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Day 2 Special Education PACTA PIL Special Education Service Delivery, IEP Implementation and Student Achievement Brenda Kauffman, Special Education Consultant.

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Presentation on theme: "Day 2 Special Education PACTA PIL Special Education Service Delivery, IEP Implementation and Student Achievement Brenda Kauffman, Special Education Consultant."— Presentation transcript:

1 Day 2 Special Education PACTA PIL Special Education Service Delivery, IEP Implementation and Student Achievement Brenda Kauffman, Special Education Consultant Donna S. Weldon, Esq. September 17, 2010

2 Agenda Scenarios Keys to Success for Students with IEPs in CTE – Special Education Service Delivery Models – Transition – Supplemental Supports and Services - SDI IEPs Roles Responsibilities Activities and Planning

3 GOAL: To ensure every student achieves proficiency by 2014. To achieve this goal, it is necessary that the career technical centers and the sending school districts coordinate courses and academic supports.

4 Scenarios ScenarioStaffTrainingMOUOther and Comments 1.. CTE staff attends IEP but is inappropriate 2. CTE staff goes to IEP but says nothing 3. CTE staff contributes to IEP but none of the input is included in document 4. CTE not invited to IEP. CTE receives IEP 2 weeks after enrollment 5. Student enrolls. No IEP.

5 Scenarios Continued ScenarioStaffTrainingMOUOther and Comments 6. Student, who has significant needs and who requires Autistic Support Consultant, enrolls but his needs for this level of support are not included in the IEP. 7. Student, whose disability and needs for support are so intensive that he is not able to access the general vocational curriculum even with intensive supplementary supports and services and he is a safety risk to himself and others.

6 At the end of today’s session, You should be knowledgeable about special education in the least restrictive environment and IEP processes so that you can provide leadership and oversight in your schools. You will be able to read IEPs and determine if your school is able to deliver the supports and services that are listed You will know what you need to do if a student is not making progress, is failing and/or you are having trouble delivering the IEP You will have drawn your school’s special education organizational chart You will have drawn your IEP flow chart You will have access to tools that support the transition process as well as the preparation for the demands of career technical education You will access to a tool that can be used to profile a class and then used to specify appropriate supports and services for individual students. You will have resources that will provide information and guidelines regarding special education issues. You will have a plan for how to move forward with the components of special education delivery to support student achievement in your school.

7 Activation Strategy: So, where are we??? Aha Moments from 9-16 Special Education Student What are we doing well? What are we not doing? What do we need to do better What is the urgency?

8 Special education service delivery model embedded in overall effective, evidence based career technical education system Special education staff to case manage, write IEPs, provide direct support to students and staff CTE staff that understand their roles and responsibilities regarding serving students with IEPs in the general career technical training programs Training for referring teams about the opportunities and demands of CTE Collaboration / Communication between the referring school and CTC as well as between the academic and the career technical programs Knowledgeable participants at IEP meeting Systematic use of tools like Skills Alignment Charts by referring schools and CTC to prepare students for the demands of the career technical training program and to determine goals and pinpoint SDI Full IEP implementation Progress Monitoring and Instruction Revision as needed

9 … the free and appropriate pubic education (FAPE) of students with special needs that is based on and addresses the unique individual differences and needs of each student …the education of students with disabilities in the least restrictive environments (LRE) to the maximum extent possible with the use of supplementary aids and services. …the education of students with special needs based on an individually developed and systematically monitored plan of annual educational goals, teaching procedures, interventions, specially designed instruction (SDI), supports and services (the IEP).

10 Federal and Commonwealth Commitment: LRE Least Restrictive Environment Recognizing that the placement decision is an Individualized Education Program (IEP) team decision, our goal for each child is to ensure IEP teams begin with the general education setting with the use of Supplementary Aids and Services before considering a more restrictive environment.

11 Student Placement & LRE Student placement decisions begin with a consideration of the general education classroom with the use of a wide array of supplementary aids and services, resulting in general class placement for students representative of the full range of disabilities for meaningful portions of the school day. All general educators expect that they will have students with disabilities in their classrooms and welcome them as members.

12 It is not a place or a class; it is a service. It is inclusive education… The students with disabilities in your class are fully included in the general career technical education program with mostly the same expectations as all students but with supplementary aids and service that provide support to the student and to you. Full inclusion means high expectations for students and high expectations for staff. Fair, Equal Outcomes High Expectations Supports and Services

13 Who are the students 29% to 60% of the students enrolled in CTE schools are students with IEPs (Jobs for the Future) PSSA The proportion of career and technical education students taking the 11 th grade PSSA that have IEPs is double the proportion of all students taking the 11 th grade PSSA that have IEPs – 26.6% versus 13.6%. AYP Graduates/Completers NOCTI Transition to employment Transition to post secondary training

14 Why are the students with IEPs coming to LCCTC CTE has a history of providing excellent education, training and support to this population CTE provides rigorous and relevant programming CTE provides career training leading to job skills and/linkages to post secondary training CTE is the keystone of the transition plans for many student with IEPs CTE is drop out prevention for some students

15 Head Swimming???

16 Special Education Service Delivery Models

17 Special Education in LCCTC: One CTE Special Education Service Delivery Model Cross System Service Delivery Model with emphasis on collaboration LCCTC16 Referring Districts IU 13 Heavy emphasis on aligning the preferral and application processes with the transition planning process to increase the number of students who re-are placed in programs that meet their career interests, abilities and aptitudes (Skills Alignment Charts) Heavy emphasis on visitations, guidance and the application/admissions process

18 Special Education Staff LCCTC/IU13/16 district Special Education Service Delivery Model Fee for Service Special education staff to student ratio following Chapter 14 Guidelines Array of special education support services assigned only to you and available for you and for the students daily/as per schedule Itinerant Learning Support Teachers for Full Day Students Learning Facilitators for Half Day Students Special Education Consultants Psychologist Social Worker Supervisor Cross System Service Delivery Model with emphasis on collaboration Heavy emphasis on aligning the pre-referral and application processes with the transition planning process to increase the number of students who are placed in programs that meet their career interests, abilities and aptitudes (Skills Alignment Charts) Heavy emphasis on visitations, guidance and the application/admissions process Special education staff to student ratio Collaborative IEP process with districts, CTC and IU Special Educators at mtgs IEPs for full day students written by your special education staff for your program and reviewed with you early in the school year Array of special education support services available for you and for the students daily/as per schedule CTE teacher delivers IEP with support from IU special educator and team as well as with support from CTE administration and IU special education team CTE monitors progress/works with IU special education teacher to monitor progress CTE teacher implements behavior plans with support of special education team CTE teacher communicates student performance issues concerns to parents, special education support teacher, CTC administration and/or RtII groups

19 Training, Collaboration and Communication LCCTC/IU13/16 district Special Education Service Delivery Model Training for CTE staff Training for district referring teams Training for Special Education direct service staff Time for outreach and collaboration with referring districts Collaboration and communication with job alike groups Checks and balances regarding referrals Informal and formal networks of communication focusing on macro as well as individual issues related to special education service delivery and special education student concerns

20 IEP PROCESS LCCTC/IU13/16 district Special Education Service Delivery Model Collaborative IEP process with districts. Minimally, CTC Guidance and IU Special Educators at meetings IEP schedule developed by CTC guidance and IU team IEPs for full day students written by your special education staff for your program and reviewed with you early in the school year IEPs for Cluster students are written by districts but with input from LFer and your Guidance staff and then reviewed with you early in the school year CTE teacher delivers IEP with support from IU special educator and team as well as with support from CTE administration and IU special education team

21 Next Steps for 2010/2011 SY Continued collaboration between entities IEP implementation in CTE classes with emphasis on the role of the CTE teacher Implementation of IEP goals that are specific to each child and to each CTE program Progress monitoring and documentation Request for increased CTE teacher involvement in the IEP process Assessment and refinement of service delivery

22 Activity: Your Special Education Organizational Chart/Service Delivery Model Make a graphic that represents your Special Education Service Delivery System Include how many students with IEPs/number of general career technical students, number of referring districts, type of school. Highlight key components of special education service delivery, areas of strength and those of concern

23 …the education of students with special needs based on an individually developed and systematically monitored plan of annual educational goals, teaching procedures, interventions, specially designed instruction, supports and services (the IEP)...

24 ‘IEP must be reasonably calculated to enable the child to receive meaningful education benefit in light of their intellectual potential……’ Donna Weldon, Special Education PIL PACTA, September 2010

25 Knowledgeable stakeholders at IEP meeting Pertinent PLAAFP Transition Plan based on assessment, interest, ability, aptitude and preparation for demands of training or work environment Goals that address student needs in CTE program Supplementary Supports and Services – Specially Designed Instruction – Related Services – Supports for School Personnel Full IEP implementation Progress Monitoring and Instruction Revision as needed

26 Students requiring intensive support Students requiring moderate support Students requiring minimal support RtII Triangle used to provide structure for conceptualizing CTC demographics Basic supports /service s Many complex supports & services More Supports/ Services

27 In the IEP for CTE Students, we Provide information in depth information about the student in the Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) Consider program elements of the general career technical education setting using the Skills Alignment Chart Identify potential barriers to learning and curriculum access in the general education classroom using the Skills Alignment Chart Identify strategies and services to eliminate barriers using the Skills Alignment Chart and the IEP team’s knowledge of student and CTE programming Discuss and analyze appropriate supplementary supports and service options, goals and determine viable means for implementation in developing the IEP

28 IEP Team Members Special Considerations Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance Parent Concerns How disability affects progress in general curriculum** Participation in State and Local Assessments Transition Services – Course of Study* Goals and Objectives as well as Progress Monitoring Requirements Supplementary Aids and Services** Specially Designed Instruction Related Services Supports for School Personnel Educational Placement / LRE Questions

29 Student, if 14 or older Parent/Guardian Regular Education Teacher Special Education Teacher Career Tech Representative* LEA Representative Community Agency Representative, if parents agree Specialists as appropriate – OT, PT, JTer Who represents you?/Do IEPs reflect their input? Is your CTE teacher present? Are you at the table?

30 Students requiring intensive support Students requiring moderate support Students requiring minimal support RtII Triangle used to provide structure for conceptualizing CTC demographics Standard Participants As Many Staff As Appropriate to Needs Teacher, if possible, as well Supports/Services

31 Special Education Teacher: – Manages special education paperwork – Writes IEPs for full day students – Works with teachers and administration to implement the IEP and behavior plan if appropriate – Collaborates and coordinates to ensure all services are delivered – Progress monitors student/Works with teachers to monitor progress – Communicates with teacher and student regularly – Along with teacher, communicates with parents – Works with teacher, student, parent to determine if more supports and services are needed. Documents on IEP as revision. May need to reconvene IEP team. – Guides reevaluation process. The GO-TO Person The GO-TO Person

32 Transition

33 Primary Purpose To ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living H.R.1350 (IDEA 2004) 33 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act IDEA 2004

34 Transition Services 300.43(IDEA 2004) Transition Services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that is designed to be within a results oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of a child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including post secondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living or community participation. Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests….

35 Transition Goals Must Be Based on Transition Assessment Transition assessment is an ongoing process of collecting information on the student’s strengths, needs, preferences and interests as they relate to the demands of current and future living, learning and working environments.” Pamela Leconte Assess for Success, 2007

36 SECONDARY TRANSITION ROADMAP

37 Transition Requirements Set Program of Study to Reach Post School Goals Transition services are required for students age 14 or younger if determined appropriate by the IEP team. – If the students does not attend the meeting, the school must take steps to ensure that the student’s preferences and interests are considered. – Student must be made aware of educational options available to him/her, such as the Career and Technical Education but must also determine post secondary training and employment opportunities – Academic program, course of study should prepare student for desired post school goals

38 TRANSITION GOALS Annual goals must be measureable estimates of expected student outcomes in an academic year based on the student’s present level of academic achievement and functional performance and anticipated rate of learning. Annual goals should lead to achievement of the post-secondary goals. Annual goals must address education and training, employment and, as needed, independent living.

39

40 Supplementary Supports and Services (SaS) Key to Achievement and to Successful LRE Placement Supports w/in the general career technical program related to how disability affects progress in general curriculum** – Specially Designed Instruction (SDI) – Supports for School Personnel (BK’s note: under utilized) – Related Services

41 Students requiring intensive support Students requiring moderate support Students requiring minimal support RtII Triangle used to provide structure for conceptualizing CTC demographics Many to Fewest Many Most Daily Daily to weekly Could be daily/weekly/pe riodically. Often independent/te acher driven

42 42 CollaborativeAdults working together to support students. InstructionalDevelopment and delivery of instruction that addresses diverse learning needs. PhysicalAdaptations and modifications to the physical environment. Social-BehavioralSupports and Services to increase appropriate behavior and reduce disruptive or interfering behavior Source: Etscheidt & Bartlett, 1999 Supplementary Aids and Services

43 Using a keyboard/portable electronic device Instruction in keyboarding skills/ use of a scribe or note taker Reading directions aloud Using special writing tools Providing charts/conversion charts/visual cues Color coding Providing graphic organizers Modifying curricular goals may not be possible in CTE setting 43 SaS: Instructional Examples – What you might see

44 44 Preferential seating Adaptive equipment Visual Reminders Student requested breaks in pre-set area out of the classroom Separate study area that is designated as distraction free setting for seatwork/homework Water bottle or sensory object at desk SaS Physical Examples What you might see

45 Support for rules and expectations Increased direct instruction for rules, expectations, safety protocol Individualized behavioral support plan Social skills training Staff supports– daily check-ins Counseling supports Communication with parents Self reporting of behavior Peer support 45 SaS: Behavioral Examples

46 Transition to CTE and the Identification of Supplemental Supports and Services for Inclusion in CTE are Frequently Disjointed & “Fuzzy” Processes Students take interest inventories, ability and aptitude tests – scores are reported Students take tours of CTE schools/programs Students apply to CTE programs sometimes without the blessing or knowledge of the IEP team IEP teams talk about academic profiles but frequently do little to address how the child’s disability would affect his/ her involvement in the general career technical education curriculum CTE representatives talk about the demands of the CTE programs but IEP teams often to not address the student’s needs for supplemental supports and services in relation to the rigorous CTE training environment Students are frequently accepted with little synthesis of the planning, preparation and design for supports needed for them to be successful

47 47 Must begin with an understanding of the instructional context of the general education classroom Universal design for learning work Organize types of supplementary aids and services Ecological Inventory approach/discrepancy analysis (environmental scan) Identification of and elimination of curriculum barriers (CAST) Instructional, social, physical, and collaborative domains from the literature (Etscheidt & Bartlett, 1999) How to Think About the Design of SDI, Supplementary Supports and Services

48 48 48 Compile Information About Student; Identify Student Strengths and Needs Develop Profile of General Education Classroom(s) Identify Potential Barriers to Curricular Access and Instruction Identify Strategies and Services to Eliminate Barriers Identify Viable Alternatives for Implementation A Multi-Step Process

49 Tools to Address Preparation and Determination of Needed Supplemental Supports and Services Problems Skills Alignment Charts Class Profiles

50 Discrepancy Chart/Skills Alignment Chart: A Tool to Help Students Prepare ALL Students with IEPs for transition to the Rigor of Career Tech Education and for IEP Teams to Pinpoint Support Needs CTE Program Requirements Student Present Ed Levels Needs for Support/How disability impacts function in general career technical program

51 Document Camera – Sample Discrepancy Charts, IEP Planning Tools, Skills Alignment Charts Lancaster County Career Technical Center and IU 13 Berks County Career Technical Center Lenape AVTS Sommerset

52 Another Tool for students with complex needs…and possibly for students with moderate needs SAS Class Profile Modified for CTE

53 53 Supplementary Aids and Services (SAS) Consideration Tool Modified for Use in CTE 1 Completed By:Identify classroom(s) used as a reference point for Step 1: Date:Student: 2 Coding Key: 1 = never; 2 = occasionally; 3 = frequently 1 2 3 Printed Materials  Textbook  Workbook  Trade book  Worksheets  Newspapers/magazines  Other ____________________ Frequency of Use 2 1.1 Instructional Method/ Materials Identify Supplementary Aids and Services to address potential barriers. Consider all possibilities, consulting available resources and support personnel. Identify any difficulties you can anticipate for this student (if nothing is changed) based on his/her current skills, needs, and learning profile. Create a profile of the instructional environment(s) by circling the number that best describes the frequency of use of identified materials and instructional practices. Step 3: Identify Strategies and Services to Eliminate Barrier Step 2: Identify Potential Barriers to Curricular Access and Instruction Step 1:Develop Profile of General Education Classroom(s).

54 54 References Cited Supplementary Aids and Services (SaS) Considerations Toolkit, PaTTAN website: www.pattan.net Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST). http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/ http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/ Etscheidt, S. K., & Bartlett, L. (1999). The IDEA Amendments: A four-step approach for determining supplementary aids and services. Exceptional Children, 65(2), 163-174.

55 BREAK

56 PROGRESS MONITORING for Informed Instructional Decision-Making Progress monitoring is the ongoing process of collecting and analyzing data to determine student progress.

57 HOW DO I PROGRESS MONITOR? How does progress monitoring work? To implement progress monitoring, the student’s current levels of performance are determined and goals are identified for learning that will take place over time. The student’s performance is measured on a regular basis (weekly or monthly). Progress toward meeting the student’s goals as defined by the IEP is measured by comparing expected and actual rates of learning. Based on these measurements, teaching is adjusted as needed. Thus, the student’s progression of achievement is monitored and instructional techniques are adjusted to meet the individual students learning needs.

58 While a requirement for special education and is component of many of the School Reform initiatives, progress monitoring provides benefits to the educational process. Some benefits include: – accelerated learning because students are receiving more appropriate instruction; – a day-to-day to inform instructional decisions; – timely interventions when student is not making progress; – documentation of student progress for accountability purposes; – more efficient communication with families and other professionals about students’ progress; – higher expectations for students by teachers WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF PROGRESS MONITORING?

59 How do you monitor progress? What data is collected? – Frequency rate, percentage, duration, quality of product or performance, level or frequency of assistance, time requirement to complete task – Where will it be collected Classroom, cafeteria, lab area, training site, – How often as defined by IEP/student goals Daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly – Who will collect the data? Career technical teacher, special education teacher, paraeducator, student, disciplinarian – How will data be collected Structured surveys or interviews, observations, teacher made lists, rubrics, assessment checklists, rating scales, curriculum based assessment, anecdotal records – How will data be represented Graphs, charts and checklists

60 Sample Progress Monitoring Document Camera

61

62 And, what happens if the student is not making progress? Communication to inform case manager, parents, district Consultation, observation to ensure IEP is being delivered w/ fidelity. Adjust as needed. May need to revise IEP to add more SaS May need to reconvene IEP team/add/revise goals or behavior plan Emphasis on what the staff does to support

63 PHILLIP M.’s IEP

64 Using Phillip’s IEP Who participated in the meeting from your school? What special considerations are noted that will require your school’s attention? List pertinent details in PEL that will shape Phillip's educational plan in his Auto Body program? How do academic achievement and functional performance affect student’s involvement in the general career technical curriculum? What activities are listed on Transition Plan that you will be responsible for delivering? How would your school delivery those services?

65 Phillip’s IEP – con’t List accommodations for PSSA. Is NOCTI addressed on this IEP? How would you ensure that Phillip received instruction, weekly charting and progress monitoring on the IEP goals listed for CTC? Could the 3 rd goal accommodate Phillip’s needs at the CTE? If so, what steps would you take? List SDI requirements and note how you would implement in your school. What do you look for in your class walk throughs?

66 Phillip’s IEP con’t Should AT be included in Related Services for this student in your school? Identify the Supports for School Personnel. Do they provide adequate training and support for your staff to implement this IEP? Based on the questions noted under Educational Placement, do the statements reflect Phillip’s programming needs in the CTE?

67 Read the IEP from your school IF you were the CTE teacher, could you implement the IEP as written? To do so, what supports would you need? Does the IEP reflect the demands of the CTE program in the PLAAFP, Course of Study, Goal, SDI? What gaps do you see? What conversations do you need to have with which stakeholders to follow up?

68

69 IEP Activity Review IEP goals, conditions and SDI What is the frequency for SDI and progress monitoring What supports are available to your teacher/staff Does your teacher need more support than is listed What must the teacher do What must the student do What should the special educator do What should the principal do Describe how you would support your teacher who had these students in his/her class in terms of implementing the IEP Describe the evidence you would look for as your walked through class to ensure that the IEP was being implemented Discuss how you would provide oversight to make sure student was making progress Identify the steps you would take if the student was not making progress

70 Key Implementation Guidelines for the School Year to Ensure Student Achievement Current IEPs on site, reviewed by CTE teacher and implemented Supports and services are in place or teacher is asking for assistance Student progress and performance data is being monitored, interventions added to programming as needed Communication with parents and district stakeholders (when appropriate) is on-going and at multiple levels in relation to overall student performance PBSP/BIPs are implemented Disciplines are monitored to ensure that PBSPs/interventions are in place IEP team reconvenes as needed Analysis of IEP student performance to determine needs for supports Communication, outreach, cross system stakeholder training and planning for 10/11 school year, special education service delivery in the CTE and referral/admissions processes to the CTE

71 Evidence: What You May Look For Working together to ensure that we are delivering supports and services as per IEP. Students performance or lack performance as noted on Classmate grades or NOCTI Student discipline data Documentation of student visits to Learning Support Room Off task student behavior Presence of Special Education Staff in class doing small group instruction/providing individualized interventions System for implementing IEPS and system for organizing required SDI Evidence of progress monitoring/data collection Differentiated instruction – reteaching, special vocabulary sessions, modeling with small group, peer tutors, visual aids, student use of calculators or formula/conversion charts in lab area, work ethic skill reminders, peer tutors, teacher notes Teaching Plans with SDI notations/Reminders regarding Special Education Services

72 LUNCH

73 PROCESS

74 Roles and Responsibilities Administration Guidance CTE Teacher Special Education Teacher/IEP Case Manager Paraeducator

75 Administration’s Role LEADERSHIP: Working collaboratively to – Develop the vision and the expectations regarding special education service delivery – Process and support the ‘why’ of inclusion and student enrollment – Establish goals for implementation – Determine connections, incentives, accountability – Align special education plan to overall school improvement efforts to support student achievement

76 Leadership’s Role in Implementation Staff Training Structure and time Support Oversight – Student progress and performance – Data – Staff implementation and staff performance

77 Principal’s Role Staff performance – support and accountability Student performance – oversight, questioning if students are not performing, oversight of interventions Time and Structure – time to meet Training – lunch time, after school meetings Communication with district stakeholders and with Executive Director

78 Guidance Counselor’s Role Provide information about programs Guide students in the pre-referral process Use of interest, ability and aptitude information to guide students in the CTE selection process (CAUTION: Can not pre-determine enrollment) May include outreach to referring districts

79 Special Education Teacher: – Manages special education paperwork – Writes IEPs for full day students – Works with teachers and administration to implement the IEP and behavior plan if appropriate – Collaborates and coordinates to ensure all services are delivered – Progress monitors student/Works with teachers to monitor progress – Communicates with teacher and student regularly – Along with teacher, communicates with parents – Works with teacher, student, parent to determine if more supports and services are needed. Documents on IEP as revision. May need to reconvene IEP team. – Guides reevaluation process. The GO-TO Person The GO-TO Person

80 To provide input into IEP meetings/To participate when invited To implement the IEP specifically for each student To ask for assistance if IEP is not clear and/or if implementation is not possible in your setting To immediately report concerns/failure/failed performance to Special Education Support Team and CTC Admin Team To monitor progress and adjust instruction and interventions as needed To communicate with parents and support team if the student is not making progress To maintain confidentiality

81 To provide input to teacher in preparation for IEP meeting/To participate when invited Under the direction of the special education teacher, to assist with the implementation of the IEP specifically for each student To ask for assistance if IEP implementation requirements are not clear To immediately report concerns/failure/failed performance to the teacher, special education teacher To monitor progress and communicate with teacher so that he/ she can adjust instruction and interventions or contact parents as needed To maintain confidentiality

82 Evidence: Together, WE need to ensure that we are delivering supports and services as per IEP. Students performance or lack performance as noted on Classmate grades or NOCTI Student discipline data Documentation of student visits to Learning Support Room Off task student behavior Presence of Special Education Staff in class doing small group instruction/providing individualized interventions System for implementing IEPS and system for organizing required SDI Evidence of progress monitoring/data collection Differentiated instruction – reteaching, special vocabulary sessions, modeling with small group, peer tutors, visual aids, student use of calculators or formula/conversion charts in lab area, work ethic skill reminders, peer tutors, teacher notes Teaching Plans with SDI notations/Reminders regarding Special Education Services

83 Special Education Resources PaTTAN Publications and Training Intermediate Unit Trainers CT DSLs PACTA Sp Professional Organization Penn State McKeesport Websites CEC, NICHY, NSTTAC, NASDE Disability Websites

84 Setting Priorities to Ensure High Quality Special Education Service Delivery Components Activity 1.Review your IEP Component worksheet. Identify areas of need. Establish priorities. 2.Share with partner. 3.Report out.

85 Stand and Stretch

86 Questions..Self-Reflection!@#$#@!? So how are we doing? Are we providing services as presented? Where are our gaps? Does the leadership team fully understand our special education service delivery model? Does the staff ? Are we represented at IEP meetings? Are we implementing IEP requirements/using SDI/monitoring progress and changing instruction? Does my staff have time to meet with special educators? In a discipline process, are we following SDI, PBSPs? How are we partnering with our constituent districts to serve their students effectively? How are we working with parents?

87 Final Training Activity: Your School’s Plan for Increasing Achievement for Students with IEPs Create a graphic or a list that represents your special education service delivery model (How do services flow) Create an organizational chart that represents your staffing for special education and its hierarchy. Identify job descriptions to be modified to include special education responsibilities and best practices. Create a flow chart that represents the steps students take in the referral, application IEP and enrollment process Identify areas of concern and next steps Use the information above to modify the attached MOU to reflect the needs of your delivery model

88 Closing Remarks & Reminders Questions/Comments Evaluation Forms Robert - Assignments

89 YOUR QUESTIONS

90 Thank You


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