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Meeting Arizona College and Career Ready Standards for Special Education Specialists Day 1 Presenters: Sharen Bertrando Kevin Schaefer

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Presentation on theme: "Meeting Arizona College and Career Ready Standards for Special Education Specialists Day 1 Presenters: Sharen Bertrando Kevin Schaefer"— Presentation transcript:

1 Meeting Arizona College and Career Ready Standards for Special Education Specialists Day 1 Presenters: Sharen Bertrando Kevin Schaefer WestEd’s Center for Prevention & Early Intervention

2 Welcome Introduction Who is in the room? Logistics Overview of Training

3 1.Be an active participant 2.Respect others’ contributions 3.View through multiple lenses 4.Power up electronic devices, but 5.Put cell phone on silent Ground Rules/Norms

4 Training Outcomes Recognize instructional shifts of Arizona College and Career Ready Standards (AZCCRS) in ELA/Literacy and Mathematics Explain the importance of access to AZCCRS for students with disabilities Define the role of the special education specialist in implementing the AZCCRS for students with disabilities Describe Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles and identify resources that support all students, including students with disabilities Identify individualized areas of need and determine appropriate goals resulting in reasonably calculated Individualized Education Programs (IEPs).

5 Objectives for Day 1 – Participants will be able to... Recognize the instructional shifts needed to implement AZCCRS State the importance of access to AZCCRS for students with disabilities Define your roles in implementing AZCCRS for students with disabilities Describe the components for developing AZCCRS standards-aligned IEP goals

6 Objectives for Day 2 – Participants will be able to... Practice developing and writing AZCCRS IEP goals and benchmarks aligned to students’ present levels of academic and functional performance (PLAAFP) Become familiar with readily available resources, instructional practices, and evidenced-based strategies to support students with disabilities Develop an action plan to build capacity within your school/district Address participants’ questions to Arizona State Department of Education and WestEd consultants

7 Arizona College and Career Ready Standards (AZCCRS)

8 Arizona College and Career Ready Standards

9 AZCCRS Instructional Shifts ELA/Literacy Shifts 1. Balancing Informational and Literary Text 2. Building Knowledge in the Disciplines 3. Staircase of Complexity 4. Text-based Answers 5. Writing from Sources 6. Academic Vocabulary

10 AZCCRS Instructional Shifts ELA/Literacy Shifts 1. Balancing Informational and Literary Text 2. Building Knowledge in the Disciplines 3. Staircase of Complexity 4. Text-based Answers 5. Writing from Sources 6. Academic Vocabulary 1.Examine standards and instructional shifts 2.Consider the implications of these shifts for students with disabilities 3.Be ready to share out using the following sentence frame: If students have to... then teacher have to...

11 AZCCRS Implications for Students & Teachers If students have tothen teachers have to develop questions that increasingly engage others model questioning and highlight different purposes of questions.

12 AZCCRS – ELA/Literacy Shifts 1.PK-5, Balancing Informational & Literary Texts Knowledge in the Discipline 3.Text-Based Answers 4.Writing from Sources 5.Staircase of Complexity 6.Academic Vocabulary 1.Building knowledge through content-rich informational & literary text 2.Reading & writing grounded in evidence from text 3.Regular practice with complex text & its academic vocabulary (New York Dept of Ed/Teacher Domain/Science Foundation,

13 AZCCRS Instructional Shifts Mathematical Shifts 1. Focus 2. Coherence 3. Fluency 4. Deep Understanding 5. Application 6. Dual Intensity

14 AZCRRS – Mathematical Shifts 1.Focus 2.Coherence 3.Fluency 4.Deep Understanding 5.Application 6.Dual Intensity 1.Focus – Actively engage with tasks without prompting 2.Coherence – Think across grades and link to major topics within grades 3.Rigor – Require fluency, application, and deep understanding

15 AZCCRS in Mathematics Fluency A Balanced Approach As you watch the video - reflect on how this information might change your pedagogical practice for teaching mathematics.

16 AZCCRS – Fluency in Mathematics

17 AZCCRS Mathematics Coding

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21 Learning Mathematics in the 21 st Century Math needs a makeoverWhat practices are addressed in the video? How might the AZCCRS Mathematical Standards overview handout be used as a guide in developing IEPs in the content area of mathematics?

22 Arizona College & Career Ready Standards (AZCCRS)

23 College/Career Readiness Anchor Standards Webb’s Depth of Knowledge Bloom’s Taxonomy Universal Design for Learning College and Career Ready Standards Progress Indicators Learning Targets FAPE in the LRE Hess’ Cognitive Rigor Matrix Individualized Goals and Objectives Educational Benefit Standards for Mathematical Practices

24 “To pursue the bright spots is to ask the question, ‘What’s working, and how can we do more of it?’”

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26 NCSC – Commitment to Communicative Competence Communication at some level is possible and identifiable for all students regardless of functional “level,” and is the starting point for developing communicative competence. Communication competence is defined as the use of a communication system that allows students to gain and demonstrate knowledge. Many people with severe speech or language problems rely on alternative forms of communication, including augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems, to use with existing speech or replace difficult to understand speech. Communicative-Competence pdf

27 IEP Alignment

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32 Formative Assessment Gets Us Where We Want to Go

33 “Formative assessment – encompasses all those activities undertaken by teachers, and/or by their students, which provide information to be used as feedback to modify the teaching and learning activities are engaged.”

34 “An assessment functions formatively to the extent that evidence about student achievement is elicited, interpreted, and used by teachers, learners, or their peers to make decisions about the next steps in instruction that are likely to be better, or better founded, than the decisions they would have made in the absence of that evidence.”

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36 An integrated model of literacy Although the Standards are divided into Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language strands for conceptual clarity, the processes of communication are closely connected, as reflected throughout this document. For example, Writing standard 9 requires that students be able to write about what they read. Likewise, Speaking and Listening Standard 4 sets the expectation that students will share findings from their research.

37 AZCCRS for ELA Content Overview

38 AZCCRS RL – Integrated Literacy Find references to “prompting and support” and “ask and answer questions” RL.K-12.4: reference to L.K RL.K-2.5: differentiates between RL and RI RL.K-5.8: is not applicable RL.3&4.5: integrates writing and speaking RL.2.6: integrates speaking RL.4.7: integrates speaking (oral presentation receptive language) Note executive functions and ask, “under what conditions will the student demonstrate mastery?

39 AZCCRS RI – Integrated Literacy RI.K-12.4: reference to L.K RI : integrates listening (info. orally presented) RI.4&5.9: integrates writing and speaking RI : integrates history/social studies, science and technical texts Note executive functions and ask, “under what conditions will the student demonstrate mastery?”

40 AZCCRS RF – Integrated Literacy RF.K.1-3: note emphasis on spoken words/ phonemic awareness RF.1.2: note the emphasis on spoken words/ phonemic awareness RF.1-5.3&4: note progression from spoken words/ phonemic awareness to spelling/sound relationships to decoding/reading Consider language-based disabilities (auditory processing) when addressing phonemic awareness

41 AZCCRS W – Integrated Literacy Find references to “guidance and support” W.K : lists types of writing as 1.opinion/argument; 2.informative/explanatory; 3.narrative W : “opinion” pieces change to “argument” W : references “Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in writing standards 1-3” W : references “Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of L standards 1-3” Reading expectations are included: W and W Executive functions are numerous and critical

42 AZCCRS SL – Integrated Literacy Reading expectations are included: SL Writing (fine motor) expectations are included: SL.K- 5.5 Language expectations are included: SL Consider language-based disabilities (auditory processing) when addressing oral, i.e., expressive/receptive language Executive functions are numerous and critical

43 AZCCRS L – Integrated Literacy Reading AND speaking expectations are included: L.K Writing/spelling expectations are included: L.K-12.2 Reading, writing, AND speaking and listening expectations are included: L and L Reading and speaking and listening expectations are included: L.K-3.6 Executive functions are numerous and critical

44 Prompting https://wiki.ncscpartners.org/mediawiki/index.php/Instructional_Resource_Guide

45 BLOOM’S TAXONOMY Remembering UnderstandingApplyingAnalyzingEvaluatingCreating Can the student recall or remember the info.? define duplicate list memorize recall repeat reproduce state Can the student explain ideas or concepts? classify describe discuss explain identify locate recognize report select translate paraphrase Can the student use the info. in a new way? choose demonstrate dramatize employ illustrate interpret operate schedule sketch solve use write. Can the student distinguish between the different parts? appraise compare contrast criticize differentiate discriminate distinguish examine experiment question test Can the student justify a stand or decision? appraise argue defend judge select support value evaluate Can the student create new product or point of view? assemble, construct create design develop formulate write

46 AZCCRS – Depth of Knowledge Fo cuses on complexity of content standards in order to successfully complete an assessment or task. The outcome (product) is the focus of the depth of understanding. The Depth of Knowledge is NOT determined by the verb (Bloom’s Taxonomy), but by the context in which the verb is used and the depth of thinking required.

47 AZCCRS – Depth of Knowledge An Example DOK 1- Describe three characteristics of metamorphic rocks. (Requires simple recall) DOK 2- Describe the difference between metamorphic and igneous rocks. (Requires cognitive processing to determine the differences in the two rock types) DOK 3- Describe a model that you might use to represent the relationships that exist within the rock cycle. (Requires deep understanding of rock cycle and a determination of how best to represent it)

48 AZCCRS – Depth of Knowledge It’s about what follows the verb, i.e., what comes after the verb is more important than the verb itself. Analyze this sentence to decide if the commas have been used correctly” does not meet the criteria for high cognitive processing. The student who has been taught the rule for using commas is merely using the rule.

49 DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE LEVELS (The Depth of Knowledge is not determined by the verb, but what comes after the verb and the context in which the verb is used, i.e., the depth of thinking required. Level 1: Recall and Reproduction Requires recall of information, such as a fact, definition, term, or performance of a simple process or procedure. Answering a level 1 item involves following a simple, well-known procedure or formula. Simple skills and abilities or recall characterize this level. Level 2: Skills/Concepts Includes the engagement of some mental processing beyond recalling or reproducing a response. Items require students to make some decisions as to how to approach the question or problem. These actions imply more than one mental or cognitive process/step. Level 3: Strategic Thinking: Requires deep understanding as exhibited through planning, using evidence, and more demanding cognitive reasoning. The cognitive demands at this level are complex and abstract. An assessment item that has more than one possible answer and requires students to justify the response they give would most likely be a Level 3. Level 4: Extended Thinking Requires high cognitive demand and is very complex. Students are expected to make connections – relate ideas within the content or among content areas – and have to select or devise one approach among many alternatives on how the situation can be solved. Due to the complexity of cognitive demand, this level often requires an extended period of time.

50 Depth of Knowledge Activities

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52 Educational Benefit and the IEP

53 When writing goals and objectives, ask: How will the student demonstrate mastery? Given what Under what conditions With which adaptations

54 When writing goals and objectives, ask: How will the student demonstrate mastery? Unpack it Define it Verb it

55 When writing goals and objectives, ask: How will the student demonstrate mastery? Increase independence Decrease support (appropriately) Trellis

56 Assessment-based Cognitive Goal Progression - Activity AZCCRS.W.7.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

57 Five Ways to Individualize Goals 1.Unpacking/Unlocking Standards 2.Combining Standards Within a Strand 3.Bloom’s Taxonomy (change the verb) 4.Adaptation Plans/Under What Conditions 5.Trellising AZCCRS Goal Writing for Educational Benefit & Post-Secondary Success

58 Measurable Goals – Seven Key Components 1. Baseline (current level related to goal and assessed need) 2. Who (the student) 3. Does What (measurable behavior, i.e. standard) 4. When (reporting date) 5. Given What (under what conditions) 6. How Much (mastery criteria-think of me) 7. How Measured (performance data or assessment)

59 Individualized Goals & Objectives Unpack/Decompose Standards Decide whether the student can master the entire standard within a year or only part of the standard. W : Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above)

60 Individualized Goals & Objectives Combining Standards within a Strand Decide if the standards within a strand can be integrated to generalize academic skills. W ,2,3; 4-6 : Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above)

61 Individualized Goals & Objectives Bloom’s Taxonomy (change the verb) Using Bloom’s Taxonomy, vary the difficulty to which the student will meet the expectation of the standard. SL.5.3: Summarize the points a speaker or media source makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence and identify and analyze any logical fallacies.

62 Individualized Goals & Objectives When writing goals and objectives, the question is: “Under what conditions/with which adaptations will the student demonstrate mastery?”

63 Individualized Goals & Objectives Adaptation Plans/Under What Conditions RI.4.1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

64 Individualized Goals & Objectives Assessment-based, cognitive goal progression Objective #1: By 1/15/2014, using a grade level passage read to Kevin orally while he follows along, he will refer (point) to details and examples in the text when explaining (orally) what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text with an average of 80% accuracy on 3 consecutive tests/assignments.

65 Individualized Goals & Objectives Assessment-based, cognitive goal progression Objective #2: By 5/15/2014, using a small, contained amount of high interest text at Kevin’s independent reading level, he will refer to details and examples (by rereading) in the text when explaining (orally) what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text with an average of 80% accuracy on 3 consecutive tests/assignments.

66 Individualized Goals & Objectives Assessment-based, cognitive goal progression Goal: By 10/15/2014, using a page or short chapter of high interest text at Kevin’s independent reading level, he will refer to details and examples (by rereading) in the text when explaining (written) what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text with an average of 90% accuracy on 3 consecutive tests/assignments.

67 Individualized Goals & Objectives Trellising Based on assessment; allows teachers to identify standard at which student is currently functioning, determine area(s) of need and move up or down through standards.

68 Individualized Goals & Objectives Trellising Consider the student’s current grade level standard first. Differentiate the standard so the student can access grade level standard/materials (see previous slides) If that standard is too low, then Trellis up to the next grade level. On the other hand, if the standard is too high, Trellis down one grade level. Trellising more than one grade level may be necessary. After carefully reviewing the standard in need, decide if the standard needs “unpacking/unlocking”.

69 Individualized Goals & Objectives Trellising SL : Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence. SL.8.3: Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced. SL.6.3: Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.

70 Universal Design for Learning Universal Design for Learning Maryland Learning Links

71 Universal Design for Learning What are some of the barriers to successful learning that your students face?

72 Ramps Curb Cuts Electric Doors Captions on Television Easy Grip Tools… What is Universal Design?

73 Drawbacks of Retrofitting: Each retrofit solves only one local problem Retrofitting can be costly Many retrofits are UGLY! What is Universal Design?

74 What is the link between architecture and curriculum? “Consider the needs of the broadest possible range of users from the beginning” -- Architect, Ron Mace

75 What is Universal Design? Is our learning environment welcoming? UDL is the proactive design of curriculum and instruction to ensure they are educationally accessible regardless of learning style, physical or sensory abilities. Just as physical barriers exist in our physical environment, curricular barriers exist in our instructional environment.

76 How is Universal Design Defined? The term UDL means a scientifically valid framework for guiding educational practice that: Provides flexibility in the ways information is presented (recognition), in the ways students respond or demonstrate knowledge and skills (action and expression), and in the ways students are engaged (engagement); and

77 How is Universal Design Defined? The term UDL means a scientifically valid framework for guiding educational practice that: …reduces barriers in instruction, provides appropriate accommodations, supports, and challenges, and maintains high achievement expectations for all students, including students with disabilities and students who are English Language Learners. (Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008)

78 Brain-based research indicates three distinct yet inter- related learning networks (Rose, Meyer, Hitchcock, 2005): Recognition Learning Network (what) How we make sense of presented information Affective Learning Network (why) How motivation & participation impacts learning Strategic Learning Network (how) How we demonstrate our learning or mastery UDL Foundations: Brain-based Learning Networks

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80 Principle 1: Provide Multiple Means of Representation How am I going to ensure that key information is equally perceptible by all students... How am I going to ensure accessibility, clarity, and comprehensibility for all students... How am I going to provide the necessary scaffolds to ensure that all students have access to knowledge and can assimilate new information... so that all of my students will be successful? Recognition Network: The What of Learning

81 Supports for Student Diverse Recognition Networks Examples Underlining/highlighting Vertical lines/asterisks/doodles/num margin Provide multiple media/formats “Chunking” information Graphic Organizers Provide multiple examples Support background context The “What” of Learning Identify and interpret sound, light, taste, smell, and touch Identify and understand information, ideas, and concepts

82 Strategic Network: The How of Learning Principle 2: Provide Multiple Means of Action & Expression Have materials been provided with which all students can interact, navigate, and express what they know... Have I provided alternative modalities for expression, to level the playing field and to allow all students the opportunity to express knowledge, ideas, and concepts in the learning environment... How have I provided necessary strategies and scaffolds for students to be more plan-full and strategic... so that all of my students will be successful?

83 Supports for Student Diverse Strategic Networks Examples – Multi-media for student expression (video, audio, text, drawing) – Concept mapping tools – Scaffolds and prompts – Checklists – Embedded coaches and mentors, peer tutors – Assessment rubrics for students The “How” of Learning The ability to plan, execute, and monitor actions and skills

84 Affective Network: The Why of Learning Principle 3: Multiple Means of Engagement Have I provided alternative ways to recruit student interest, ways that reflect inter- and intra- individual differences amongst students... Have I provided options for students who differ In motivation and self-regulation skills... Have I provided alternatives to support students with different aptitudes and prior experience to effectively manage their own engagement and affect... so that all of my students will be successful?

85 Supports for Student Diverse Affective Networks Examples – Choice afforded – Age appropriate activities – Culturally relevant activities – Charts/schedules/visible timers – Display of goals – Group work/collaboration – Personal journal The “Why” of Learning The ability to engage in actions and skills, set priorities and evaluate

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87 Consider what small changes you could make to this good lesson to make it even stronger and designed to meet the edges of all the learners in the classroom?

88 88 UDL In Action

89 Big Ideas to Take Away—UDL Plan ahead for learner variability; Instruction can and should be flexible and accessible (when planned); Multiple representations, output and expression, and means of engagement will benefit all learners.

90 Wrap Up & Exit Slip Please complete the Exit Slip and leave it on your tabletop as you leave Exit Slip as ticket out the door. We look forward to seeing you tomorrow. Thank you!


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