PROCESS Was the IEP reasonably calculated to ensure Educational Benefit? What IS Educational Benefit? –Rowley (Supreme Court 1982)-- more than minimal progress –Rowley in 2007 (align with IDEA 2004 / NCLB) PLAAFP related to involvement / progress in general curriculum MEASURABLE annual goals Services planned to support PROGRESS toward goals In the LRE (gen ed curriculum / environment) IEP adjusted if no progress made

57 Materials Needed THREE years of: –IEPs –METs / other assessments –REED (Review of Existing Evaluation Data) –Progress Reports on IEP goals

58 Step 1: Complete ONE for Each Year What are the needs listed in the PLAAFP? What supplementary aids and services are listed / described? What are the goals and objectives? Describe the programs and services listed. What evidence of progress is available? Did the student make adequate progress?

59 Step 2: Analyze the Relationship Among Components Do the needs listed in the PLAAFP appear to be the PRIMARY ones related to access to, participation in, and progress in the general education CURRICULUM and ENVIRONMENTS compared to peers? Where is each need addressed in the IEP? Does EACH supplementary aid and service address a need(s) specifically listed in the PLAAFP? Are Universal Supports for students with ASD considered / addressed? Are the goals and objectives/ benchmarks measurable? Does each goal specifically address a need(s) listed in the PLAAFP? For each goal and objective/ benchmark, is there a program or service to address it? Are the programs and services designed to ensure progress on the goals and objectives? Did the IEP consider LRE in the development of the programs / services? Is there objective data to support progress on the goals and objectives? Did the student make adequate progress? If not, was the IEP re-designed to address that?

60 Identify the HOLES

61 Step 3: Analyze Relationships ACROSS Years YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 What SHOULD you Find?

62 By End of Today 3 Years of IEPs analyzed by year 3 Years analyzed across the years Questions considered / answered Holes identified

63 REPORT OUT Do the needs listed in the PLAAFP appear to be the PRIMARY ones related to access to, participation in, and progress in the general education CURRICULUM and ENVIRONMENTS related to peers? Where is each need addressed in the IEP? Does EACH supplementary aid and service address a need(s) specifically listed in the PLAAFP? Are Universal Supports for students with ASD considered / addressed? Are the goals and objectives/ benchmarks measurable? Does each goal specifically address a need(s) listed in the PLAAFP? For each goal and objective/ benchmark, is there a program or service to address it? Are the programs and services designed to ensure progress on the goals and objectives? Did the IEP consider LRE in the development of the programs / services? Is there objective data to support progress on the goals and objectives? Did the student make adequate progress? If not, was the IEP re- designed to address that?

64 An IEP Process that….. Focuses on PROCESS not FORMS Considers LRE throughout the process Addresses the unique needs of students with ASD Improves IEP Implementation

65 Using Meeting Mechanics Visual Support (white / chart board) Facilitator Note-Taker (IEP Form / Computer) Process (Logical IEP Progression) Brainstorming Principles –Democratic –All ideas are considered / recognized –Professional Role Elimination –OTHERS (FRONTLOAD) Decision-Making Rules –No opinion unless informed by: Law; Research; Data

66 Fatal Comments during the IEP “We can’t do that!” “We don’t…” “That would cost too much.” “No student receives more than ____ minutes of service per week.” “We don’t have staff to….” “I’m only in the building one day a week” Thrun Law Firm, P.C. & Scholten Fant, 2007

67 Fatal Communication Error Lack of succinct, clear responses: Comes across like dodging answers: –“Well, it depends…” –“Well, it might, could, should, etc….” –“It varies…” –“Well, I’ve only seen him 3x…”

68 Sentence Starters….. “The data suggests….” “We have evidence that shows….” “Our observations have shown…” “The law indicates….” “The research supports….”

69 IEP Guiding Principles: Avoid Human Nature Traps!! All opinions informed by the law, research, & data. We cannot change the past; We can change today to establish a different future. Communication requires interpretation: What is said may not be what was meant. Presume Competence (Least Dangerous Assumption) Dignity of Risk

70 What to BRING to the IEP DATA: Not PLAAFP already written –Assessment Information –Observational Data –Background Knowledge Considerations for Supplementary Aids and Services Goals and Objectives / Benchmarks IDEAS NOT: “My PLAFFP” / “My GOALS”

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73 The PLAAFP IEP Process for Students with ASD (Cheat Sheet)

74 Statement of the student’s Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (and transition related needs). The PLAAFP Question you are attempting to answer: How does the student’s DISABILITY impact access to and participation in & progress in: The general education CURRICULUM General education ENVIRONMENTS (including social skill development, independent skills, etc.)? Further education, employment, and independent living

75 What about “ ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT?” ED did not define “academic achievement” 2006 IDEA Regulations: –“’Academic achievement’ generally refers to a child’s performance in academic areas (e.g. reading, math, science..). We believe the definition could vary depending on a child’s circumstance or situation, and therefore, we do not believe a definition of ‘academic achievement’ should be included in these regulations.” ASD Eligibility Requirements….

76 AREAS of the student’s DISABILITY that impact access to and participation & progress in: The general education CURRICULUM General education ENVIRONMENTS (including social skill development, independent skills, etc.)? Ability to Participate in Instruction Socialization Skills / Competence Communication Independent Skills Transition Issues Ability to Manage Stress / Anxiety Behaviors PLAAFP Statement Framework Janzen, J., 2003

77 Prioritizing Areas “PLPs should be pruned to reflect the educational priorities for the period covered by the IEP…...” “Without prioritizing, there is a ‘Jack of all trades, master of none’ effect, whereby too much is attempted and too little is accomplished.” Diane Twachtman-Cullen & Jennifer Twachtman-Reilly (2002) IEP goals / objectives are not the ONLY thing you are teaching!!

78 AREAS of the student’s DISABILITY that impact access to and participation in & progress in: The general education CURRICULUM General education ENVIRONMENTS (including social skill development, independent skills, etc.)? Ability to Participate in Instruction Socialization Skills / Competence Communication Independent Skills Transition Issues Ability to Manage Stress / Anxiety Behaviors DATA for each area— COMPARED TO SAME AGE PEERS PLAAFP Statement Framework

79 OPTIONS for DATA Standardized Measures Rating Scales State / Local Assessments Behavior Plans / Logs Classroom Output Grades / Progress on Current IEP Goals Direct Observation GLCEs MDE Quick Reference Guide: Section 2 PLAAFP

80 AREAS of the student’s DISABILITY that impact access to and participation & progress in: The general education CURRICULUM General education ENVIRONMENTS (including social skill development, independent skills, etc.)? Ability to Participate in Instruction Socialization Skills / Competence Communication Independent Skills Transition Issues Ability to Manage Stress / Anxiety Behaviors Data for EACH area— COMPARED TO PEERS How do these needs IMPACT access to, involvement & participation in, success in general education CURRICULUM and ENVIRONMENTS? PLAAFP Statement Framework

81 AreaDataIMPACT Social Sean has 97% fewer social interactions than others students the same age based on staff observations. He talks about Star Wars excessively which results in peers resisting interaction with him. He does not have a preferred friend, and at lunch and recess, he plays alone. According to the “developmental inventory”, typical peers can identify a preferred friend and interact with others during play activities. In the classroom, Sean does not choose a partner or join a work group without adult prompting. He does not participate in cooperative work with peers without argument, which results in adult intervention and 3-4 times per week, Sean having to leave the classroom due to disruption. Social interactions are impacted by continual Star Wars talk. PLAAFP Statement Guided Practice

82 AreaDataIMPACT Independent Skills Sean does not independently navigate the daily schedule. He require 6-7 verbal and visual prompts by adults before following simple tasks. He does not independently get materials he needs to complete classroom activities and tasks, and requires constant adult prompts to complete classroom work. Based on classroom observations, typical peers navigate the environment independently and complete their assignments with minimal adult prompting / support. Because Sean requires intensive adult prompting to follow the daily routine, prepare for classroom activities, and complete classroom work, he misses instruction as much as 40 minutes per hour. As such, he is pulled out of the classroom to “catch up” on his work as much as an hour a day at which time he is missing the other instruction in the classroom. PLAAFP Statement Guided Practice

83 AreaDataIMPACT Behavior Johnny has a low frustration tolerance especially with paper / pencil academic tasks. When this occurs, which ranges from 3-5 times per day, he whines and will not continue his work. When extremely frustrated which occurs 2-3 times weekly, he utters swear words loud enough for peers to hear him. Based on “developmental inventory”, ‘peers his age persist when frustrated and can identify and use 2-3 strategies for reducing frustration. Based on teacher report and classroom observations, when frustrated, Johnny misses as much as minutes per incident of engaged time attempting to deal with his frustration. Additionally, he does not utilize strategies for reducing his frustration so he is not able to persist in academic tasks which further impacts his progress. PLAAFP Statement EXAMPLE

84 Translating Process to Paper MDE Model IEP Form Section 2 B: –ONE of 3 Options Required Option I: Identification of need across a number of specified areas Option II: Narrative Approach Option III: Designed for use with progress monitoring systems

85 Translating Process to Paper MDE Model IEP Form: Section 2

86 TEAM TIME PLAAFP Statement for Target Student AreaDataIMPACT Socialization Independent Skills ONE MORE OF YOUR CHOICE List what data you have for each area compared to peers / action plan for what data is needed What impact does this have on access to, participation / involvement in and success / progress in gen ed CURRICULUM / ENVIRONMENTS Considerations: Meeting Mechanics / Sentence Starters

87 REPORT OUT

88 Just because there is a NEED does not mean you need a GOAL— However, you MUST address each need identified in the PLAAFP in another appropriate section of the IEP…. –Secondary Transition Considerations –Supplementary Aids and Services –Goals and Objectives / Benchmarks

89 Supplementary Aids and Services

90 What ARE Supplementary Aids / Services? § Supplementary aids and services means aids, services, and other supports that are provided in regular education classes, other education-related settings, and in extracurricular and nonacademic settings, to enable children with disabilities to be educated with nondisabled children to the maximum extent appropriate in accordance with §§ through (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(33))

91 MDE Interpretation of the Purpose of Supplementary Aids and Services Provided to enable the student to: –Advance appropriately toward attaining the annual IEP goals. –Be involved and progress in the general education curriculum and to participate in extra-curricular and other nonacademic activities. –Be educated and participate in activities with other students with disabilities and nondisabled students. MDE OSE-EIS Quick Reference Guide: Section 5

92 Supplementary Aids / Services Universal Supports (the Non-Negotiables) Visual / Organizational Supports Functional Communication System Accommodations / Differentation Peer to Peer Support Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports Appropriate Adult Support

93 Translating PROCESS to PAPER Documenting Intensive Individualized Plans VARIABLES: –Nature of the support varies significantly (day to day, content to content, etc.) –Support is intensive in nature –Support includes a lot of details

94 Translating Process to Paper MDE Model IEP Form: Section 5 Positive Behavior Support PLAN Individualized Accommodation PLAN Individualized Differentiated Instruction PLAN Grading Matrix; ExampleGrading MatrixExample Individualized Peer to Peer Support PLAN OTHERS?

95 Translating Process to Paper MDE Model IEP Form: Section 5

96 TEAM TIME Supplementary Aids and Services Worksheet for Target Student

97 Developing GOALS and Objectives / Benchmarks

98 Measurable annual goals must be designed to… Annual Goals Meet child’s needs that result from child’s disability Not --Restatement of gen ed curriculum --List of everything the student is expected to learn in every content area to enable the child to be involved in and make progress in the general education curriculum

99 What skills does the student need in order to access / master the content rather than what content the student needs to learn. DISCUSSION

100 What about IEP’s written for / aligned with the Content Standards? WHY SB-IEP? –MDE Focus on Results June 09 Excluded from gen ed curriculum; Exposed to an alternate curriculum w/ deficit driven instruction (remediation); Not included in district / statewide assessments –MDE Quick Reference Guide 6530_6598_ ,00.htmlhttp://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615, _6598_ ,00.html

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102 What about academic goals? No hard / fast rules Things to consider: –Definition of “academic” –3 tiered system of academic support –Have to know ASD—OUTPUT –Gain Rate vs. Time Spent

103 Targeting Goal AREAS 1.Needs that CANNOT be met through supplementary aids and services (or secondary transition)… AND / OR 2. Needs and/or Supports from Supplementary Aids and Services that require “specialized instruction”

104 “Specially Designed Instruction” IDEA Words and Terms to Know (March 2009) Adapting the content, methodology, or the delivery of instruction to address the unique needs that result from the child's disability…. to ensure that the child has access to the general curriculum…..

105 Supplementary Aids / Services Universal Supports (the Non-Negotiables) Visual / Organizational Supports Functional Communication System Accommodations / Differentation Peer to Peer Support Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports Appropriate Adult Support

106 Writing MEASURABLE Goals and Objectives / Benchmarks

107 Writing MEASURABLE IEP Goals and Objectives / Benchmarks (PROGRESS MARKERS) 1.Write an annual measurable goal with a number of separate but relevant measurable objectives. -- Progress on the objectives would lead to meeting the annual goal. 2.Write an annual measurable goal with a number of timed, measurable benchmarks. --GAS: Goal Attainment Scaling

108 Writing Goals (Objectives / Benchmarks) UTILIZING….Student Will…. Under what conditions? At what level / degree (criteria)? The IEP Form: ADD: by what date; on what assessment? Does not have line for: Utilizing

109 Writing Measurable Goals Formula for Success UTILIZING— Using WHAT tool, support, system, etc. will the student learn to perform the skill? Utilizing a visual schedule Using peers / peer to peer support Using a picture choice board When provided a visual prompt Using a visual functional communication system Utilizing a routine checklist When given a check schedule card Using a choice modification strategy Using a self-management checklist

110 UTILIZING—Using WHAT tool, support, system, etc. will the student learn to perform the skill? Behavior— Get some VERBS in your sentence –What competency / skill should change? –OBSERVABLE Writing Measurable Goals Formula for Success

111 BEHAVIOR Independently transition from activity to activity Make a choice Complete the activity independently Follow the classroom routine Complete the worksheet independently Raise hand and wait to be called on Ask for help Initiate interaction with a peer Follow instructions independently Make and engage in a choice Remain in seat / area Answer content-related questions Request a food item Independently put on / take off

112 UTILIZING—Using WHAT tool, support, system, etc. will the student learn to perform the skill? Behavior— Get some VERBS in your sentence –What competency / skill should change? –OBSERVABLE Conditions / Criteria— Under what conditions and how MUCH / WELL will be considered mastery for the time frame of the IEP (use peers)? Writing Measurable Goals Formula for Success

113 Condition-- Under what condition should the skill be demonstrated (e.g. time, place, event)? During transition times During a social conversation During class discussions At lunch time (or math, science, etc.) During morning and lunch recess During independent work activities When teacher is giving group instructions During morning arrival routines When preparing to go home

114 CRITERIA / Mastery 9 out of 10 trials / opportunities 6 items / assignments 75% accuracy Increase by 10% 3 times a day On 9 consecutive attempts For 15 minutes at a time Within 5 minutes 4 times weekly 3 out of 5 days 4 class periods

115 GOALS & OBJECTIVES / BENCHMARKS Guided Practice Chris will raise his hand when he needs assistance or wants to share important information. (90% of time) Chris will ask for help and accept teacher response when he doesn’t understand something. (80% of time) With gestural prompts from peers and adults, Chris will limit conversational ideas appropriate to the setting. (90% of time)

116 GOALS & OBJECTIVES / BENCHMARKS Guided Practice Kayla will use appropriate social greetings upon entering and leaving the classroom with teacher and peers (hi, bye) in 8 out of 10 trial days. Kayla will expressively identify peers and adults by name in group and play activities with verbal prompting. (4/5 trials) Kayla will gain the attention of a communicative partner by verbal or nonverbal means to make a request, to gain assistance, and to engage in activities. (4/5 trials)

117 GOALS & OBJECTIVES / BENCHMARKS Guided Practice During lunch and snack, Marci will use a visual system (words / pictures) to request at least 10 food items 8 of 10 trials. Marci will use a picture schedule to follow daily classroom routines with no more than 2 prompts 8 of 10 daily transitions. Using a visual list of needed materials for classroom activities, Marci will independently gather 8 of 10 items.

118 Using the GAS to Establish Benchmarks Goal Attainment Scaling +2 Much more than expected +1 More than expected 0 EXPECTED OUTCOME -1 Less than expected -2 Much less than expected (BASELINE)

119 Next, Identify the Goal FIRST, Identify Baseline

120 Changing Prompt Levels  Physical prompt (-2)  Gestural prompt (-1)  Verbal prompt (0)  Visual prompt (+1)  Independent (+2) Changing Setting  One setting in school (-1)  Two settings in school (0)  2 school settings plus 1 community setting (+2) Changing People  No adults (-2)  Familiar adult (-1)  Unfamiliar adult (0)  With one peer (+1)  Across multiple peers (+2)

121 GAS Example: It’s better to increase independence with lower skill levels than to increase skill levels at lower independence levels. Level of Attainment Goal : Independently follow a visual schedule 5 of 10 days Much less than expected -2 Given a visual “check schedule” card and the verbal instruction “check your schedule,” with 5-8 verbal / physical prompts, Ss will select each activity from the visual schedule and transition to the appropriate area for that activity on 5 of 10 days. Somewhat less than expected Given a visual “check schedule” card and the verbal instruction “check your schedule,” with no more than 3 verbal / physical prompts, Ss will select each activity from the visual schedule and transition to the appropriate area for that activity on 5 of 10 days. Expected level of outcome 0 Given a visual “check schedule” card and the verbal instruction “check your schedule,” with no more than 1 verbal prompts, Ss will select each activity from the visual schedule and transition to the appropriate area for that activity on 5 of 10 days. Somewhat more than expected +1 Given a visual “check schedule” card and the verbal instruction “check your schedule,” Ss will independently select each activity from the visual schedule and transition to the appropriate area for that activity on 5 of 10 days. Much more than expected +2 Given a visual “check schedule” card and the verbal instruction “check your schedule,” Ss will independently select each activity from the visual schedule and transition to the appropriate area for that activity on 8 of 10 days.

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125 Translating Process to Paper MDE Model IEP Form Section 4: Goals and Objectives / Benchmarks –ONE of 2 Options Option I: Uses a narrative approach Option II: Uses a progress monitoring approach

126 Translating Process to Paper MDE Model IEP Form: Section 4

127 TEAM TIME Writing Measurable IEP Goals and Objectives / Benchmarks for Target Student

128 Identifying Special Education Programs and Related Services

129 If you have a goal, you MUST have a program / service to address it….. What service? What program? WHERE (Placement)?

130 Making Placement Decisions "In all cases, placement decisions must be individually determined on the basis of each child’s abilities and needs and each child’s IEP, and not solely on factors such as category of disability, severity of disability, availability of special education and related services, configuration of the service delivery system, availability of space, or administrative convenience.“ Preface, 2006 Final Federal Regulations for the IDEA

131 The LRE Question With supplementary aids / services AND / OR Push in ancillary / itinerant / related services can the student make adequate progress on the IEP goals and objectives? If yes, no pull out program / services is needed…. NO RESTRICTION – GEN ED PLACEMENT…. If no, what level of restriction is needed and for what program / related services in order to assure adequate progress on the IEP goals and objective / benchmarks AND more than minimal progress in the general education curriculum.

132

133 TEAM TIME Discussion on Special Education Programs / Services for Target Student

134 Implementing the IEP with Fidelity

135 Implementing the IEP Selecting EBP Fidelity Tools Measuring Progress (PROBES)

136 Selecting EBPs: Considerations Goals Area / Skill to Increase Characteristics of the Student –Student Interests Variables of the Environment Family Preferences

137

138 Resources for EBPs in ASD NPDC: OCALI Autism Internet Modules: National Standards Project: Association for Science in ASD Treatment

139 Implementing the IEP Selecting EBP Fidelity Tools Measuring Progress (PROBES)

140

141 Implementing the IEP Selecting EBP Fidelity Tools Measuring Progress (PROBES)

142 Measuring Progress PROBES—Things to Consider –Who –When –How Often –In What Format –Analysis –Reporting

143 Who’s RESPONSIBLE for Progress?

144 SUMMARY QUESTIONS / CLARIFICATIONS 5 CONCEPTS to IMPLEMENT


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